Skin Wound Healing Process and New Emerging Technologies for Skin Wound Care and Regeneration



Baixar 2.23 Mb.
Pdf preview
Página17/18
Encontro26.07.2022
Tamanho2.23 Mb.
#24374
1   ...   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   18
pharmaceutics-12-00735
9. Future Prospective
Recent emerging cutting-edge technologies provide innovative pathways and strategies to improve
severe wound treatments. The current scenario is constantly updated by several e
fforts carried out in
di
fferent fields, including interdisciplinary science, material science engineering, and gene therapies,
to name few. The progress in skin repair and regeneration is occurring very quickly as result of novel
technological improvements in biomedical research technologies, such as disease pathways, advanced
medical device technology and therapies. These innovations can support better science, as well as faster
medical treatment development, a reduction in costs and experiments on animals. The innovative
techniques recently exploited, in combination with conventional methods, o
ffer a great perspective for
the future. In particular, the innovative trend of regenerative medicine, together with personalized
medicine, may facilitate advanced wound treatment development, leading to rapid healing, as well as
painless and scarless treatment.
Supplementary Materials:
The following are available online at
http:
//www.mdpi.com/1999-4923/12/8/735/s1
,
Table S1: Comparative summary of skin wound care and regeneration emergent technologies (technology,
application advantages and disadvantages and examples of commercial products).
Author Contributions:
Conceptualization, R.D. and B.C.; writing—original draft preparation, E.M.T.;
writing—review and editing, R.D.; visualization, E.C. and S.P.; supervision, B.C. and I.G. All authors have
read and agreed to the published version of the manuscript.
Funding:
This research received no external funding.
Conflicts of Interest:
The authors declare no conflict of interest.
References
1.
Borena, B.M.; Martens, A.; Broeckx, S.Y.; Meyer, E.; Chiers, K.; Duchateau, L.; Spaas, J.H. Regenerative Skin
wound healing in mammals: State-of-the-art on growth factor and stem cell based treatments. Cell. Physiol.
Biochem. 2015, 36, 1–23. [
CrossRef
] [
PubMed
]
2.
Schiavon, M.; Francescon, M.; Drigo, D.; Salloum, G.; Baraziol, R.; Tesei, J.; Fraccalanza, E.; Barbone, F.
The Use of Integra Dermal Regeneration Template Versus Flaps for Reconstruction of Full-Thickness Scalp
Defects Involving the Calvaria: A Cost-Benefit Analysis. Aesthet. Plast. Surg. 2016, 40, 901–907. [
CrossRef
]
[
PubMed
]
3.
Boyce, S.T.; Lalley, A.L. Tissue engineering of skin and regenerative medicine for wound care. Burn. Trauma
2018
, 6, 4. [
CrossRef
] [
PubMed
]
4.
Karimi, K.; Odhav, A.; Kollipara, R.; Fike, J.; Stanford, C.; Hall, J.C. Acute cutaneous necrosis: A guide to
early diagnosis and treatment. J. Cutan. Med. Surg. 2017, 21, 425–437. [
CrossRef
]
5.
Lazarus, G.S.; Cooper, D.M.; Knighton, D.R.; Margolis, D.J.; Pecoraro, R.E.; Rodeheaver, G.; Robson, M.C.
Definitions and Guidelines for Assessment of Wounds and Evaluation of Healing. Arch. Dermatol. 1994, 130,
489–493. [
CrossRef
]
6.
Guo, S.; Dipietro, L.A. Factors a
ffecting wound healing. J. Dent. Res. 2010, 89, 219–229. [
CrossRef
]
7.
Ward, J.; Holden, J.; Grob, M.; Soldin, M. Management of wounds in the community: Five principles. Br. J.
Community Nurs. 2019, 24, S20–S23. [
CrossRef
]
8.
Frykberg, R.G.; Banks, J. Challenges in the Treatment of Chronic Wounds. Adv. Wound Care 2015, 4, 560–582.
[
CrossRef
]
9.
Bielefeld, K.A.; Amini-Nik, S.; Alman, B.A. Cutaneous wound healing: Recruiting developmental pathways
for regeneration. Cell. Mol. Life Sci. 2013, 70, 2059–2081. [
CrossRef
]
10.
Broughton, G., II; Janis, J.E.; Attinger, C.E. The basic science of wound healing. Plast. Reconstr. Surg. 2006,
117 (Suppl. 7), 12S–34S. [
CrossRef
]


Pharmaceutics 2020, 12, 735
26 of 30
11.
Erickson, J.R.; Echeverri, K. Learning from regeneration research organisms: The circuitous road to scar free
wound healing. Dev. Biol. 2018, 433, 144–154. [
CrossRef
] [
PubMed
]
12.
Gethin, G. Understanding the inflammatory process in wound healing. Br. J. Community Nurs. 2012, 17
(Suppl. 3), S17–S22. [
CrossRef
] [
PubMed
]
13.
Velnar, T.; Bailey, T.; Smrkolj, V. The wound healing process: An overview of the cellular and molecular
mechanisms. J. Int. Med. Res. 2009, 37, 1528–1542. [
CrossRef
] [
PubMed
]
14.
Kim, H.S.; Sun, X.; Lee, J.H.; Kim, H.W.; Fu, X.; Leong, K.W. Advanced drug delivery systems and artificial
skin grafts for skin wound healing. Adv. Drug Deliv. Rev. 2019, 146, 209–239. [
CrossRef
]
15.
Alhajj, M.; Bansal, P.; Goyal, A. Physiology, Granulation Tissue; StatPearls: Treasure Island, FL, USA, 2020.
16.
Usui, M.L.; Underwood, R.A.; Mansbridge, J.N.; Mu
ffley, L.A.; Carter, W.G.; Olerud, J.E. Morphological
evidence for the role of suprabasal keratinocytes in wound reepithelialization. Wound Repair Regen. 2005, 13,
468–479. [
CrossRef
]
17.
Enoch, S.; Leaper, D.J. Basic science of wound healing. Surgery (Oxford) 2008, 26, 31–37. [
CrossRef
]
18.
Lindholm, C.; Searle, R. Wound management for the 21st century: Combining e
ffectiveness and efficiency.
Int. Wound J. 2016, 13, 5–15. [
CrossRef
]
19.
Mustoe, T. Understanding chronic wounds: A unifying hypothesis on their pathogenesis and implications
for therapy. Am. J. Surg. 2004, 187 (Suppl. 1), S65–S70. [
CrossRef
]
20.
James, G.A.; Swogger, E.; Wolcott, R.; Pulcini, E.D.; Secor, P.; Sestrich, J.; Costerton, J.W.; Stewart, P.S. Biofilms
in chronic wounds. Wound Repair Regen. 2008, 16, 37–44. [
CrossRef
]
21.
McCarty, S.M.; Percival, S.L. Proteases and Delayed Wound Healing. Adv. Wound Care 2013, 2, 438–447.
[
CrossRef
]
22.
Ben-Porath, I.; Weinberg, R.A. The signals and pathways activating cellular senescence. Int. J. Biochem. Cell
Biol. 2005, 37, 961–976. [
CrossRef
] [
PubMed
]
23.
Schultz, G.S.; Sibbald, R.G.; Falanga, V.; Ayello, E.A.; Dowsett, C.; Harding, K.; Romanelli, M.; Stacey, M.C.;
Teot, L.; Vanscheidt, W. Wound bed preparation: A systematic approach to wound management. Wound Repair
Re. 2003, 11 (Suppl. 1), S1–S28. [
CrossRef
] [
PubMed
]
24.
Loots, M.A.; Lamme, E.N.; Zeegelaar, J.; Mekkes, J.R.; Bos, J.D.; Middelkoop, E. Di
fferences in cellular
infiltrate and extracellular matrix of chronic diabetic and venous ulcers versus acute wounds. J. Investig.
Dermatol. 1998, 111, 850–857. [
CrossRef
] [
PubMed
]
25.
Kuo, P.-C.; Kao, C.-H.; Chen, J.-K. Glycated type 1 collagen induces endothelial dysfunction in culture.
In Vitro Cell. Dev. Biol. Anim. 2007, 43, 338–343. [
CrossRef
] [
PubMed
]
26.
Widgerow, A.D.; King, K.; Tocco-Tussardi, I.; Banyard, D.A.; Chiang, R.; Awad, A.; Afzel, H.; Bhatnager, S.;
Melkumyan, S.; Wirth, G.; et al. The burn wound exudate—An under-utilized resource. Burns 2015, 41,
11–17. [
CrossRef
]
27.
Mofazzal Jahromi, M.A.; Sahandi Zangabad, P.; Moosavi Basri, S.M.; Sahandi Zangabad, K.; Ghamarypour, A.;
Aref, A.R.; Karimi, M.; Hamblin, M.R. Nanomedicine and advanced technologies for burns: Preventing
infection and facilitating wound healing. Adv. Drug Deliv. Rev. 2018, 123, 33–64. [
CrossRef
]
28.
Roy, R.; Tiwari, M.; Donelli, G.; Tiwari, V. Strategies for combating bacterial biofilms: A focus on anti-biofilm
agents and their mechanisms of action. Virulence 2018, 9, 522–554. [
CrossRef
]
29.
Rajpaul, K. Biofilm in wound care. Br. J. Community Nurs. 2015, 20, S6–S11. [
CrossRef
]
30.
Beyer, S.; Pfrepper, C.; Kronberg, J.; Vucinic, V.; Ziemer, M.; Simon, J.C.; Niederwieser, D.; Treudler, R.
Ausgeprägte kutane Nekrosen und Blutungsneigung bei einem 73-jährigen Mann. JDDG 2015, 13, 252–255.
[
CrossRef
]
31.
Willyard, C. Unlocking the secrets of scar-free skin healing. Nature 2018, 563, S86–S88. [
CrossRef
]
32.
Ferguson, M.W.J.; O’Kane, S. Scar-free healing: From embryonic mechanism to adult therapeutic intervention.
Philos. Trans. R. Soc. B Biol. Sci. 2004, 359, 839–850. [
CrossRef
] [
PubMed
]
33.
Reinke, J.M.; Sorg, H. Wound repair and regeneration. Eur. Surg. Res. 2012, 49, 35–43. [
CrossRef
] [
PubMed
]
34.
Hinz, B. Formation and function of the myofibroblast during tissue repair. J. Investig. Dermatol. 2007, 127,
526–537. [
CrossRef
] [
PubMed
]
35.
Verhaegen, P.D.H.M.;
Van Zuijlen, P.P.M.;
Pennings, N.M.;
Van Marle, J.;
Niessen, F.B.;
Van Der Horst, C.M.A.M.; Middelkoop, E. Di
fferences in collagen architecture between keloid, hypertrophic
scar, normotrophic scar, and normal skin: An objective histopathological analysis. Wound Repair Regen. 2009,
17, 649–656. [
CrossRef
]


Pharmaceutics 2020, 12, 735
27 of 30
36.
Xi-Qiao, W.; Ying-Kai, L.; Chun, Q.; Shu-Liang, L. Hyperactivity of fibroblasts and functional regression
of endothelial cells contribute to microvessel occlusion in hypertrophic scarring. Microvasc. Res. 2009, 77,
204–211. [
CrossRef
]
37.
Morton, L.M.; Phillips, T.J. Wound healing and treating wounds Di
fferential diagnosis and evaluation of
chronic wounds. J. Am. Acad. Dermatol. 2016, 74, 589–605. [
CrossRef
]
38.
Leaper, D.J.; Schultz, G.; Carville, K.; Fletcher, J.; Swanson, T.; Drake, R. Extending the TIME concept: What
have we learned in the past 10 years?(*). Int. Wound J. 2012, 9 (Suppl. 2), 1–19. [
CrossRef
]
39.
Lumbers, M. Wound debridement: Choices and practice. Br. J. Nurs. 2018, 27, S16–S20. [
CrossRef
]
40.
Moore, Z. The important role of debridement in wound bed preparation. Int. Wound J. 2012, 3, 1–4.
41.
Rüttermann, M.; Maier-Hasselmann, A.; Nink-Grebe, B.; Burckhardt, M. Local treatment of chronic wounds:
In patients with peripheral vascular disease, chronic venous insu
fficiency, and diabetes. Dtsch. Arztebl. Int.
2013
, 110, 25–31. [
CrossRef
]
42.
Colenci, R.; Abbade, L.P.P. Fundamental aspects of the local approach to cutaneous ulcers. An. Bras. Dermatol.
2018
, 93, 859–870. [
CrossRef
] [
PubMed
]
43.
Rafter, L. Larval therapy applied to a large arterial ulcer: An e
ffective outcome. Br. J. Nurs. 2013, 22, S26–S30.
[
CrossRef
] [
PubMed
]
44.
Motley, T.A.; Gilligan, A.M.; Lange, D.L.; Waycaster, C.R.; Dickerson, J.E.E. Cost-e
ffectiveness of clostridial
collagenase ointment on wound closure in patients with diabetic foot ulcers: Economic analysis of results
from a multicenter, randomized, open-label trial. J. Foot Ankle Res. 2015, 8, 7. [
CrossRef
] [
PubMed
]
45.
Stojadinovic, A.; Carlson, J.W.; Schultz, G.S.; Davis, T.A.; Elster, E.A. Topical advances in wound care. Gynecol.
Oncol. 2008, 111 (Suppl. 2), S70–S80. [
CrossRef
]
46.
Alavi, A.; Sibbald, R.G.; Mayer, D.; Goodman, L.; Botros, M.; Armstrong, D.G.; Woo, K.; Boeni, T.; Ayello, E.A.;
Kirsner, R.S. Diabetic foot ulcers: Part II. Management. J. Am. Acad. Dermatol. 2014, 70, 21-e1.
47.
O’Meara, S.; Al-Kurdi, D.; Ologun, Y.; Ovington, L.G.; Martyn-St James, M.; Richardson, R. Antibiotics and
antiseptics for venous leg ulcers. Cochrane Database Syst. Rev. 2014, CD003557. [
CrossRef
]
48.
Everett, E.; Mathioudakis, N. Update on management of diabetic foot ulcers. Ann. N. Y. Acad. Sci. 2018,
1411, 153–165. [
CrossRef
]
49.
Aziz, Z.; Cullum, N.; Flemming, K. Electromagnetic therapy for treating venous leg ulcers. Cochrane Database
Syst. Rev. 2013, CD002933.
50.
Ennis, W.J.; Valdes, W.; Gainer, M.; Meneses, P. Evaluation of clinical e
ffectiveness of MIST ultrasound
therapy for the healing of chronic wounds. Adv. Skin Wound Care 2006, 19, 437–446. [
CrossRef
]
51.
Chambers, A.C.; Leaper, D.J. Role of oxygen in wound healing: A review of evidence. J. Wound Care 2011, 20,
160–164. [
CrossRef
]
52.
Suissa, D.; Danino, A.; Nikolis, A. Negative-pressure therapy versus standard wound care: A meta-analysis
of randomized trials. Plast. Reconstr. Surg. 2011, 128, 498e–503e. [
CrossRef
] [
PubMed
]
53.
Bassetto, F.; Lancerotto, L.; Salmaso, R.; Pandis, L.; Pajardi, G.; Schiavon, M.; Tiengo, C.; Vindigni, V.
Histological evolution of chronic wounds under negative pressure therapy. JPRAS 2012, 65, 91–99. [
CrossRef
]
[
PubMed
]
54.
Dhivya, S.; Padma, V.V.; Santhini, E. Wound dressings—A review. BioMedicine 2015, 5, 22. [
CrossRef
]
[
PubMed
]
55.
Kamoun, E.A.; Kenawy, E.-R.S.; Chen, X. A review on polymeric hydrogel membranes for wound dressing
applications: PVA-based hydrogel dressings. J. Adv. Res. 2017, 8, 217–233. [
CrossRef
] [
PubMed
]
56.
Stashak, T.; Farstvedt, E.; Othic, A. Update on wound dressings: Indications and best use. Clin. Tech. Equine
Pract. 2004, 3, 148–163. [
CrossRef
]
57.
Dunkin, C.S.J.; Pleat, J.M.; Gillespie, P.H.; Tyler, M.P.H.; Roberts, A.H.N.; McGrouther, D.A. Scarring occurs
at a critical depth of skin injury: Precise measurement in a graduated dermal scratch in human volunteers.
Plast. Reconstr. Surg. 2007, 119, 1722–1724. [
CrossRef
]
58.
Pang, C.; Ibrahim, A.; Bulstrode, N.W.; Ferretti, P. An overview of the therapeutic potential of regenerative
medicine in cutaneous wound healing. Int. Wound J. 2017, 14, 450–459. [
CrossRef
]
59.
Martin, P. Wound healing—Aiming for perfect skin regeneration. Science 1997, 276, 75–81. [
CrossRef
]
60.
Sa
fferling, K.; Sütterlin, T.; Westphal, K.; Ernst, C.; Breuhahn, K.; James, M.; Jäger, D.; Halama, N.; Grabe, N.
Wound healing revised: A novel reepithelialization mechanism revealed by in vitro and in silico models.
J. Cell Biol. 2013, 203, 691–709. [
CrossRef
]


Pharmaceutics 2020, 12, 735
28 of 30
61.
Werner, S.; Grose, R. Regulation of wound healing by growth factors and cytokines. Physiol. Rev. 2003, 83,
835–870. [
CrossRef
]
62.
Yao, C.; Yao, P.; Wu, H.; Zha, Z. Acceleration of wound healing in traumatic ulcers by absorbable collagen
sponge containing recombinant basic fibroblast growth factor. Biomed. Mater. 2006, 1, 33–37. [
CrossRef
]
63.
Chen, L.; Tredget, E.E.; Wu, P.Y.G.; Wu, Y. Paracrine factors of mesenchymal stem cells recruit macrophages
and endothelial lineage cells and enhance wound healing. PLoS ONE 2008, 3, e1886. [
CrossRef
] [
PubMed
]
64.
Pierce, G.F.; Mustoe, T.A.; Lingelbach, J.; Masakowski, V.R.; Gri
ffin, G.L.; Senior, R.M.; Deuel, T.F.
Platelet-derived growth factor and transforming growth factor-beta enhance tissue repair activities by
unique mechanisms. J. Cell Biol. 1989, 109, 429–440. [
CrossRef
] [
PubMed
]
65.
Kallis, P.J.; Friedman, A.J.; Lev-Tov, H. A Guide to Tissue-Engineered Skin Substitutes. JDD 2018, 17, 57–64.
[
PubMed
]
66.
Li, M.; Ma, J.; Gao, Y.; Yang, L. Cell sheet technology: A promising strategy in regenerative medicine.
Cytotherapy 2019, 21, 3–16. [
CrossRef
]
67.
Chang, D.K.; Louis, M.R.; Gimenez, A.; Reece, E.M. The Basics of Integra Dermal Regeneration Template and
its Expanding Clinical Applications. Semin. Plast. Surg. 2019, 33, 185–189. [
CrossRef
]
68.
Zaulyanov, L.; Kirsner, R.S. A review of a bi-layered living cell treatment (Apligraf) in the treatment of
venous leg ulcers and diabetic foot ulcers. Clin. Interv. Aging 2007, 2, 93–98. [
CrossRef
]
69.
Peng, L.-H.; Mao, Z.-Y.; Qi, X.-T.; Chen, X.; Li, N.; Tabata, Y.; Gao, J.-Q. Transplantation of
bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal and epidermal stem cells contribute to wound healing with di
fferent
regenerative features. Cell Tissue Res. 2013, 352, 573–583. [
CrossRef
]
70.
Kim, W.-S.; Park, B.-S.; Sung, J.-H.; Yang, J.-M.; Park, S.-B.; Kwak, S.-J.; Park, J.-S. Wound healing e
ffect of
adipose-derived stem cells: A critical role of secretory factors on human dermal fibroblasts. J. Dermatol. Sci.
2007
, 48, 15–24. [
CrossRef
]
71.
Lee, S.H.; Jin, S.Y.; Song, J.S.; Seo, K.K.; Cho, K.H. Paracrine e
ffects of adipose-derived stem cells on
keratinocytes and dermal fibroblasts. Ann. Dermatol. 2012, 24, 136–143. [
CrossRef
]
72.
Jackson, W.M.; Nesti, L.J.; Tuan, R.S. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy for attenuation of scar formation during
wound healing. Stem Cell Res. Ther. 2012, 3, 20. [
CrossRef
] [
PubMed
]
73.
Marcarelli, M.; Trovato, L.; Novarese, E.; Riccio, M.; Graziano, A. Rigenera protocol in the treatment of
surgical wound dehiscence. Int. Wound J. 2017, 14, 277–281. [
CrossRef
] [
PubMed
]
74.
High, K.A.; Roncarolo, M.G. Gene Therapy. N. Engl. J. Med. 2019, 381, 455–464. [
CrossRef
] [
PubMed
]
75.
Mavilio, F.; Pellegrini, G.; Ferrari, S.; Di Nunzio, F.; Di Iorio, E.; Recchia, A.; Maruggi, G.; Ferrari, G.;
Provasi, E.; Bonini, C.; et al. Correction of junctional epidermolysis bullosa by transplantation of genetically
modified epidermal stem cells. Nat. Med. 2006, 12, 1397–1402. [
CrossRef
]
76.
Aragona, M.; Blanpain, C. Transgenic stem cells replace skin. Nature 2017, 551, 306–307. [
CrossRef
]
77.
Trounson, A.; McDonald, C. Stem Cell Therapies in Clinical Trials: Progress and Challenges. Cell Stem Cell
2015
, 17, 11–22. [
CrossRef
]
78.
Takahashi, K.; Tanabe, K.; Ohnuki, M.; Narita, M.; Ichisaka, T.; Tomoda, K.; Yamanaka, S. Induction of
pluripotent stem cells from adult human fibroblasts by defined factors. Cell 2007, 131, 861–872. [
CrossRef
]
79.
Hu, B.-Y.; Weick, J.P.; Yu, J.; Ma, L.-X.; Zhang, X.-Q.; Thomson, J.A.; Zhang, S.C. Neural di
fferentiation of
human induced pluripotent stem cells follows developmental principles but with variable potency. Proc. Natl.
Acad. Sci. USA 2010, 107, 4335–4340. [
CrossRef
]
80.
Villa-Diaz, L.G.; Brown, S.E.; Liu, Y.; Ross, A.M.; Lahann, J.; Parent, J.M.; Krebsbach, P.H. Derivation
of mesenchymal stem cells from human induced pluripotent stem cells cultured on synthetic substrates.
Stem Cells 2012, 30, 1174–1181. [
CrossRef
]
81.
Zhang, J.; Guan, J.; Niu, X.; Hu, G.; Guo, S.; Li, Q.; Xie, Z.; Zhang, C.; Wang, Y. Exosomes released from
human induced pluripotent stem cells-derived MSCs facilitate cutaneous wound healing by promoting
collagen synthesis and angiogenesis. J. Transl. Med. 2015, 13, 49. [
CrossRef
]
82.
Wang, L.; Su, Y.; Huang, C.; Yin, Y.; Chu, A.; Knupp, A.; Tang, Y. NANOG and LIN28 dramatically improve
human cell reprogramming by modulating LIN41 and canonical WNT activities. Biol. Open 2019, 8, bio047225.
[
CrossRef
] [
PubMed
]
83.
Yang, R.; Zheng, Y.; Burrows, M.; Liu, S.; Wei, Z.; Nace, A.; Guo, W.; Kumar, S.; Cotsarelis, G.; Xu, X.
Generation of folliculogenic human epithelial stem cells from induced pluripotent stem cells. Nat. Commun.
2014
, 5, 3071. [
CrossRef
] [
PubMed
]


Pharmaceutics 2020, 12, 735
29 of 30
84.
Ehrenreich, M.; Ruszczak, Z. Update on tissue-engineered biological dressings. Tissue Eng. 2006, 12,
2407–2424. [
CrossRef
]
85.
O’Brien, F.J. Biomaterials & sca
ffolds for tissue engineering. Mater. Today 2011, 14, 88–95. [
CrossRef
]
86.
Chaudhari, A.A.; Vig, K.; Baganizi, D.R.; Sahu, R.; Dixit, S.; Dennis, V.; Singh, S.R.; Pillai, S.R. Future prospects
for sca
ffolding methods and biomaterials in skin tissue engineering: A review. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17, 1974.
[
CrossRef
] [
PubMed
]
87.
Chen, L.J.; Wang, M. Production and evaluation of biodegradable composites based on PHB-PHV copolymer.
Biomaterials 2002, 23, 2631–2639. [
CrossRef
]
88.
Hynes, R.O. The extracellular matrix: Not just pretty fibrils. Science 2009, 326, 1216–1219. [
CrossRef
]
89.
Bonnans, C.; Chou, J.; Werb, Z. Remodelling the extracellular matrix in development and disease. Nat. Rev.
Mol. Cell Biol. 2014, 15, 786–801. [
CrossRef
]
90.
Blackstone, B.N.; Hahn, J.M.; McFarland, K.L.; DeBruler, D.M.; Supp, D.M.; Powell, H.M. Inflammatory
response and biomechanical properties of coaxial sca
ffolds for engineered skin in vitro and post-grafting.
Acta Biomater. 2018, 80, 247–257. [
CrossRef
]
91.
Scotchford, C.A.; Ball, M.; Winkelmann, M.; Vörös, J.; Csucs, C.; Brunette, D.M.; Danuser, G.; Textor, M.
Chemically patterned, metal-oxide-based surfaces produced by photolithographic techniques for studying
protein- and cell-interactions. II: Protein adsorption and early cell interactions. Biomaterials 2003, 24,
1147–1158.
92.
Ohara, P.T.; Buck, R.C. Contact guidance in vitro: A light, transmission, and scanning electron microscopic
study. Exp. Cell Res. 1979, 121, 235–249. [
CrossRef
]
93.
Oakley, C.; Brunette, D.M. The sequence of alignment of microtubules, focal contacts and actin filaments in
fibroblasts spreading on smooth and grooved titanium substrata. J. Cell Sci. 1993, 106, 343–354. [
PubMed
]
94.
Jacquemoud, C.; Bruyere-Garnier, K.; Coret, M. Methodology to determine failure characteristics of planar
soft tissues using a dynamic tensile test. J. Biomech. 2007, 40, 468–475. [
CrossRef
] [
PubMed
]
95.
Abdelaal, O.A.M.; Darwish, S.M.M. Review of Rapid Prototyping Techniques for Tissue Engineering Sca
ffolds
Fabrication. In Characterization and Development of Biosystems and Biomaterials; Springer: Berlin
/Heidelberg,
Germany, 2013; Volume 29. [
CrossRef
]
96.
Agrawal, G.; Negi, Y.S.; Pradhan, S.; Dash, M.; Samal, S.K. Wettability and contact angle of polymeric
biomaterials. In Characterization of Polymeric Biomaterials; Elsevier Ltd.: Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 2017;
pp. 57–81. [
CrossRef
]
97.
Eltom, A.; Zhong, G.; Muhammad, A. Sca
ffold Techniques and Designs in Tissue Engineering Functions and
Purposes: A Review. Adv. Mater. Sci. Eng. 2019, 2019, 3429527. [
CrossRef
]
98.
Lee, E.J.; Kasper, F.K.; Mikos, A.G. Biomaterials for tissue engineering. Ann. Biomed. Eng. 2014, 42, 323–337.
[
CrossRef
]
99.
Ferri, J.M.; Jordá, J.; Montanes, N.; Fenollar, O.; Balart, R. Manufacturing and characterization of poly(lactic
acid) composites with hydroxyapatite. J. Thermoplast. Compos. Mater. 2018, 31, 865–881. [
CrossRef
]
100. Matthews, J.A.; Wnek, G.E.; Simpson, D.G.; Bowlin, G.L. Electrospinning of collagen nanofibers.
Biomacromolecules 2002, 3, 232–238. [
CrossRef
]
101. Mota, A.; Sahebghadam Lotfi, A.; Barzin, J.; Hatam, M.; Adibi, B.; Khalaj, Z.; Massumi, M. Human Bone
Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell Behaviors on PCL
/Gelatin Nanofibrous Scaffolds Modified with A Collagen
IV-Derived RGD-Containing Peptide. Cell J. 2014, 16, 1–10.
102. Anitua, E.; Nurden, P.; Prado, R.; Nurden, A.T.; Padilla, S. Autologous fibrin sca
ffolds: When platelet- and
plasma-derived biomolecules meet fibrin. Biomaterials 2019, 192, 440–460. [
CrossRef
]
103. Kober, J.; Gugerell, A.; Schmid, M.; Kamolz, L.-P.; Keck, M. Generation of a Fibrin Based Three-Layered Skin
Substitute. BioMed Res. Int. 2015, 2015, 170427. [
CrossRef
]
104. Ohto-Fujita, E.; Konno, T.; Shimizu, M.; Ishihara, K.; Sugitate, T.; Miyake, J.; Yoshimura, K.; Taniwaki, K.;
Sakurai, T.; Hasebe, Y.; et al. Hydrolyzed eggshell membrane immobilized on phosphorylcholine polymer
supplies extracellular matrix environment for human dermal fibroblasts. Cell Tissue Res. 2011, 345, 177–190.
[
CrossRef
]
105. Lehtovaara, B.C.; Gu, F.X. Pharmacological, structural, and drug delivery properties and applications of
1,3-
β-glucans. J. Agric. Food Chem. 2011, 59, 6813–6828. [
CrossRef
] [
PubMed
]
106. Fu, L.; Zhou, P.; Zhang, S.; Yang, G. Evaluation of bacterial nanocellulose-based uniform wound dressing for
large area skin transplantation. Mater. Sci. Eng. C 2013, 33, 2995–3000. [
CrossRef
] [
PubMed
]


Pharmaceutics 2020, 12, 735
30 of 30
107. Li, M.; Han, M.; Sun, Y.; Hua, Y.; Chen, G.; Zhang, L. Oligoarginine mediated collagen
/chitosan gel composite
for cutaneous wound healing. Int. J. Biol. Macromol. 2019, 122, 1120–1127. [
CrossRef
]
108. Bai, R.G.; Muthoosamy, K.; Manickam, S.; Hilal-Alnaqbi, A. Graphene-based 3D sca
ffolds in tissue engineering:
Fabrication, applications, and future scope in liver tissue engineering. Int. J. Nanomed. 2019, 14, 5753–5783.
109. Brouki Milan, P.; Pazouki, A.; Joghataei, M.T.; Mozafari, M.; Amini, N.; Kargozar, S.; Amoupour, M.; Latifi, N.;
Samadikuchaksaraei, A. Decellularization and preservation of human skin: A platform for tissue engineering
and reconstructive surgery. Methods 2020, 171, 62–67. [
CrossRef
] [
PubMed
]
110. Jafarkhani, M.; Salehi, Z.; Bagheri, Z.; Aayanifard, Z.; Rezvan, A.; Doosthosseini, H.; Shokrgozar, M.A.
Graphene functionalized decellularized sca
ffold promotes skin cell proliferation. Can. J. Chem. Eng. 2020, 98,
62–68. [
CrossRef
]
111. Joseph, B.; Augustine, R.; Kalarikkal, N.; Thomas, S.; Seantier, B.; Grohens, Y. Recent advances in electrospun
polycaprolactone based sca
ffolds for wound healing and skin bioengineering applications. Mater. Today
Commun. 2019, 19, 319–335. [
CrossRef
]
112. Duan, H.; Feng, B.; Guo, X.; Wang, J.; Zhao, L.; Zhou, G.; Liu, W.; Cao, Y.; Zhang, W.J. Engineering of
epidermis skin grafts using electrospun nanofibrous gelatin
/polycaprolactone membranes. Int. J. Nanomed.
2013
, 8, 2077–2084.
113. Pisani, S.; Dorati, R.; Chiesa, E.; Genta, I.; Modena, T.; Bruni, G.; Grisoli, P.; Conti, B. Release profile of
gentamicin sulfate from polylactide-co-polycaprolactone electrospun nanofiber matrices. Pharmaceutics 2019,
11, 161. [
CrossRef
]
114. Thomas, R.; Soumya, K.R.; Mathew, J.; Radhakrishnan, E.K. Electrospun Polycaprolactone Membrane
Incorporated with Biosynthesized Silver Nanoparticles as E
ffective Wound Dressing Material. Appl. Biochem.
Biotechnol. 2015, 176, 2213–2224. [
CrossRef
] [
PubMed
]
115. Leu, J.-G.; Chen, S.-A.; Chen, H.-M.; Wu, W.-M.; Hung, C.-F.; Yao, Y.-D.; Tu, C.-S.; Liang, Y.-J. The e
ffects of
gold nanoparticles in wound healing with antioxidant epigallocatechin gallate and
α-lipoic acid. Nanomed.
Nanotechnol. Biol. Med. 2012, 8, 767–775. [
CrossRef
] [
PubMed
]
116. Yang, X.; Yang, J.; Wang, L.; Ran, B.; Jia, Y.; Zhang, L.; Yang, G.; Shao, H.; Jiang, X. Pharmaceutical
Intermediate-Modified Gold Nanoparticles: Against Multidrug-Resistant Bacteria and Wound-Healing
Application via an Electrospun Sca
ffold. ACS Nano 2017, 11, 5737–5745. [
CrossRef
] [
PubMed
]
117. Mironov, V.; Visconti, R.P.; Kasyanov, V.; Forgacs, G.; Drake, C.J.; Markwald, R.R. Organ printing: Tissue
spheroids as building blocks. Biomaterials 2009, 30, 2164–2174. [
CrossRef
]
118. Guillemot, F.; Mironov, V.; Nakamura, M. Bioprinting is coming of age: Report from the International
Conference on Bioprinting and Biofabrication in Bordeaux (3B’09). Biofabrication 2010, 2, 10201. [
CrossRef
]
119. Singh, D.; Singh, D.; Han, S.S. 3D Printing of Sca
ffold for Cells Delivery: Advances in Skin Tissue Engineering.
Polymers 2016, 8, 19. [
CrossRef
]
120. Hajdu, Z.; Mironov, V.; Mehesz, A.N.; Norris, R.A.; Markwald, R.R.; Visconti, R.P. Tissue spheroid fusion-based
in vitro screening assays for analysis of tissue maturation. J. Tissue Eng. Regen. Med. 2010, 4, 659–664. [
CrossRef
]
121. Baltazar, T.; Merola, J.; Catarino, C.; Xie, C.B.; Kirkiles-Smith, N.C.; Lee, V.; Hotta, S.; Dai, G.; Xu, X.;
Ferreira, F.C.; et al. Three Dimensional Bioprinting of a Vascularized and Perfusable Skin Graft Using Human
Keratinocytes, Fibroblasts, Pericytes, and Endothelial Cells. Tissue Eng. Part A 2020, 26, 227–238. [
CrossRef
]
122. Won, J.-Y.; Lee, M.-H.; Kim, M.-J.; Min, K.-H.; Ahn, G.; Han, J.-S.; Jin, S.; Yun, W.-S.; Shim, J.-H. A potential
dermal substitute using decellularized dermis extracellular matrix derived bio-ink. Artif. Cells Nanomed.
Biotechnol. 2019, 47, 644–649. [
CrossRef
]
123. Akita, S.; Tanaka, K.; Hirano, A. Lower extremity reconstruction after necrotising fasciitis and necrotic skin
lesions using a porcine-derived skin substitute. JPRAS 2006, 59, 759–763.
124. Chen, H.-C.; Hu, Y.-C. Bioreactors for tissue engineering. Biotechnol. Lett. 2006, 28, 1415–1423. [
CrossRef
]
[
PubMed
]
125. Navarro, J.; Swayambunathan, J.; Janes, M.E.; Santoro, M.; Mikos, A.G.; Fisher, J.P. Dual-chambered
membrane bioreactor for coculture of stratified cell populations. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2019, 116, 3253–3268.
[
CrossRef
] [
PubMed
]
© 2020 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access
article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution
(CC BY) license (http:
//creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).


Baixar 2.23 Mb.

Compartilhe com seus amigos:
1   ...   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   18




©historiapt.info 2022
enviar mensagem

    Página principal