Skin Wound Healing Process and New Emerging Technologies for Skin Wound Care and Regeneration


 Skin Regeneration Process and Skin Regeneration Therapies



Baixar 2.23 Mb.
Pdf preview
Página10/18
Encontro26.07.2022
Tamanho2.23 Mb.
#24374
1   ...   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   ...   18
pharmaceutics-12-00735
4. Skin Regeneration Process and Skin Regeneration Therapies
4.1. Di
fference between Wound Healing and Regeneration Process
The use of skin grafts is needed for replacing surface deficits that cannot be resolved by a simple
approximation of wound margins. Grafts are invasive procedures that can expose the patient to serious
complications; for this reason, they are carried out only when there are no alternatives such as ADs [
57
].
The challenge to overcome the current barriers associated with wound care requires innovative
management techniques, such as regenerative medicine. Regenerative medicine is a new area of
medical science, aimed at improving the regeneration process through a multidisciplinary approach
focused both on problem solving through a reparative approach, and on remedying deficiencies
related to the physiological process of wound healing [
58
]. In less phylogenetically evolved animals,
regeneration is a physiological process; many larval and adult animals are able to regenerate large
sections of their body plan after transection or amputation [
59
]; unfortunately, in humans, this occurs
only during the first part of intrauterine life.
Regenerative medicine studies provide a number of opportunities to accelerate and promote wound
healing. Growth factors, stem cells and biomaterials can be applied directly to induce regeneration or
indirectly change the wound environment and stimulate healing. This multidisciplinary approach
opens up future perspectives for tissue regeneration. Collaboration is fundamental to connect clinicians
with scientific engineering skills to commercial teams and to guide new technologies towards a safe
and e
ffective implementation [
60
]. The criteria proposed by all di
fferent disciplines can be analyzed
individually, and must then be clustered and clinically evaluated in the interest of combining patient
needs with the available technologies. Safety is a clear priority in clinical practice and a best-fit risk
analysis must include attention to diseases and treatments o
ffered by regenerative medicine. The site
of lesion the should be the target for aesthetic and functional considerations, considering the broad
variability of the skin in di
fferent body districts. The timely clinical availability of these treatments is a
key factor, especially for acute damage or injuries that endanger a patient’s life. The economic factor is
also an important element; high-quality outcomes are crucial to justify the costs of new technologies.
Finally, it should be considered that, now, there is no complete solution for skin regeneration, given its
structural and functional complexity. However, collaboration among di
fferent disciplines provides a
real opportunity to improve the clinical care of di
fficult wounds.


Pharmaceutics 2020, 12, 735
11 of 30
4.2. Therapeutic Potential of Regenerative Medicine in Wound Healing
Key components of regenerative medicine, such as growth factors, autologous cells and stem cells,
gene therapy and tissue engineering, can be used to address di
fferent stages of wound healing. Several
approaches, such as angiogenesis, immune modulation, cell proliferation and extracellular matrix
deposition (ECM) can be exploited to induce regeneration.
4.2.1. Growth Factors Involved in Stimulating Wound Healing
The tissue repair process is controlled by the interaction of growth factors with specific cell
surface receptors; these interactions stimulate cell migration, trigger angiogenesis, epithelialization,
and encourage matrix formation and the remodeling of the injured site [
61
]. Several growth factor
families were investigated for wound healing, such as epidermal growth factor (EGF), fibroblast growth
factor (FGF), transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ), and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF).
There is also emerging evidence of the role of stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1) in regulating
epidermal cell migration and proliferation during wound repair [
58
].
EGF is secreted by platelets, macrophages and fibroblasts and it plays an important role in
epithelialization. FGF is produced by keratinocytes, mast cells, fibroblasts, endothelial cells, smooth
muscle cells and chondrocytes; it promotes granulation tissue formation, epithelialization and matrix
formation [
62
]. Platelets, keratinocytes, macrophages, lymphocytes and fibroblasts produce TGFβ,
which is crucial in inflammation, granulation tissue formation, epithelialization, and matrix formation
and remodeling. PDGF is produced by platelets, keratinocytes, macrophages, endothelial cells and
fibroblasts and also plays a role in each stage of wound healing [
63
].
Pierce et al. revealed that both PDGF and TGFβ accelerated in vivo wound repair, but through
specific mechanisms. Briefly, PDGF is involved in macrophages and fibroblasts’ chemo-attraction and
stimulates them to express growth factors, including TGFβ [
64
]. The role of each growth factor in
wound repair has been proven by several researchers; in addition, some studies verified the potential
of using growth factors in combination and carriers for their delivery to maximize wound healing [
58
].
Although the topical application of growth factors was shown to accelerate wound healing, there are
barriers to their therapeutic application. These factors undergo rapid degradation from proteolytic
factors; many studies aim to find the correct combination of biomaterials and growth factors in order
to formulate a suitable carrier for preserving growth factor integrity and stability. As wound repair
is a dynamic process, it remains to be clarified whether the provision of growth factors should be
sustained or transient, and how long they are required for an extensive repairing. Furthermore, there
is much interplay between cells and components of the wound healing cascade. The challenge is
to combine di
fferent growth factors and relate them to a specific injury environment. A dynamic
environment, such as the one occurring in the naturally driven wound healing process, could be a
promising approach to ensure an e
ffective combination treatment [
61
].
4.2.2. Cellular Skin Substitutes
Cellular skin substitutes have shown great potential by providing all the elements needed for
skin regeneration, such as cells, mediators and materials mimicking ECM [
65
]. Viable cells should be
cultured in special conditions in order to prevent ECM damage during cell sheet substitute production,
and treatment with trypsin should be avoided [
66
]. Human skin cells, fibroblasts and keratinocytes are
primary sources of dermal substitute production. Fibroblasts are dermal cells and are responsible for the
synthesis of most of ECM structural components (e.g., collagen, elastin, laminin and glycosaminoglycan).
As for keratinocytes, they are cellular components of the epidermis and look di
fferent depending on the
stage of their maturation process; in addition, they play a protective function, representing an e
ffective
defensive barrier against the external environment. Therefore, specific cell composition constructs have
been developed according to the treatment target, such as engineered constructs based on keratinocytes,
intended for epidermal regeneration or based on fibroblasts, for dermal regeneration. In addition,


Pharmaceutics 2020, 12, 735
12 of 30
fibroblasts and keratinocytes communicate with each other through a paracrine crosstalk that leads to
cell recruitment, which is required for complete wound closure. For this purpose, double-layer dermal
cellular substitutes have been produced, containing both fibroblasts and keratinocytes, for the repair
and regeneration of skin-deep wounds. When applied to the wound site, cells provide signal molecules,
growth factors, and extracellular matrix proteins supporting skin tissue regeneration. Commercially
available products incorporate keratinocytes (e.g., Epicel), fibroblasts (e.g., Dermagraft
®
) or both
keratinocytes and fibroblasts (e.g., Apligraf
®
) [
14
]. The novelty of these products is their capability to
promote skin regeneration as a function of their structure and composition. The most used matrix is
based on collagen, which is totally biocompatible and biodegradable. In most cases, collagen comes
from carefully selected cattle (to avoid bovine spongiform encephalopathy). After being derived
from bovine tendons, collagen undergoes processes of purification from cells, DNA, RNA and all
proteins, with the exception of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) which allows its long-term permanence
in the wound bed; moreover, GAGs help to contain inflammation and to maintain a proper osmotic
gradient. Subsequently, the purified collagen undergoes changes that involve immunogenic telopeptide
deletion. Atelocollagen is important for many pro-regenerative actions; it acts as a real biological
modulator of the environment when injected, favoring regenerative processes. The sca
ffold should
be assembled according to its specific conformation and structure; in particular, pore sizes and their
distribution are essential to providing a suitable matrix for e
ffective cell migration and arrangement.
These sca
ffolds represent a basis for revascularization, forming a proper microenvironment for cell
migration and proliferation [
67
]. An example of a complete skin replacement is Apligraf, a bi-layered
bioengineered skin substitute and the first engineered skin substitute approved by the US Food and
Drug Administration (FDA) to promote the healing of ulcers that have failed standard wound care.
It is obtained by stratifying human foreskin-derived neonatal fibroblasts in a bovine type I collagen
matrix and human foreskin-derived neonatal epidermal keratinocytes. Apligraf provides both cells
and a matrix for non-healing wounds, producing cytokines and growth factors similarly to healthy
human skin; however, its exact mechanism of action is still unknown [
68
]. In addition, these devices
can be equipped with covering components consisting of breathable material to protect the skin during
the regeneration process; it should be borne in mind that cellular skin substitutes cannot be applied to
all chronic injuries as special wound bed conditions are needed to achieve optimal e
ffectiveness.
The high risk of morbidity along with limits in donor sites restrict the use of autologous skin
cells for extensive wound healing. In this context, stem cells (SC) are a promising alternative since
they have a self-renewal capacity, multi-lineage di
fferentiation potential and they can be retrieved
from several tissues, such as embryonic, fetal and adult tissues. Epidermal stem cells (EpSC) and their
progenitors could be an attractive source in wound therapies since they are included in the epidermal
basal layer and terminal hair follicles. EpSCs and related progenitors could be considered sources of
autologous cells for chronic wounds [
69
]. Adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) and adipocytes were
widely investigated in wound healing; Kim and colleagues investigated the wound healing e
ffect of
ADSCs, both in vitro and in vivo, on acute wounds [
70
]. In vitro testing proved ADSCs with the ability
to promote the proliferation and migration of human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs) through cell-to-cell
interactions and paracrine activation mediated by secretory factors Moreover, an in vivo experiment
on nude mice presented a significant reduction in wound size and rapid epithelialization from the
wound edges after 7 days after ADSC treatment.
Their safety and easy isolation procedures make MSCs a great alternative for wound regeneration;
MSCs retrieved from skin, fat and bone marrow have shown promising evidence of accelerating the
healing process in both acute and chronic wounds [
58
]. Moreover, MSCs allow the regeneration
of skin appendages, such as hair follicles, sweat glands and microvessels. MSCs speed up wound
healing processes and increase healing outcome quality through direct di
fferentiation and cell paracrine
signaling [
71
]. They increase angiogenesis, modulate inflammatory response and scarring [
72
]; wound
closure is promoted by accelerating the recruitment of macrophages and endothelial cells mediated by
pro-angiogenic cytokine production (vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), hepatocyte growth


Pharmaceutics 2020, 12, 735
13 of 30
factor (HGF) and fibroblasts and fibroblast growth factor (bFGF)), as well as the migration of fibroblasts
and keratinocytes into wound bed. The Rigenera protocol is an example of the potential provided by
SCs, specifically MSCs and their progenitors, as this protocol is used to fragment autologous connective
tissue in several species and to select specific cell populations including MSCs and their progenitors.
Cells preserve their di
fferentiation capability, and they stimulate the activity of quiescent SC niches
located into and surrounding the wound bed, regenerating impaired tissue [
73
].
4.2.3. Gene Therapy
Gene therapy uses genes for treating or preventing diseases. In the not too distant future, several
diseases will be cured by inserting specific genes into patients’ cells; several approaches have already
been exploited, including replacing mutated genes with healthy genes; inactivating, or knocking out,
mutated genes and introducing into the body a new gene. Gene therapy is a promising treatment
option for a number of diseases (including inherited disorders, some types of cancer, and certain viral
infections); however, it is risky because of its poor safety and e
ffectiveness [
74
].
Mavilio et al., 2006, used epithelial stem cells, known as holoclones, in a patient with junctional
epidermolysis bullosa (JEB). JEB is caused by mutations in genes coding for the basal membrane
component in laminin 5 (LAM5); these gene mutations are devastating and often result in fatal skin
adhesion disorder. Small pieces of epidermis were isolated from patients and treated by a normal
version of LAMβ3 using a retroviral vector. The vector integrated into each cell’s genome, enabling
normal LAMβ3 expression. The in vitro genetically corrected cells formed a larger piece of epidermis
that was transplanted onto the patient’s leg [
75
]. Hirsch and colleagues exploited this strategy
on a seven-year-old child who had an extremely severe form of epidermolysis bullosa caused by
LAMβ3 mutations. Grafts of about 0.85 m
2
were implanted into the patient with full recovery after
21 months [
76
].
Nevertheless, the vector integrates into the host’s genome in random sites and this could
interrupt the expression of essential genes or overexpress genes that control tumor development.
To investigate this possibility, Hirsch and colleagues sequenced the patient’s DNA, revealing that
most of the integrations occurred in non-coding sequences, demonstrating the safety of the treatment.
Moreover, this treatment could be more e
ffective in children, whose stem cells undergo higher renewal.
Technologies such as Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats
/Cas9 (CRISPR’Cas9)
are essential strategies to correct certain mutations. Indeed, stem cell and gene therapies are often
considered to be the future of medicine, but further studies are needed to broaden these types of
strategies in common clinical practice [
76
,
77
].
4.2.4. Induced Pluripotent Stem
Cell reprogramming technology consists of reprogramming adult somatic cells into induced
pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). This technology opened up unprecedented opportunities in the
pharmaceutical industry, clinic and laboratories. iPSCs are also expected to be rising stars in
regenerative medicine as optimal sources for transplant therapy. iPSCs have similar characteristics to
embryonic stem cells (ESCs) in terms of their morphology, self-renewal capacity and di
fferentiation [
78
],
but unlike ESCs, iPSCs are not free from ethical problems. They can also be expanded and used
as autologous cells, avoiding the complication of immune rejection [
14
]; in vitro and in vivo studies
on mouse models have demonstrated the enormous potential o
ffered by these cells in generating a
number of human autologous cells for advanced chronic wound treatment and degenerative skin
disorders. IPSCs can be generated through various methods; Yamanaka and colleagues, in 2006,
proposed a method involving somatic cell transduction with a combination of reprogramming factors
(e.g., Oct3
/4, Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc,). In 2019, Wang and colleagues highlighted NANOG and LIN28
0
s
potency [
78

82
]. iPSCs are able to generate any desired cell type, including fibroblasts, keratinocytes
and melanocytes; however, reprogramming adult somatic cells and inducing subsequent di
fferentiation
in the desired cell line is very di
fficult. In addition, traces of epigenetic memory involve alterations in


Pharmaceutics 2020, 12, 735
14 of 30
genomic stability and di
fferencing capability in iPSC lines [
79
]. These alterations may cause a highly
heterogeneous cell population with undi
fferentiated iPSCs, their self-renewal results in vivo in teratoma
forming. Several e
fforts were made to derive functional stem cells from iPSCs and MSCs and iPSC–MSC
turned out to be an excellent candidate for clinical uses [
80
]. Exosomes derived from human iPSC–MSC
were tested in a rat model and they helped cutaneous wound healing through paracrine signaling,
resulting in accelerated re-epithelialization, reduced scar widths, and the promotion of collagen
maturity [
81
]. Reconstituted hair follicle epithelial components of the interfollicular epidermis were
observed using epithelial stem cells derived from iPSC (iPSC–EpSC) in the skin of immune-deficient
mice [
83
]. These iPSC-based approaches can produce a great number of human autologous cells;
moreover, they could be employed in genome editing techniques. A permanent corrective therapy for
chronic injuries resulting from genetic predisposition can be employed by using correct autologous
iPSCs. Genome-editing tools can be used for repairing di
fferent genetic mutations in iPSCs, such
as zinc nuclease finger (ZFN), transcription activator-like nuclease e
ffector (TALEN), or clustered,
regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats (CRISPR). In any case, even if in vitro and animal
model iPSCs have led to valid results, these cannot be directly translated into clinical approaches since
a greater understanding of these cell types is still needed to protect patient safety.
4.2.5. Skin Tissue Engineering
All these types of approaches adopted by regenerative medicine can be enclosed in the technologies
o
ffered by tissue engineering. The term tissue engineering has numerous definitions, but a broad one
that we prefer is “methods that either promote biologic regeneration or repair of tissues, by providing signaling,
structural, or replace tissue function with systems that contain living tissue or cells”. The main elements of
tissue engineering are biomaterials, cells, growth factors, other signaling molecules, and engineering
components such as sca
ffolds, pumps, tubes, bioreactors, and oxygenators [
84
]. Recent technologies
in the multidisciplinary field of tissue engineering exploit 3D sca
ffolds as a key component in the
wound healing process. According to the definition of tissue engineering described in a National
Science Foundation seminar, sca
ffolds are the best materials to restore, maintain and improve tissue
function [
85
]. These matrices play a unique role in repairing and, especially in tissue regeneration,
providing a suitable platform for various factors associated with cell survival, proliferation and
di
fferentiation [
86
]. Sca
ffolds can be made from natural/synthetic biomaterials, either materials
that remain stable in a biological environment or materials that degrade in the human body [
87
].
Several techniques have been used for their construction, but the four main approaches used include:
(i) sheets of cells secreting ECM; (ii) pre-made porous sca
ffolds of synthetic, natural and biodegradable
biomaterial; (iii) decellularized ECM sca
ffolds and (iv) cells entrapped in hydrogels, as shown in
Figure
4
(schematic representation of classical tissue engineering approach) [
86
]. In the following
paragraphs, di
fferent types of scaffolds used in the field of skin tissue engineering, as well as techniques
for their design and biomaterials, are described in detail. In addition, their advantages
/disadvantages
and, above all, their future prospects in the field of skin tissue regeneration are analyzed.


Pharmaceutics 2020, 12, 735
15 of 30

Baixar 2.23 Mb.

Compartilhe com seus amigos:
1   ...   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   ...   18




©historiapt.info 2023
enviar mensagem

    Página principal