Skin Wound Healing Process and New Emerging Technologies for Skin Wound Care and Regeneration



Baixar 2.23 Mb.
Pdf preview
Página14/18
Encontro26.07.2022
Tamanho2.23 Mb.
#24374
1   ...   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   18
pharmaceutics-12-00735
Figure 5. Hydrogel approach. Mixtures of biomaterial solutions, for example, chitosan, cellulose, 
polyethylene glycol, poly-caprolactone, etc., are mixed with the skin cells to generate hydrogel 
scaffolds. 
Emergence of 3D Bioprinting for Skin Regeneration 
Three-dimensional bioprinting is a promising technology for skin regeneration; it is applied to 
produce bio-artificial skin by the stratification of autologous cells previously isolated and 
proliferated in a laboratory. The stratification can be achieved by using a 3D scaffold, or cell 
spheroids. This technology allows us to control the geometry at the micro/nano-cellular level, which 
is essential for modulating cell–substrate and cell–cell interactions. This methodology could be 
particularly valuable for skin tissue engineering, as it allows to accurately lying out a multilayer 3D 
scaffold engineered by layer-by-layer technology, assembling different cells. 
The biomimetic technique is defined as a biological-inspired technique and it is employed to 
imitate different functional cellular elements, such as multilayer skin and vascular system branching 
[86]. A thorough knowledge and the collaboration of imaging, biomaterials, biophysics, engineering, 
medicine, and cell biology are required to achieve a significant breakthrough using this approach. 
A knowledge of organogenesis, together with ability to manipulate the microenvironment to 
force cell differentiation and bioprinted tissue production, have allowed the development of 
Figure 5.
Hydrogel approach. Mixtures of biomaterial solutions, for example, chitosan, cellulose,
polyethylene glycol, poly-caprolactone, etc., are mixed with the skin cells to generate hydrogel sca
ffolds.
Some of the most important and characteristic aspects of 3D bioprinting area as follows.
Drop-on-demand: this consists of the possibility to deposit drops of bioink through a computerized
control system, only when and where necessary to recreate an image or a desired sequence. It also allows
the control of density and the very high customization of the cell solution deposition. The resolution of


Pharmaceutics 2020, 12, 735
22 of 30
the final product depends on the print head, the minimum size of the droplets and their capability on
the surface [
119
].
Solid freeform fabrication: bioprinting has no limitations on the shape and consistency of
the desired structure. By the automatic processing of computer-aided design (CAD) images and
computer-aided manufacturing (CAM), it is possible to realize complex 3D structures from data
and images from medical investigations, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed
tomography (CT). Such images can be processed with technologies such as Rapid Prototyping (RP) or
Solid Freeform Fabrication (SFF) that allow the computer to predefine the microscopic and macroscopic
shape of the sca
ffold [
120
]. Layer-by-layer: bioink drops are deposited on the first biopaper layer, after
which another biopaper layer is superimposed, which, in turn, is seeded with cells. By iterating this
process, a 3D structure is formed, consisting of a 2D sheets of biopaper, which, by merging together,
will form a single system [
119
].
The production of bioink is divided into two steps: cell culture and the preparation of bioink
itself. Moreover, another innovative feature of 3D bioprinting is the newly developed, temporary
and bioabsorbable (biopaper) sca
ffold. Biopaper is a support surface where cells can be seeded
until they have fused, multiplied and organized into a real tissue. In addition, biopaper must
encourage a continuous and constant supply of nutrients and oxygen to cells. From a structural point
of view, it is usually composed of hydrogels that simulate the cellular environment; the hydrogel
material can be from synthetic or natural polymers. Biopaper is presented in liquid form but, after
being laid, it changes to a solid–gelatinous consistency [
86
]. There are many hydrogel compositions
that are used in 3D bioprinting to incorporate and provide cells for skin repair; those of natural
origin use mainly alginate, collagen type I, HA and chitosan, while those of synthetic origin employ
polyvinyl alcohol PVA), polyethylene glycol (PEG), polycaprolactone (PCL), polylactic acid polymers
(PLA) and their compounds [
14
]. Three-dimensional bioprinting can be used to generate multi-layer
vascularized human skin grafts that can potentially exceed the survival limits of the grafts observed
in current avascular skin replacements. In a study conducted by Baltazar and colleagues, it was
shown that 3D bioprinting succeeded in fabricating vascularized human skin in vitro from human
cells, with morphological and biological similarity to in vivo human skin. An implantable skin
graft, including a perfusable microvascular system, was obtained by 3D printing; the prototype was
made by combining a bioink with foreskin dermal fibroblasts (FBs) and human endothelial cells
(ECs), with a second bioink including foreskin keratinocytes (KCs) to form the dermis and epidermis,
respectively [
121
]. Won and colleagues conducted another innovative study on decellularized ECM
derived from a pig dermis; the authors obtained a printable bio-ink that was mixed with human
dermal fibroblasts (HDFs) to produce a construct loaded with human cells. The residual ECM
containing collagen and GAG, as well as bioactive molecules and growth factors, provided cells with
an environment identical to that in the tissue, helping with the viability and proliferation of HDF in
the construct [
122
].
Emergence of 3D Bioprinting for Skin Regeneration
Three-dimensional bioprinting is a promising technology for skin regeneration; it is applied to
produce bio-artificial skin by the stratification of autologous cells previously isolated and proliferated in
a laboratory. The stratification can be achieved by using a 3D sca
ffold, or cell spheroids. This technology
allows us to control the geometry at the micro
/nano-cellular level, which is essential for modulating
cell–substrate and cell–cell interactions. This methodology could be particularly valuable for skin tissue
engineering, as it allows to accurately lying out a multilayer 3D sca
ffold engineered by layer-by-layer
technology, assembling di
fferent cells.
The biomimetic technique is defined as a biological-inspired technique and it is employed to imitate
di
fferent functional cellular elements, such as multilayer skin and vascular system branching [
86
].
A thorough knowledge and the collaboration of imaging, biomaterials, biophysics, engineering,
medicine, and cell biology are required to achieve a significant breakthrough using this approach.


Pharmaceutics 2020, 12, 735
23 of 30
A knowledge of organogenesis, together with ability to manipulate the microenvironment to
force cell di
fferentiation and bioprinted tissue production, have allowed the development of cutaneous
tissue through autonomous self-assembly, a technique able to reproduce a biological tissue following
the map of embryonic development. This technique involves the 3D bioprinting of cell spheroids,
which undergo cell fusion and cell reorganization, to mimic the architecture of the developing tissue.
Spheroids can vary in size, depending on the parameters set by the user. Their complete biological
function depends directly on the cells that secrete their ECM component, following the signaling
pathways for histogenesis, and on the localization process.
Mini tissue has been proposed as an alternative self-assembling approach. In this context,
3D bioprinting is exploited to form macro-constructs, assembling mini tissue based on cellular
spheroids [
123
].
In general, tissue engineering shows infinite potentialities, but several constraints still need to be
addressed. The design of a complex hierarchical structure engineered with di
fferent cells is ongoing
and challenging; a few technologies have emerged, such as assisted laser bioprinting (LaBP) and
laser-induced transfer (LIFT), for producing 2D and 3D constructs incorporating di
fferent cell lines.
LIFT technology was used for assembling fibroblasts
/keratinocytes and MSCs in a single 3D construct;
the impact of the production phase was estimated by quantifying the cell survival rate, cell surface
marker changes and DNA damage. The data demonstrated that fibroblasts, keratinocytes and human
mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were able to survive during the production phase, and they retained
their proliferation ability with no evidence of DNA or surface marker alterations [
86
].
6.4. Bioreactors
Bioreactors are devices where biological and
/or biochemical processes take place under carefully
and strictly controlled operating and environmental conditions (pH, temperature, pressure, feeding,
and removal of waste products).
In these systems, cell-engineered sca
ffolds complete their
cellularization before being implanted. Compared to the progress that has been made in the design of
sca
ffolds, much progress has also been made in bioreactors, especially for creating devices capable
of overcoming limitations to nutrients and oxygen transport that hinder the achievement of in vitro
engineered tissues suitable for clinical applications. Bioreactors are used either in the engineered tissue
maturation phase or during cell seeding, in order to overcome static seeding limits that preclude a
uniform cell distribution along the entire sca
ffold thickness. The bioreactor provides an important step
towards the achievement of functional grafts; it e
fficiently supports cell nourishment and, if combined
with mechanical stimuli application, it directs cell activity, cell functions and di
fferentiation. In addition,
bioreactors o
ffer well-defined culture conditions that are useful for systematic and controlled cell
di
fferentiation and tissue development studies (Figure
4
). Computational modeling and experimental
tests were used to study transport phenomena within the bioreactor [
124
]. In a study conducted
by Navarro and colleagues, the authors developed a dual-chambered membrane bioreactor for the
co-culture of stratified cell populations (DCB) to study 3D-stratified cell populations for skin tissue
engineering. DCB provides adjacent flow lines within the chamber and the included membrane
regulates stratification and flow mixing. This system can be exploited to produce cell population layers
or gradients in sca
ffolds [
125
].

Baixar 2.23 Mb.

Compartilhe com seus amigos:
1   ...   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   18




©historiapt.info 2023
enviar mensagem

    Página principal