Skin Wound Healing Process and New Emerging Technologies for Skin Wound Care and Regeneration



Baixar 2.23 Mb.
Pdf preview
Página5/18
Encontro26.07.2022
Tamanho2.23 Mb.
#24374
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   18
pharmaceutics-12-00735
Figure 1.
Schematic representation of wound healing process with cells involved in each phase.
The regeneration process involves sequential phases regulated by gene expression, via autocrine
or paracrine mechanisms. The ending of active processes is achieved by gene silencing during the
progression of the regeneration process [
11
]. Wound healing is one of most complex process in the
human body, since it involves the spatial and temporal synchronization of the inflammatory phase
with tissue regeneration and remodeling. The inflammatory phase follows the injurious event and
it includes the coagulation cascade, inflammatory pathway and immune system involvement [
12
].
All these events take place to prevent an excessive loss of blood, fluids and the development of
infections, and to facilitate the removal of dead or devitalized tissue. Hemostasis is achieved by platelet
clot generation, followed by fibrin matrix formation, which acts as a sca
ffold for cell infiltration. As a
result of platelet degranulation, the release of chemotactic signals by necrotic tissues, and of bacterial
degradation products, the complementary system is activated and neutrophils arrive at the lesion [
13
].
Finally, macrophages coordinate all events evolved in response to damage. These cells are responsible
for fibrin phagocytosis activity and cellular debris, and they secrete macrophage-derived growth factor
(MDGF) for fibroblasts and endothelial cells [
14
]. New tissue formation begins within two to ten days
after the lesion and consists of cell proliferation and the migration of di
fferent cytotypes. When the
lesion involves the dermis, a poorly di
fferentiated and highly vascularized connective tissue called
granulation tissue is formed, which consists of cellular and fibrillar components integrated in an
apparently amorphous matrix. The cells of granulation tissue are (i) fibroblasts, responsible for the
synthesis of the fibrillar component; (ii) myofibroblasts, involved in the wound contraction mechanism
and (iii) endothelial cells, responsible for the neo-angiogenesis process [
15
].
The re-epithelization process, characterized by the proliferation and migration of keratinocytes
towards the core part of the lesion, originates in this phase as the area between the bottom and the
edges of the wound is filled with granulation tissue. This represents the matrix in which keratinocytes,
residing on lesion edges, migrate and proliferate [
14
]. Skin re-epithelization structural organization can
be explained by two models: sliding and rolling models. According to the sliding model, keratinocytes
of the basal layer su
ffer a modification of their anchoring joints (desmosomes and hemidesmosomes),


Pharmaceutics 2020, 12, 735
4 of 30
allowing their detachment and lateral migration into the core part of the lesion. According to the
rolling model, keratinocytes go through a morphological and functional modification, together with
desmosomes, resulting in them rolling towards basal keratinocytes, which instead remain anchored to
the basal membrane [
16
]. Basal layer regeneration leads keratinocytes to proliferate and di
fferentiate
vertically, restoring the physiological features of the multilayered epithelial tissue.
The remodeling phase starts about three weeks after an injurious advent and lasts for over a year.
During this phase, all processes activated in previous phases are silenced and macrophages, isolated
endothelial cells and myofibroblasts run into apoptosis or they are relocated from the wound, leaving a
region rich in collagen and other extracellular matrix deposition (ECM) proteins. Interactions between
the epidermis and dermis, together with additional feedback, allows the continuous regulation of skin
integrity and homeostasis. Type III collagen, located in ECM, is gradually replaced in 6–12 months [
17
].
2.3. Acute and Chronic Wound Healing
Acute wounds (such as traumatic and surgical wounds) pass through the normal wound healing
stages, resulting in an expectable and organized tissue repair arrangement [
18
]. On the contrary, chronic
wounds involve a disordered repair process and they can be mainly classified into vascular ulcers
(such as venous and arterial ulcers), diabetic ulcers and pressure ulcers [
19
]. Chronic wounds exhibit
a persistent inflammation phase, resulting in microorganism recruitment, biofilm development [
20
],
and the release of platelet-derived factors, such as transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β), or ECM
fragment molecules. The pro-inflammatory cytokine cascade, including interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and
tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), continues for a prolonged period, leading to important levels of
protease in the wound bed. In chronic wounds, protease levels go above those of inhibitors, triggering
ECM destruction, and boosting proliferative and inflammatory phases [
21
]. Inflammatory cells
collected in the chronic wound bed rise to levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), resulting in ECM
protein injuries and premature cellular senescence [
22
]. Chronic injuries are also characterized by
phenotypic defects in the cells and dermis, such as reduced growth factor receptor density and mitogen
potential, inhibiting resident cells from responding adequately to wound healing signals [
23

25
] On the
contrary, proteases are tightly regulated by their inhibitors in acute injuries, avoiding ECM destruction
and supporting the proliferation phase.
2.4. Inside a Chronic Wound: Physical Elements of the Chronic Wound Healing Process
The main physical manifestations of chronic wounds are represented by exudation, persistent
infection and necrosis, which are responsible for wound management and care complexity [
26
].
2.4.1. Exudate
The wound exudate is a reflection of wound bed physiology. Similarly, the skin wound creates
an exudate that represents the micro-environment of the insulted tissue. The exudate is a marker of
the chronic state of an injury or a sign of wound treatment e
ffectiveness. There is increasing evidence
that destructive e
ffects observed in chronic injuries can be aggravated by exudate components that,
being corrosive in nature, result in continuous ECM degradation. The isolation of these components
has identified metalloproteinases (MMPs), in particular MMP-9s, as dominant components in the
destructive process; moreover, a relationship between elevated bacterial and MMP-9 levels in chronic
wounds has been established [
27
]. In addition, exudation may be the first indicator of possible
systemic complications [
28
]; the signaling of mediators and protein content can provide information
about the type of tissue involved in the damage and facilitate the selection of the most appropriate
treatment approach.
2.4.2. Infection
After an injury, the skin activates an inflammatory mechanism that not only produces exudate,
but also leads to the formation of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) in response to infection. AMPs are


Pharmaceutics 2020, 12, 735
5 of 30
amphipathic peptides and they are constitutively expressed or induced after cellular activation in
response to inflammatory or homeostatic stimulation. The most carefully studied AMP families in
the human skin are defensins and cathelicidins, which are produced by a variety of skin cells such as
keratinocytes, fibroblasts, dendritic cells, monocytes, macrophages and sweat and sebaceous glands.
The access of bacteria in a skin region that has su
ffered an insult is an inevitable phenomenon and
sometimes the immune action turns out to be ine
ffective, leading to complications and even deaths in
subjects with important chronic skin lesions [
29
]. Healthy skin is richly populated by bacteria that play
an important role in skin ecosystem. In the case of the interruption of skin continuity, the bacteria
migrate from the skin surface to regions in which they are not normally hosted, causing an imbalance
that leads to infection in the skin wound. Bacteria may originate from the external environment, such as
Staphylococcus aureus, or from bacteria residing in hollow organs migrating through the blood pathway.
An additional bacterial risk is represented by biofilm formation, a micro-environment layer rich in
glycoprotein that adheres to the wound bed, protecting bacteria and enhancing their proliferation.
The biofilm matrix makes bacteria tolerant to challenging conditions and resistant to antibacterial
treatments. In addition, biofilms are responsible for causing a wide range of chronic diseases and,
due to the emergent antibiotic resistance in bacteria, it has become very di
fficult to effectively treat
them [
30
,
31
].
2.4.3. Necrosis
Devitalization or
/and necrosis arise when an infection is unresolved, or the tissue has irreparable
damage. Frequently, superficial infections progress towards deep tissue layers, involving bone tissue
and sometimes a
ffecting systemic pathways, leading to generalized sepsis and bacteremia. Skin necrosis
is characterized by a wide range of etiologies including external factors or, more frequently, vascular
occlusion. Necrosis is a serious disease defined as the death of cells or tissue for pathological reasons;
usually, it shows up as a purplish, bluish or black skin coloration, and it is irreversible. When it is
accompanied by bacterial infection and decomposition, gangrene is mentioned. The main necrotizing
infections are as follows: ecthyma, a bacterial infection that causes ulcerations and scabs; necrotizing
fasciitis, an infection that causes rapid necrosis of subcutaneous fat with production of malodorous
serum; and acute meningococcemia, which causes an acute petechial eruption that can be followed by
ecchymosis and ischemic necrosis [
32
].
2.5. Di
fference between Healed and Physiological Tissue: Scarring
The human body always reacts to an injury, activating the wound healing process and scar
formation. Scars are e
fficient neo-formation tissues, however they do not reproduce characteristics
and functions of physiological tissue that they replace [
33
]. Any damage in humans is repaired by
a neo-formation that replaces the missing tissue with an extracellular matrix, consisting mainly of
fibronectin and collagen types I and III, and there are some skin components that will not recover
after a serious injury, such as subepidermal appendages, hair follicles or glands [
34
]. The scar tissue
matrix, represented by granulation tissue, is the final product and it is characterized by a high density
of fibroblasts, granulocytes, macrophages, capillaries and collagen fibers [
35
]. In the primordial
scar tissue phase, angiogenesis is not yet complete, although it is abundantly present and it appears
reddened. The dominant cells at this stage are fibroblasts, which have di
fferent functions such as
collagen production and ECM components (e.g., fibronectin, glycosaminoglycans, proteoglycans and
hyaluronic acid (HA)). At the end of this phase, the amount of fibroblasts in the maturation phase is
reduced by their di
fferentiation in myofibroblasts [
36
]. Scar formation ends in the remodeling phase of
the wound healing process (Figure
2
), it starts at day 21 and goes on for 1 year after injury. During
wound maturation, ECM components undergo constant changes. Collagen III, which is produced in
the proliferative phase, is now replaced by the strongest type I form of collagen, which is oriented
in small parallel bundles, di
ffering from the healthy dermis texture [
34
]. Then, myofibroblasts cause
the contraction of the wound due to their strong adhesion to collagen, helping with wound healing.


Pharmaceutics 2020, 12, 735
6 of 30
In addition, angiogenic processes and blood flow in the wound bed decrease, acute wound metabolic
activity slows down and eventually it stops, leading to mature scar formation. Scar formation is
the physiological endpoint of wound repair in mammals. When excessive scarring occurs, there is
an imbalance between biosynthesis and degradation, mediated by apoptosis and ECM degradation,
and this dysfunction leads to a persistent inflammatory phase, a prolonged proliferation phase
and reduced remodeling [
32
]. Hypertrophic scars contain excessive microvessels, which are mostly
occluded due to the over-proliferation and functional regression of endothelial cells, induced by
myo-fibroblastic hyperactivity and excessive collagen production. Changes in ECM and the epithelium
also appear to be involved in abnormal scarring; mechanical stress stimulates skin mechanical–sensory
nociceptors, which release neuropeptides involved in vessel modification and fibroblast activation [
5
].

Baixar 2.23 Mb.

Compartilhe com seus amigos:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   18




©historiapt.info 2022
enviar mensagem

    Página principal