Plato’s Styles and Characters


parts. Other missing topics should guide our reading of the trilogy, and especial-



Baixar 3.45 Mb.
Pdf preview
Página5/25
Encontro11.07.2022
Tamanho3.45 Mb.
#24222
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   25
(Beiträge zur Altertumskunde 341) Gabriele Cornelli - Plato’s Styles and Characters Between Literature and Philosophy-Walter de Gruyter (2016)

parts. Other missing topics should guide our reading of the trilogy, and especial-
ly the degeneration of persons and states in Republic VIII and IX. The Republic
describes how, after many generations, the ideal city could degenerate through
timocracy and oligarchy to democracy and final tyranny. Degeneration is a recur-
rent theme in the Timaeus–Critias: the Timeaus ends with an account of the de-
generation of unjust and cowardly men first into women and then over genera-
tions into various sorts of animals (Ti. 90e1–92c3), and the Critias describes the
effects of erosion on the land around Athens over long periods (Critias 110d5–
d8).
The Critias describes great Atlantis, a city that preserved her self-control for
generations and recognized that honoring wealth would diminish one’s virtue
(Critias 120d6–121a6). But then in the final paragraph of the dialogue, before
it abruptly ends, Critias tells us that the people of Atlantis over-reached, and
as the divine element in them became faint and their human character gained
control, they could no longer bear their good fortune and became bloated
with unjust greed (pleonexias adikou) and power (dunameos) (Critias 121a7–
b7). For this excess Zeus will exact punishment: He convenes an assembly of
gods to declare that punishment (Critias 121b7–c5). The sentence breaks off be-
fore Zeus speaks, but we know from the story of Atlantis in the Timaeus the
form this punishment will take: virtuous Athens will block her aggression
(Ti. 24d6–25c6), and then the island of Atlantis will sink below the sea and dis-
appear, leaving behind a layer of mud near the surface obstructing navigation
(Ti. 25c6–d6). The flood will also destroy Athens, though a few stout souls living
in the mountains will survive and regenerate the city (Ti. 22c1–23d1). As I read
the series, the Hermocrates would have revealed that in the 9000 years since Ath-
ens’ greatness, she has declined into the new Atlantis, the aggressor seeking to
dominate the world.
Plato presents pieces of the final dialogue, as well as the continuation of the
Critias, at the start of the series.²⁰ The Atlantis story in the Timaeus has already
outlined the major contours of the trilogy, and in its talk of recurrent fire and
flood has emphasized the theme of recurrence: For the content of the missing
Hermocrates, simply read ‘Athens’ for ‘Atlantis’ and ‘Syracuse’ for ‘Athens’.
Plato evokes recent history without explicitly telling it, and that should suffice,
 Clay (1997, p. 52) points out that Plato has prepared us for something missing and elliptical
from the start by the absence of the fourth guest from the day before (17a), and by Solon’s failure
to complete his Atlantis (21c–d). In Clay’s view—and I agree—Plato intended the Timaeus–Crit-
ias–Hermocrates to stop in mid-sentence: the series is finished but intentionally incomplete.
Plato’s Unfinished Trilogy: Timaeus–Critias–Hermocrates
41


especially since his fourth-century audience can read a full account of the disas-
trous Sicilian Expedition in Thucydides’ History Book VI. The series Timaeus–
Critias–Hermocrates would have contained a powerful political message about
the corruption of Athens, a message Plato left to his audience to reconstruct. Cit-
ies once great eventually become greedy, fall away from justice, and decline fi-
nally into tyranny. Such degeneration need not happen, of course, but to avoid it
people should cultivate and maintain their rational powers through studying the
orderly cyclical motions of the heavenly bodies discussed in the Timaeus.²¹
How can my reconstruction be right, calling as it does for the Timaeus series
to take place in the late 400s after the invasion of Sicily and before the death of
Hermocrates in 408/7? Some scholars argue that authors of Plato’s time remem-
bered Solon as having lived several generations later than he actually did, thus
allowing Critias the tyrant to be the main speaker.²² I believe that Plato exploited
that misconception and intended his audience to identify Critias as the notorious
contemporary of Socrates. But Debra Nails has convinced me in her detailed
work on Plato’s family tree that Plato probably knew his family history well
enough to recognize that too large a gap separated Critias the tyrant from
Solon for historical accuracy.²³ Indeed, having Critias speak so explicitly of Dro-
pides as his great grandfather seems designed to rule out the infamous Critias as
a speaker in the series.
Yet what perfect camouflage to obscure Plato’s political message should any
authority ask! By including the detail about Dropides, Plato forces his critics to
interpret the Timaeus trilogy as taking place much earlier, before Plato was born,
and with a pleasing message about Athens, still great at that time. But the trilogy
sends the opposite message to Plato’s intended audience. Socrates’ contempo-
rary Critias is the right person to recount the deeds of glorious Athens of the dis-
tant past but with a disturbing undertone. Evidently Socrates and Plato both re-
spected his character and politics until his greed and power corrupted him (Ep.
VII, 324b8–325c5).²⁴ By selecting Critias, Plato reinforces his theme of degener-
ation.
 On education in the Timaeus that could avert such degeneration, see Ti. 88b5–90d7, and
Sattler (forthcoming). The higher education of philosopher-kings in the Republic also bears on
this question. See Burnyeat (2000).
 For a full discussion, see Nesserath (2006, pp. 43–50).
 See Nails (2002, pp. 106–107 and 244: Stemma Plato, reproduced above, p. 39).
 Tuozzo (2011, esp. pp. 52–85), discussing the Charmides, a dialogue featuring Critias, argues
that Plato’s attitude toward Critias is more nuanced than that of many ancient authors who sided
with the restored democracy (such as Xenophon). For instance, Plato may have approved of the
42
Mary Louise Gill


I end with the question about the missing fourth person, whose absence Socra-
tes notes in his opening statement in the Timaeus. The fourth person is ill, says Ti-
maeus; otherwise he would not willingly have missed the meeting. Consistent with
my reading of the series and its temporal trajectory, the fourth person should be
someone competent to judge the political situation of the present day. How much
further has Athens fallen since the invasion of Sicily? Think of Critias and his bloody
junta in 404–403 and the unjust trial and death of Socrates himself in 399 carried
out by the restored democracy. The missing fourth person needs to have outlived the
speakers in the Timaeus–Critias to tell of Athens’ further corruption involving them.
If I am right about the content of the Hermocrates and the theme of recurrence, that
fourth speaker could also have told the tale of Syracuse after its own shining mo-
ment stopping Athenian aggression. In Plato’s lifetime that great city degenerated
into tyranny under the rule of Dionysius II, events detailed in the Seventh Letter,
written either by Plato or by someone intimately acquainted with Plato’s hopes
and disappointment in Sicily when he tried and failed to transform Dionysius II
into a philosopher-king. Like Atlantis and Athens, Syracuse too awaits the punish-
ment of Zeus.
Plato need not spell out the particular differences between Atlantis, Athens, and
Syracuse, glorious cities in their prime and their eventual corruption.²⁵ Plato can
again rely on his fourth century audience to have read Thucydides’ History. In stat-
ing his methods and aims, Thucydides admits that details of his account may be in-
exact, because he often had to rely on conflicting second-hand reports. The specific
details do not matter; he wishes to convey a universal message: given human na-
ture, the events he describes will occur again (History of the Peloponnesian War
I.22). I suggest that the missing fourth person is Plato himself, who witnessed the
continued decline of Athens and knows first-hand the degeneration of Syracuse.²⁶
project of the oligarchy while disapproving their methods. Tuozzo argues that Critias was a con-
servative, deeply attached to aristocratic ideals, and an admirer of all things Spartan.
 Cf. Johansen (2004, p. 11), who thinks that Hermocrates is present in the Timaeus–Critias to
remind us of the ‘general phenomenon of unjust aggression against justified self-defence’.
 I am by no means the first person to suggest Plato as the missing fourth person: Proclus (=
Diehl [1903] 1965, pp. 20, 9–21) attributes the view to Dercyllides and dismisses it; Taylor (1928,
p. 25) says the view has sometimes been revived in modern times but finds the idea so ridiculous
that he does not cite the relevant sources, saying only that the idea is based on nothing more
than Plato’s absence from the death-scene in the Phaedo because of ill-health. Cf. Archer-
Hind (1888, p. 55), who also cites no sources. Cornford (1935, pp. 3–4) thinks there is no ground
for any conjecture as to the identity of the fourth person, and that the most sensible remark is
that of Atticus, preserved by Proclus (= Diehl [1903] 1965, pp. 20, 21–27), that the fourth person
would have been another visitor from Italy or Sicily, since Socrates asks for news of him—that is,
he asks why the fourth person is absent today.
Plato’s Unfinished Trilogy: Timaeus–Critias–Hermocrates
43


He gives us a nice clue: on one other occasion Plato missed an important date—Soc-
rates’ final day depicted in the Phaedo—and for the same reason: he was ill
(Phd. 59b10).
Works Cited
Archer-Hind, R. D. 1888, The Timaeus of Plato, with Introduction and Notes, MacMillan,
London. Reprinted by Arno Press, 1973.
Broadie, S. 2012, Nature and Divinity in Plato’s Timaeus, Cambridge University Press,
Cambridge.
Burnet, J. 1900–1907, Platonis Opera, 5 vols., Clarendon Press, Oxford.
Burnyeat, M. F. 2000, ‘Why Mathematics is Good for the Soul’, in T. Smiley (ed.),
Mathematics and Necessity, The British Academy, London, pp. 1–81.
Campbell, L. 1867, The Sophistes and Politicus of Plato, a Revised Text and English
Notes, Clarendon Press, Oxford.
Clay, D. 1997, ‘The Plan of Plato’s Critias’, in T. Calvo & L. Brisson (eds.), Interpreting the
Timaeus–Critias, Academia, Sankt Augustin, pp. 49–54.
Cornford, F. M. 1935, Plato’s Theory of Knowledge: the Theaetetus and the Sophist of Plato
translated with running commentary, Routledge & Kegan Paul, London.
Davidson, D. 1993, ‘Plato’s Philosopher’, in T. H. Irwin & M. C. Nussbaum (eds.), Virtue, Love
& Form [Essays in Memory of Gregory Vlastos], Academic Printing & Publishing,
Edmonton, pp. 179–194.
Diehl, E. [1903] 1965, Procli Diadochi: in Platonis Timaeus Commentaria, Hakkert,
Amsterdam.
Diels, H. & Kranz, W. 1951–1952, Die Fragmente der Vorsokratiker, 3 vols., 6
th
edn.,
Weidmann, Berlin. (Original work by Diels published 1903.)
Dorter, K. 1994, Form and Good in Plato’s Eleatic Dialogues: The Parmenides, Theaetetus,
Sophist, and Statesman, University of California Press, Berkeley.
Duke, E. A. et al. 1995, Platonis Opera, vol. 1, Clarendon Press, Oxford.
Frede, M. 1996, ‘The Literary Form of the Sophist’, in C. Gill & M. M. McCabe (eds.), Form
and Argument in Late Plato, Clarendon Press, Oxford, pp. 135–151.
Friedländer, P. 1969, Plato, 3 vols., Princeton University Press, Princeton.
Gill, C. 1977, ‘The Genre of the Atlantis Story’, Classical Philology, vol. 72, no. 4,
pp. 287–304.
Gill, M. L. 2012, Philosophos: Plato’s Missing Dialogue, Oxford University Press, Oxford.
Guthrie, W. K. C. 1978, A History of Greek Philosophy (6 vols.), vol. 5: The Later Plato and the
Academy, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.
Hicks, R. D. 1925, Diogenes Laertius: Lives of Eminent Philosophers, 2 vols., Loeb Classical
Library, Harvard University Press, Cambridge.
Hude, K. 1993, Herodotus Historiae, 2 vols., 3
rd
revised edn., Clarendon Press, Oxford.
Johansen, T. K. 2004, Plato’s Natural Philosophy: A Study of the Timaeus–Critias, Cambridge
University Press, Cambridge.
Jones, H. S. & Powell, J. E. 1942, Thucydides, Historiae, 2 vols., Clarendon Press, Oxford.
44
Mary Louise Gill


Klein, J. 1977, Plato’s Trilogy: Theaetetus, the Sophist, and the Statesman, University of
Chicago Press, Chicago.
Miller, M. 2004, The Philosopher in Plato’s Statesman, repr. with suppl. material, Parmenides
Publishing, Las Vegas. (Originally published 1980.)
Nails, D. 2002, The People of Plato: A Prosopography of Plato and other Socratics, Hackett,
Indianapolis.
Nesselrath, H.-G. 2006, Platon: Kritias, Platon Werke VIII, 4, translation and commentary,
Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, Göttingen.
Notomi, N. 1999, The Unity of Plato’s ‘Sophist’: Between the Sophist and the Philosopher,
Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.
Panagiotou, S. 1973, ‘The Parmenides is the Philosopher: A Reply’, Classica et Mediaevalia
30: 187–210.
Sattler, B. 2007, review of Nesselrath, Platon: Kritias, Bryn Mawr Classical Review,
2007.01.43.
Sattler, B. forthcoming, ‘Planetary Motions—a Guide through Human History? Plato’s
Astronomy and Philosophy of History in the Timaeus’.
Skemp, J. B. 1952, Plato: The Statesman, Routledge & Kegan Paul, London.
Tarrant, H. 1993, Thrasyllan Platonism, Cornell University Press, Ithaca.
Taylor, A. E. 1926, Plato: The Man and his Work. Methuen, London.
Taylor, A. E. 1928, A Commentary of Plato’s Timaeus, Clarendon Press, Oxford.
Tuozzo, T. 2011, Plato’s Charmides: Positive Elenchus in a “Socratic” Dialogue, Cambridge
University Press, New York.
Vidal-Naquet, P. 2007, The Atlantis Story: A Short History of Plato’s Myth, trans. by J. Lloyd,
University of Exeter Press, Exeter. (Originally published in French, Belles Lettres, Paris,
2005.)
Wilamowitz-Moellendorff, U. von 1959, Platon: sein Leben und seine Werke, Weidemann,
Berlin.
Wyller, E. A. 1972, ‘The Parmenides is the Philosopher’, Classica et Mediaevalia, vol. 29,
pp. 27–39.
Zeyl, D. 2000, Plato: Timaeus, Hackett, Indianapolis.
Plato’s Unfinished Trilogy: Timaeus–Critias–Hermocrates
45



María Angélica Fierro
The Myth of the Winged Chariot in the
Phaedrus: A Vehicle for Philosophical
Thinking
One should achieve one of these things: learn the truth about these things or find it for one-
self, or, if that is impossible, adopt the best and most irrefutable of men′s theories, and,
borne upon this, sail through the dangers of life as upon a raft (schedía), unless someone
should make the journey safer and less risky upon a firmer vessel (óchīma) of some divine
doctrine.
Phd. 85d (Grube′s translation)
Plato’s abundant use of myth and his general reflections on poetry suggest that,
though to be condemned when uncritically used,¹ story-telling is valued and
well-considered if it is put at the service of philosophical teaching. In general
terms it can be said that in Plato’s philosophy the myth either suggests through
images something not susceptible at present to a complete conceptual explana-
tion or expresses what is not in itself expressible by means of a philosophical
argument on its own,² as is the case with the eschatological myths of the Phaedo,
Gorgias and Republic 10 and the creational myth of the Timaeus.³ Here I will ex-
amine the different functions that the myth of the winged chariot simultaneously
 In Republic II myths are condemned when they misrepresent the real nature of the gods.
Superficial rationalistic interpretations of myths are also rejected for example at Phdr. 229c ff.
through Socrates’ critical reflections on sophistic exegesis of the story of Boreas and Orithuia. As
he says at Phdr. 275b-c, in the end what really matters in relation to any story is whether the tale
expresses something true or not. On this point see also Halliwell (1993, p. 27, n. 32) and Szlezák
(1993, pp. 96–97).
 Thus mýthos represents what lógos fails to explain. Halliwell (1993, p.17) follows this kind of
interpretation regarding the final myth of Republic. Vasallo 2011 offers a detailed examination of
the structure of the palinode. Werner 2012: chap. 3 gives an analogous approach of the palinode
to what I develop in the last two sections. In his excellent work Vallejo Campos 1995 prefers to
focuse on other myths.
 In consequence a mýthos as a whole can potentially be rendered as lógos. See esp. Gorg. 523a.
However, because of its power of communicating the truth in an intuitive form, mýthos preserves
its own characteristics and advantages over lógos (see Szlezák 1993, p. 98). Some scholars have
even suggested that through myths, such as the one of Republic 10, Plato means to present al-
ternative/opposite views to the ones developed through the philosophical arguments so that the
reader has to arrive at his own conclusion regarding these debatable matters (see McCabe 1992).


fulfills in the Phaedrus. I will show that this winged chariot has the purpose of
being an efficient “vehicle” of philosophical thinking.⁴
In Socrates’s second speech itself there are some clues about the grounds for
the development of the myth of the winged chariot. First of all, before the myth-
ical account of what the soul’s idéa and páthī are, it is stated that this explana-
tion will be human and shorter, instead of divine and longer, as well as rendered
through a comparison of what the soul is like:
[Regarding the soul] to say what kind of thing it is would require a long exposition, and one
calling for utterly superhuman powers; to say what resembles requires a shorter one, and
one within human capacities (anthrōpínes kaì eláttonos). Phdr. 246a
Afterwards, there is a more specific warning that here the god is depicted as a
living organism with soul and body due to the limitations of human understand-
ing on this topic and its incapacity for formulating a rational argument about it:
…immortal it is not, on the basis of any argument which has been reasoned through (ex
henòs lógou lelogisménou), but because we have not seen or adequately conceived of a
god we imagine a kind of immortal living creature which has both a soul and a body, com-
bined for all time. But let this, and our account of it, be as is pleasing to the god. Phdr. 246c⁵
Finally, at the end of Socrates’s discourse he states that his poetic fashion of
speaking about érōs was designed to suit Phaedrus’s frame of mind.
This, dear god of love, is offered and paid to you as the finest and best palinode of which I
am capable, especially given that it was forced to use somewhat poetical language because
of Phaedrus (toîs onómasin īnagkasménī poiītikoîs tisin dià Faîdron). Phdr. 257a
If we take into account these three indications, independently of the particular
contexts in which they are pronounced, the following reasons for Plato’s use
of this myth as a resort in the Phaedrus can be devised:
1) An account of what something is like, instead of what something really is,
allows making a shorter presentation of contents which would require a lon-
ger development.
2) It also allows the expression in human terms about something which it is
not possible to speak in divine terms, that is to say, through a clear grasp
of the subject and on basis of an argument or lógos.
 Translations from Phaedrus are taken from Rowe 1988; text (with references) from Burnet
1900 –1907.
 On this point see also Ti. 28c, 29cd, 30d.
48
María Angélica Fierro


3) In addition, it stimulates a sympathetic attitude for its contents in people
who are more inclined to poetic ways of expression than to a purely dialec-
tical argument.
Corresponding with these hints, which are given in the text itself, I intend to
show here that the myth of the winged chariot simultaneously meets more spe-
cifically the following purposes:
a) Along the lines of 1) above, it brings together different views on the human
condition which are to be found in other Platonic dialogues: the Symposi-
um’s theory of érōs; the Republic’s tripartite model of the soul; the Phaedo’s
psychī–sōma dualistic conception. In this sense it summarizes something
which would require a longer dissertation.
b) Along the lines of 2) above, it describes not only our present, incarnated ex-
istence but lets us speculate about a possible existence without a mortal
body and envisage it as part of a continuous process of life and death per-
taining to the whole universe within the perspective of eternity. Thus it
gives an account about something which human reason is not able to
fully understand.
c) Along the lines of 3) above, it provides an attractive account of these topics,
as well as of other issues, which makes it understandable by an interlocutor
who has a Phaedrus-like psychological type.
In addition to this, I mean to give evidence that this myth not only fulfills these
three functions but also articulates these different issues appropriately. At first
sight it seems that the myth tackles quite dissimilar topics: the three anthropo-
logical conceptions mentioned above at a); the Meno’s and Phaedo’s theory of
anámnīsis; the Stateman’s dialectical method of division and collection; surrep-
titious hints to the Timaeus’ cosmological theory; an account of the Ideas anal-
ogous to the description of them in the middle dialogues; a detailed phenomen-
ology of the state of being in love. Besides, the mythical account is inserted in
the wider context of Socrates’s palinode to Eros, which is loosely organized ac-
cording to a classification of the forms of manía and also includes a dialectical
“proof” of the immortality of the self-moving soul (Phdr. 245b–246a). Such a jum-
ble of issues would contradict the ideal of producing discourses with their sec-
tions assembled in a way similar to the parts of a living organism (Phdr. 264c).
Thus, the myth would deserve the same reproach for lack of structure and dis-
proportion as could be adjudicated to the dialogue as a whole.⁶ I intend to
 The dialogue has two parts with quite different topics and styles (a first part which consists of
The Myth of the Winged Chariot in the Phaedrus
49


show that, at least regarding the topics concerning to a) –c) mentioned above,
the literary strategy of the myth of the winged chariot actually allows the integra-
tion of different elements in an organized whole. In this way it works as an effi-
cient óchīma for the understanding of philosophical matters.
Articulation of three anthropological models
through the mythical account
In Socrates’ second speech, right after the division of manía into four classes and
the demonstration of the immortal nature of the self-moving soul, the human,
shorter account (anthrōpínes kaì eláttonos) of the “form”—idea—of the soul
and what it is like—hoíon ésti—is rendered through the simile—hōî éoiken—of
the winged chariot which is described in the following terms:
Let it then resemble the combined power (dýnamis) of a winged team of horses and their
charioteer. Now in the case of gods, horses and charioteers are all both good and of
good stock; whereas in the case of the rest there is a mixture. In the first place our driver
has charge of a pair; secondly one of them he finds noble and good, and of similar stock,
while the other is of opposite stock, and opposite in its nature; so that the driving in our
case is necessarily difficult and troublesome. Phdr. 246a–b
In this section I aim to show that this image does not juxtapose⁷ but concisely
articulates three conceptions of the human condition which are developed at
length in dialogues focused on other topics and placed in other dramatic con-
texts.
Firstly, as usually pointed out, the symbolism of the two horses and the char-
ioteer can be easily traced back to the tripartite theory of the soul designed in
Republic 4 and particularly taken up again in Books 8 and 9. The black horse
would represent the appetitive part of the soul or the epithymītikón, which
thoughtlessly goes for its objects, independently of their goodness or badness,
and diverts reason from its aiming at truth and the real good (see R. 4.439b, d
and 4.442a). The white horse would symbolize the spirited part or the thy-
moeidés, from which aggressiveness emerges and which loves victory and hon-
three speeches on Eros and a second part which develops a dialectical discussion on rhetoric
and the art of producing discourses) and extension (the first part is quite longer and, besides,
Socrates’s speech much longer than any other part). For this reason it can be described as a
sort of bicephalus monster whose heads have quite different sizes (see Rowe 1986, p. 106).
 For this view, see Ostenfeld 1982, pp. 228–234.
50
María Angélica Fierro


our (see R. 4.439e, 2.375a–b, 9.581b). Finally, the charioteer would personify rea-
son or the logistikón which, as lover of learning and wisdom (see Rep. 582d,
581b), ideally should lead the entire soul towards what really is.
Secondly, in the same passage mentioned above, another element is includ-
ed: the “wings” of the soul which represent the rising dýnamis of Eros.
The natural property (dýnamis) of a wing is to carry what is heavy upwards, lifting it aloft to
the region where the race of the gods resides. Phdr. 246d
Both horses possess wings, in a Pegasus-like way, whose dýnamis -the power of
desire- pulls the soul, under the guidance of the charioteer, towards the plain of
the truth where beauty shines out.⁸ The picture of Eros uplifting the soul towards
beauty itself clearly evokes the conception of érōs in the Symposium which drives
the soul through the different steps of the scala amoris (210a–212a).
Thirdly, the human soul whose wings are not strong enough to take it in the
journey with the gods towards the eidetic realm must adopt an incarnated exis-
tence in a mortal sōma:
(…) but before it was possible to see beauty blazing out, when with a happy company they
saw a blessed sight before them –ourselves following with Zeus, others with different gods–
and were initiated into what it is right to call most blessed of mysteries, which we celebrat-
ed, whole in ourselves, and untouched by the evils which awaited us in a later time, with
our gaze turned in our final initiation towards whole, simple, unchanging and blissful rev-
elations, in a pure light, pure ourselves and not entombed in this thing which we now carry
around with us called body, imprisoned like oysters (asīmantoi toútou ho nŷn dī sōma peri-
férontes onomázomen, ostréou trópon dedesmeuménoi). Phdr. 250b–c
Thus, the soul, which is imprisoned in a mortal body as in a tomb, loses its pu-
rity and splendor and forgets about the divine things, that is to say, about its
travel together with the divine caravan towards the Ideas. This depiction imme-
diately brings to mind the couple psychī–sōma which is the characteristic de-
scription of the human condition in the Phaedo.⁹
I intend to show here that the myth of the winged chariot does not just jum-
ble these three anthropological conceptions but rather provides a dynamic artic-
 However, Plato may also have in mind a winged charioteer as some representations of the
time suggest This is the case of the theme “Eos on a chariot” who is “shown both with and with-
out wings” and “sometimes the horses have wings” (see Matheson 1995, p. 209, actually Plato is
probably conceiving the whole soul as capable of acquiring wings, that is to say as by Eros cf.
Phdr. 251d.
 In the Phaedo the body is characterized as an “obstacle” (empódion) to noetic activity
(Phd. 65a, 66b-d) and as a “prison” (eirgmós) (Phd. 82e). See also Cra. 400c and Grg. 493a.
The Myth of the Winged Chariot in the Phaedrus
51


ulation of them. Firstly, it should be noted that érōs in the Phaedrus is able to
adopt in the case of human beings two opposite directions. On one hand, érōs
can be “upwards” and elevate the soul towards the eternal reality – the Ideas.
On the other hand, there is a “downwards” érōs, not explicitly mentioned in
the palonide, which is the soul’s desire for what is mortal and corruptible. The
wings of the soul which raise the chariot symbolize Eros the god, that is to
say, érōs in its most perfect expression. This kind of érōs participates in the di-
vine (Phdr. 246d) and nourishes with the truth (Phdr. 248b–c), that is to say,
with the contact with the eidetic realm (Phdr. 247d). Notwithstanding, many
souls do not achieve the “beatific visions”, have their wings trampled, lame
and ruined (Phdr. 248b) or even lose them so that they fall down on earth and
takes hold of a mortal sōma (Phdr. 248c). Thus, in the case of non-divine
souls, their upwards érōs which aims at the truth is resisted and even cancelled
by a downwards érōs which aims towards mortal and bodily objects of desire.
These two possible directions of érōs are clearly mentioned at Phdr. 246b–c:
Now when it is perfectly winged, it travels above the earth and governs the whole cosmos;
but the one that has lost its wings is swept along until it lays hold something solid, where it
settles down, taking on an earthly body, which seems to move itself because of the power of
the soul…
In the Symposium Socrates-Diotima’s speech also depicts érōs as able to flow into
different directions. Here érōs is a daímōn-metaxý, that is to say, an “intermedi-
ary” between the mortal realm and immortal realm (see Fierro 2007). Its utmost
expression is being a philósophos, especially in the description of the ascent to-
wards beauty itself in the Higher Mysteries (Smp. 210a–212a). However, érōs usu-
ally runs into other directions and, thus, originates other forms of existence, in-
sofar as some people love (erân) wisdom but others love business, physical
training or honours (Smp. 205a–206a). In other words, although everybody
shares érōs’ lacking-resourceful condition and is a lover of the good, some are
able to procreate katà to sōma, others procreate katà tīn psychīn and only a
few climb the scala amoris towards beauty itself and procreate true virtue. In ad-
dition to this, some conclusions on the different, even opposite, directions of
érōs can also be inferred from some details of the dramatic context. Insofar as
the fictional date of the Symposium’s opening narration should be placed around
403 BC, this means that Alcibiades had already met his tragic end. On the other
hand, at Agathon’s party, whose fictional date should be placed around 416 BC,
Alcibidades makes clear his refusal to be driven by Socrates towards a philo-
sophical way of life and his preference for the flatteries from the many (Smp.
216a-b). He constitutes, then, an example of how érōs can steer the existence
52
María Angélica Fierro


of a person not only in a different track from philosophy but even into an oppo-
site and destructive route (see Fierro 2010).
Secondly, the image of the winged chariot, which is led by the charioteer to-
wards the eidetic realm, pulled into that direction by the white horse but unbal-
anced by the black horse stands for how opposite forces of desire create an in-
trinsic lack of equilibrium within non-divine souls. This picture displays, indeed,
how the direction and strength of the drive which comes from each of the two
horses and represent different kinds of desires or parts of the soul help to fortify
or weaken the two fundamental directions of érōs mentioned above. It shows,
then, how the Symposium’s theory of érōs and the Republic’s tripartite theory
of the soul can be articulated (see Fierro 2008; Sassi 2007). Let us examine
this point with more detail.
According to the hydraulic image of the soul at R. 485d-e there are two dif-
ferent streams of desire within the soul which clearly correspond to two of its
Baixar 3.45 Mb.

Compartilhe com seus amigos:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   25




©historiapt.info 2022
enviar mensagem

    Página principal