Skin Wound Healing Process and New Emerging Technologies for Skin Wound Care and Regeneration


 Phases and Complications of the Wound Healing Process



Baixar 2.23 Mb.
Pdf preview
Página3/18
Encontro26.07.2022
Tamanho2.23 Mb.
#24374
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   18
pharmaceutics-12-00735
2. Phases and Complications of the Wound Healing Process
2.1. An Overview of Wounds and Their Consequences
Wounds have a variety of causes, namely surgery, injuries, extrinsic factors (e.g., pressure, burns
and cuts), or pathologic conditions such as diabetes or vascular diseases. These types of damage are
classified into acute or chronic wounds depending on their underlying causes and consequences [
4
].
Acute wounds usually proceed through an organized and appropriate repair process, resulting in the
sustained restoration of anatomical and functional integrity. On the contrary, chronic wounds are not
able to achieve optimal anatomical and functional integrity. Healing is related to and determined by
both pathological processes nature, degree and status of host and environment. Systemic factors such
as patient age, the presence of vascular, metabolic and autoimmune diseases, as well as ongoing drug
therapy, may a
ffect the wound healing process [
5
]. An ideally healed wound is an area returned to
normal anatomical structure, function and appearance after an injury; a minimally healed wound is
characterized by the restoration of anatomical continuity, but without sustained functional results;
therefore, the wound can recur. Between these two conditions, an acceptably healed wound is
characterized by the restoration of sustained functional and anatomical continuity.
Wound extent evaluation and classification can be performed by non-invasive and invasive
technologies. Non-invasive evaluation includes the determination of wound perimeter, maximum
length and width dimensions, surface area, volume, amount of weakening, and tissue viability.
Invasive methods quantify the wound extent in terms of tissue levels from its surface to its depth [
5
].
A wound can be further described by various attributes, including blood flow, oxygen, infection,
edema, inflammation, repetitive trauma and
/or insult, innervation, wound metabolism, nutrition,
previous injury handling, and systemic factors. All these attributes can provide evidence of the origin,
pathophysiology and condition of a wound [
6
].
Ultimately, wounds should be assessed by considering their e
ffect on the host, as patient status is
essential in understanding the impact of systemic factors on the wound. The evaluation of the healing
process is quite challenging since it is a dynamic process and it requires constant, systematic and
consistent evaluation, involving a continuous reassessment of wound extent, type and severity.
Quality of life is impaired by wound persistence and the care cost manifests from both a
psychological point of view and in the prolonged hospitalization time, as well as morbidity and even
mortality. For these reasons, wounds have been called a “Silent Epidemic” [
7
]. Most of the financial
costs relate to health care personnel employment, the time and cost of hospitalization and the choice of
materials and treatments. For all these reasons, the development of new technologies, intended to
improve the healing process, is challenging [
8
].
2.2. Phases of Wound Healing
Skin epithelial cells are labile elements that are continuously eliminated in the stratum corneum
through the keratinocyte desquamation process and are replaced, in the basal layer, by di
fferentiated


Pharmaceutics 2020, 12, 735
3 of 30
elements derived from stem cell proliferation and di
fferentiation. Cell renewal varies according to
di
fferent factors, such as trauma, hormonal influences, skin conditions and individual wellbeing.
However, the cutaneous regenerative process, in reference to a wound lesion, is inversely proportional
to the evolution of the considered species [
9
]. It consists of numerous phases activated by intra and
intercellular biochemical pathways and coordinated in a harmonious way to restore tissue integrity
and homeostasis. Cellular elements such as the coagulation cascade and inflammatory pathways
are also involved. Several cells are involved such as fibroblasts, keratinocytes and endothelial cells,
and neutrophils, monocytes, macrophages, lymphocytes and dendritic cells as immune components [
10
].
In Figure
1
, a schematic representation of the wound healing process is presented, with the cells
involved in each phase.
Pharmaceutics 202012, x FOR PEER REVIEW 
3 of 30 
differentiated elements derived from stem cell proliferation and differentiation. Cell renewal varies 
according to different factors, such as trauma, hormonal influences, skin conditions and individual 
wellbeing. However, the cutaneous regenerative process, in reference to a wound lesion, is inversely 
proportional to the evolution of the considered species [9]. It consists of numerous phases activated 
by intra and intercellular biochemical pathways and coordinated in a harmonious way to restore 
tissue integrity and homeostasis. Cellular elements such as the coagulation cascade and 
inflammatory pathways are also involved. Several cells are involved such as fibroblasts, 
keratinocytes and endothelial cells, and neutrophils, monocytes, macrophages, lymphocytes and 
dendritic cells as immune components [10]. In Figure 1, a schematic representation of the wound 
healing process is presented, with the cells involved in each phase. 

Baixar 2.23 Mb.

Compartilhe com seus amigos:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   18




©historiapt.info 2022
enviar mensagem

    Página principal