Skin Wound Healing Process and New Emerging Technologies for Skin Wound Care and Regeneration



Baixar 2.23 Mb.
Pdf preview
Página9/18
Encontro26.07.2022
Tamanho2.23 Mb.
#24374
1   ...   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   ...   18
pharmaceutics-12-00735
Figure 3.
Schematic representation of Tissue (T), Infection (I), Moisture (M) and Epithelial (E)
(TIME) concept.
3.1.1. Tissue (T): Debridement Procedure
Over the past decade, new therapies for wound debridement have been developed, such as
low-frequency ultrasounds, hydro-surgery devices, larvae and enzyme agents. It is widely recognized
that devitalized tissue removal is a fundamental process for tissue repair [
39
]. Debridement is optimal
for preparing the wound bed, but in some cases is not recommended (i.e., in immunosuppressed
patients). Once all injury assessment factors have been revised, and wound debridement has been
decided as an appropriate option, the most appropriate debridement method should be selected [
40
],
taking in consideration the amount of exudate produced by the wound. The most common debridement
types are as follows. Autolytic: the body uses endogenous enzymes and moisture gradients to remove
devitalized and necrotic tissue. This is a long process, more suitable for minor injuries. Wound
care products such as hydrogels, films, honey and hydrocolloids can be used to support this natural
process and allow wound healing in a humid environment [
39
]. Surgical: surgical removal allows us
to identify the entire condition of the wound. Sterile instruments are used to remove devitalized or
necrotic tissues; often, this procedure also removes some vital tissue. Surgical debridement is fast, safe,
minimizes the risk of infection and chronic wound complications [
41
]. Mechanical: this is an e
ffective
and economical method of debridement. The disadvantages of this method are the lack of selectivity
and pain. It can be applied through hydrotherapy, using water jets to wash residues from the wound
surface. Another mechanical debridement method is wet–dry therapy, where a wet gauze is applied
to a wound and then left to dry; once dried, the gauze that bound the necrotic or devitalized tissue
is removed from the wound bed [
42
]. Biological: the application of sterile larvae-secreting enzymes,
able to liquefy dead tissue; the liquid-containing bacteria is then ingested and neutralized by larval
bowels. In addition, there is an increase in wound bed growth rates and advantageous changes to skin
pH values. This procedure provides a safe and selective debridement method; however, it is poorly
accepted by patients and doctors [
43
]. Enzymatic: this procedure involves the application of enzymes
into the wound bed, with a proteolytic action on the necrotic tissue. It is a pH-dependent process and


Pharmaceutics 2020, 12, 735
8 of 30
proteolytic enzymes can be deactivated by specific agents. Some examples of proteolytic enzymes are
papain, collagenase and fibrinolysis [
44
].
3.1.2. Infection (I): Prevention Strategies
After the proper cleaning of the wound bed and a debridement procedure, an antiseptic product is
needed to prevent infection and biofilm formation. Many antiseptic products are cited in the literature
and their selection should consider toxicity towards granulation tissue. Antiseptics are chemical
products, capable of preventing or stopping the action of microorganisms, either by inhibiting
their functions, or by destroying them [
42
].
They are recommended only when unavoidable.
The biotechnology industry has developed substances with local and selective antiseptic action
and limited side e
ffects in tissues, such as local slow-release antiseptics, i.e., substances exploiting their
action only when released at the site of injury, with doses selectively more e
ffective on bacteria and less
e
ffective on tissues. Common antiseptics include iodine, silver (including silver sulfadiazine, which has
a potent bacteriostatic action), polyhexanide and betaine (PHMB), sodium hypochlorite, chlorhexidine
and acetic acid. Iodine powder can be applied to the wound site; the powder allows the absorption of
exudate and creates an environment less favorable for bacterial proliferation. Silver, which is one of
the historical antibacterial agents, unlike antibiotic molecules, does not induce resistance in bacteria
and, for this reason, it is a useful treatment [
45
]. Silver sulfadiazine 1% causes an ultrastructural
change in the bacterial membrane and it destroys bacterial DNA through irreversible bonds inhibiting
bacterial cell respiration and altering electrolyte transport and folate production. Silver sulfadiazine
1% is an e
fficient treatment in wound management and is on the market as a polyurethane foam
that acts by occluding the wound bed and guaranteeing its transpiration. This device allows the
absorption of exceeding exudate and create a microenvironment unfavorable for bacterial proliferation,
delivering silver. There are also absorbent gauzes with activated carbon (AC) and silver cores (SCs),
combining AC absorption properties with the bacteriostatic action of silver. New products proposed by
pharmaceutical companies are breathable and non-adherent gauze, soaked in a bacteriostatic substance
such as honey, which has therapeutic properties. Ultrasound is another method exploited for fighting
infections, it separates devitalized tissues from healthy ones through the mechanism of cavitation [
46
].
Furthermore, this treatment alters the bacterial membrane, increasing its permeability to antibacterial
substances. All the main guidelines agree in recommending the non-use of local antibiotics, because
more disadvantages than advantages have been highlighted. Local hypersensitivity reactions or
dermatitis are examples of adverse e
ffects due to topical use of antibiotics [
47
].
3.1.3. Moisture (M) Balance and Exudate Management
There are di
fferences between the exudate composition of acute and chronic wounds. The exudate
of acute wounds is rich in leukocytes and nutrients, while that of chronic wounds has high levels
of proteases, pro-inflammatory cytokines and MMPs. The increased proteolytic activity of chronic
exudate inhibits healing, damages the wound bed, degrades the extracellular matrix and destroys skin
integrity. Additionally, high levels of cytokines promote and prolong chronic inflammatory responses.
For this reason, an adequate equilibrium of wound moisture is required. Too much exudate causes an
injury to the surrounding skin; low amounts of fluid inhibit cellular activities and lead to formation of
scar tissue. Bad exudate management could lead to biofilm formation. Therefore, exudate volume
and viscosity should be considered during dressing screening. Most common treatments for exudate
management are absorbent medications and negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT). Some types of
absorbent dressings include films, hydrogels, acrylics, hydrocolloids, calcium alginates, hydrofibers
and foams [
48
]. The composition of hydrogel formulations includes insoluble copolymers capable
of binding water molecules. Water present in the matrix can transfer to the wound, whereas the
matrix itself is able to absorb the wound exudates, maintaining an optimal level of moisture [
46
].
Alginate-based products (calcium alginate, sodium alginate or alginic acid) are hydrogels able to absorb
wound exudates and maintain a moist wound environment [
48
]. Traditional dressings are impermeable


Pharmaceutics 2020, 12, 735
9 of 30
to water vapor, di
fficult to remove and show a poor absorption capacity; advanced medications
overcome these drawbacks. One example of such advanced medications would be hydrofibers, which
are dressings composed of carboxymethylcellulose sheets with a high absorbance capacity and a simple
removal procedure.
3.1.4. Epithelial (E) Edge Advancement
The evaluation of wound edges may indicate whether the contraction of wounds and
epithelialization is progressing, providing essential signs about treatment e
ffectiveness or the need for
reassessment. Treatments addressed to improve wound healing and wound edge advancement include
electromagnetic therapy (EMT), laser therapy, systemic oxygen therapy and negative pressure wound
therapy (NPWT). Pulsed EMT consists of a short-term energy emission that has the advantage of
protecting tissues from damage and heat generated by continuous emissions. However, further studies
are needed to explore the e
ffects of EMT [
49

53
]. In conclusion, complete and timely wound closure
is the main objective of all aspects of wound care, although this is not always achievable. Chronic
wounds, in particular, are challenging to e
ffectively treat. Most clinical guidelines are still a work in
progress because of the continuous improvements in wound pathology, healing and therapeutic agents.
Although the basic principles of TIME have not changed greatly since its first inception, its applications
have been expanded with advances in knowledge and wound management [
38
].
3.2. Advanced Dressings: The Transition of Advanced Dressings from Passive to Active Role in Wound
Healing Process
Advanced dressings (AD) are composed of di
fferent materials that can facilitate the healing process
in all its phases. These new products are often able to remain active on the wound bed for several
days, reducing the number of medications and procedures needed for their replacement. Advanced
medications contribute significantly to the healing of complex wounds (such as chronic wounds),
reducing health care costs. In general, a dressing is a device used to remedy damage caused by an
injurious stimulus, providing protection to the wound from the external environment, promoting
healing and reducing the risk of infection. There are di
fferent types of medication and each of these
has a specific purpose. Prevention: dressings for preventing injuries that could occur in areas under
pressure, for example, in people who are forced to remain motionless for a long time. Coatings: called
second dressings, such as ointments, creams, etc. Protection: dressings for protecting the wound
bed from external contamination or mechanical trauma, to avoid alterations in the healing process,
for example, in the case of surgical wounds. Cure: aimed at promoting healing, as well as protecting
against exogenous agents and trauma.
Medications performing prevention and coating actions are relatively simple and can be classified
as “Traditional dressings” (TDs), whereas those addressing protection and cure are classified as
“Advanced dressings” (ADs). Simple medications by TDs are performed on minor lesions, which show
minimal secretions and tend to promote rapid healing; some examples are slight surgical incisions,
erythema or non-severe ulcers. The dressing is applied on the skin to protect the wound, but it does not
play an active role in the healing process [
54
]. These dressing are characterized by their low cost and
ease of use. However, TDs have many disadvantages, including the promotion of ischemia
/necrosis
and the need for frequent substitutions. In order to overcome these disadvantages, studies have been
carried out on the formulation of innovative wound care technologies; this has led to the development
of ADs that play an active role in treating more serious injuries with complex healing processes [
55
].
These types of medications exploit the properties of biocompatible materials of natural or synthetic
origin and stimulate, through interaction with tissues, a response aimed at faster healing [
56
].
The roles played by biomaterials used to make ADs are as follows. Active: materials that play an
active role in wound treatment and healing stimulation; passive: compounds that absorb exudation and
protect the wound from external agents; interactive: agents that control the lesion microenvironment,


Pharmaceutics 2020, 12, 735
10 of 30
managing the healing process. Scientific progress in ADs has led to the consideration of a wound
dressing as a medication that is completely involved in the healing process.
Regardless of the nature of the lesion and the method used, an ideal AD should be biocompatible
and biodegradable, and should have optimal water adsorption and retention properties, low cytotoxicity,
nonstick ability, and antibacterial e
ffects. It should allow gas exchange, and trap wound exudates
to maintain the hydration of the wound. ADs could act as platforms for the delivery of di
fferent
active agents (such as growth factors, anti-fibrotic, anti-microbial, and anti-inflammatory agents,
small-molecule drugs, nucleic acids) or cells that boost the synergy of wound healing [
37
].
Currently, the human recombinants platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), fibroblast growth factor
(FGF) and epidermal growth factor (EGF), are extensively investigated for wound repair application [
8
].
However, their low absorption capacity, short in vivo half-life and high risk of carcinogenesis restrain
their use in wound repair.
Cutisorb
™, Iodosorb, and Actisorb Silver 220 are few examples of antimicrobial dressings already
on the market. Acticoat and Acticoat medications are a new generation of product; they exploit a new
nanocrystal silver coating technology and the dressings are properly designed for preventing adhesion
to the wound surface, controlling bacterial growth and promoting wound treatment. These ADs are
recommended for treating partial- or full-thickness wounds (pressure, venous, diabetic and chronic
wounds and leg ulcers) where infections are very common [
37
]. In Table S1, we present a comparative
summary of emergent skin wound care and regeneration technologies.

Baixar 2.23 Mb.

Compartilhe com seus amigos:
1   ...   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   ...   18




©historiapt.info 2022
enviar mensagem

    Página principal