Skin Wound Healing Process and New Emerging Technologies for Skin Wound Care and Regeneration


 Sca ffolds for Skin Tissue Engineering and Cutting-Edge Techniques for their Manufacturing



Baixar 2.23 Mb.
Pdf preview
Página13/18
Encontro26.07.2022
Tamanho2.23 Mb.
#24374
1   ...   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   18
pharmaceutics-12-00735
6. Sca
ffolds for Skin Tissue Engineering and Cutting-Edge Techniques for their Manufacturing
Several technologies such as phase separation, solvent casting and particulate leaching, membrane
lamination, melt molding and high-pressure processes have been studied and proposed for producing
3D sca
ffolds. Below, those recognized as the most innovative ones are described.
Sca
ffold-free skin equivalents are a promising approach for exploiting cellular functions and their
secreted ECMs. Sca
ffold-free skin equivalents can be produced by cell sheet technology, which is one
of the most advanced methodologies due to its process simplicity and versatility; moreover, the final
product is characterized by excellent compatibility with native skin tissue, and poor foreign body
rejection. The sca
ffold-free skin equivalents address several technical challenges such as prolonged
in vitro culture incubation and limited implantation volume, as well as intrinsic physical weakness
and poor vascularity [
14
]. Therefore, biomaterials and tissue engineering technologies have been
introduced to overcome these issues.
6.1. Cell-Free Sca
ffold
Cell-free sca
ffolds are fabricated by decellularization techniques using either chemical, physical
or enzymatic degradation, including repeated freeze–thaw cycles, hypertonic or hypotonic and
trypsin
/EDTA treatment, etc. [
14
]. The human dermis decellularization procedure allows us to
achieve good biocompatibility and less immunogenicity in dermal replacement; nevertheless, it is
well demonstrated that the decellularization protocol negatively influences the matrix structure and
orientation. High concentrations of detergents and enzymes are employed and, following washing
steps, are required to remove the residuals. Milan and colleagues showed an innovative approach
to address the issue related to standard decellularized protocols. They used an optimized surfactant
(n-octyl-beta-D-glucopyranoside) at low concentrations as a tissue pretreatment to avoid enzyme
digestion and preserve ECM. This optimized and facilitated cell membrane structure removal and
lipid and protein solubilization [
109
].
Decellularized animal tissues represent a valid alternative for overcoming the limits of human
donor availability. Jafarkhani and colleagues obtained a decellularized sca
ffold from a bovine heart;
the cell-free prototype was also functionalized with graphene oxide (GO) and engineered with skin cell
lines (NIH
/swiss mouse embryo fibroblast cells, NIH 3T3). The in vitro results proved the capability of
the prototype sca
ffold to form a microenvironment for cell proliferation, differentiation, migration and
gene expression and the authors demonstrated its applicability and suitability as a support material
for tissue engineering [
110
].


Pharmaceutics 2020, 12, 735
20 of 30
6.2. Electrospun Sca
ffolds
Electrospinning is a cutting-edge technology that allows us to e
ffectively produce ultra-thin
fibers with diameters ranging from submicrons to a few nanometers. Briefly, an electrically charged
polymer solution is forced to pass through a nozzle and is influenced by an electric field. When
a su
fficient voltage is achieved between the nozzle and metallic collector, the liquid droplet at the
nozzle becomes charged and opportunely stretched in a continuous jet. The jet travels to the collector,
and it dries out in flight [
111
]. Electrospun sca
ffolds resemble native ECM design, variable pore
size, high surface area and oxygen permeability, making them suitable as skin replacement materials.
Moreover, nanofibers can be loaded with bioactive substances, namely growth factors, nanoparticles,
antimicrobials, anti-inflammatory agents and wound healing drugs. Several natural and synthetic
polymers, as well as blends containing them, have been studied for producing electrospun nanofibrous
membranes, such as gelatin and polycaprolactone blending [
112
]. Nanotechnology can also be exploited
for creating innovative drug delivery systems, designed to achieve a controlled release of an active
agent. Electrospun nanofibers showed promising results for the local release of antibiotics, preventing
bacterial biofilm formation and limiting antibiotic resistance. Antibiotic-loaded electrospun matrices
could be applied in several applications: severe burns, gingival cavities for local infection treatment or
for preventing post tooth explant infection, to name a few. Antibiotic-loaded electrospun matrices allow
us to reach high antibiotic concentrations at the site of infection, avoiding high system concentrations
and related side e
ffects. Moreover, the administration frequency is reduced and, consequently, patient
compliance enhanced [
113
].
The antibacterial activities of metal oxide nanoparticles are well known and they can be loaded in
electrospun matrices for incremental wound healing. Metal oxide nanoparticles inhibit bacterial growth,
producing reactive oxygen species (ROS) that cause detrimental oxidative stress. ROS concentration
can play a key role in cell proliferation and migration, apoptosis, and wound healing. Several metals
(silver, gold, etc.) and metal oxide nanoparticles (titanium and zinc oxide) have been extensively
studied for their wound healing and microbicidal properties.
The bioactivity of PCL fibers was improved by incorporating metal hydroxide nanoparticles such
as europium hydroxide (EHN); the nanoparticulate system enhanced both endothelial cell density
and cell growth. The blending of metal hydroxide nanoparticles and PCL polymers is a promising
approach for promoting cell proliferation as well as blood vessel formation and wound healing
rate. It was also demonstrated that nanoparticles based on silver (AgNPs) inhibit the growth of
Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus haemolyticus [
114
], and electrospun membranes containing
silver nanoparticles exhibit microbicidal activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria
strains. Moreover, gold nanoparticles, due to their intrinsic antioxidant properties, were beneficial for
cutaneous wound repair [
115
]. PCL
/gelatin nanofibrous membranes containing 6-aminopenicillanic
acid (APA) and gold nanoparticles (Au-APA) showed good healing properties and antibacterial activity
against multidrug-resistant bacteria [
116
].
6.3. Three-Dimensional Bioprinting
Traditional sca
ffolds are substrates where cells can adhere to proliferate, and their porous
conformation is an ideal cell deposition environment. In spite of these benefits, the use of traditional
sca
ffolds has some limitations: the vascularization of engineered tissues; correct and precise cell
deposition in the porous structure of the sca
ffold; and the stiffness of the support matrix. Moreover,
an inflammatory process occurring during the degradation of a biodegradable sca
ffold can sometimes
limit the new tissue growth rate. Overall, it is practically impossible, via traditional techniques,
to obtain tissues formed by layers of di
fferent cell densities that simulate the complexity of a multi-tissue
structure [
117
]. It is therefore clear that these limitations are intrinsic in the use of traditional sca
ffolds
as supports for tissue growth. Three-dimensional bioprinting is an emerging technique for engineering
biological constructs that involves dispensing cells into a biocompatible matrix (bioink) using sequential
layer-by-layer computer-aided design (CAD) and generates a tissue-like 3D structure. The technique


Pharmaceutics 2020, 12, 735
21 of 30
can overcome several drawbacks of traditional sca
ffold manufacturing techniques, but its immediate
novelty is its ability to generate an engineered tissue in a single-step process [
118
]. Three-dimensional
bioprinting processes include magnetic bioprinting, stereolithography, photolithography, and direct
cell extrusion. Briefly, cells are retrieved from the patient and proliferate in vivo. Before seeding, cells
are phenotypically characterized and suspended in culture media and in a biomaterial solution to
get a suitable bioink. The bioink is then printed based on a medical scan of the patient (Figure
5
).
The engineered construct is incubated in a bioreactor, ensuring proper nutrients and gas flow for the
maturation of the engineered construct into functional tissue [
119
].
Pharmaceutics 202012, x FOR PEER REVIEW 
22 of 30 

Baixar 2.23 Mb.

Compartilhe com seus amigos:
1   ...   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   18




©historiapt.info 2022
enviar mensagem

    Página principal