Plato’s Styles and Characters


party, 416, and Socrates’s claim that Diotima put off the Athenian plague for a



Baixar 3.45 Mb.
Pdf preview
Página21/25
Encontro11.07.2022
Tamanho3.45 Mb.
#24222
1   ...   17   18   19   20   21   22   23   24   25
(Beiträge zur Altertumskunde 341) Gabriele Cornelli - Plato’s Styles and Characters Between Literature and Philosophy-Walter de Gruyter (2016)

party, 416, and Socrates’s claim that Diotima put off the Athenian plague for a
decade, push his acquaintance with her back before 440 – when Socrates was
an unattached young man in his thirties. That he might have learned ta erôtika
from her, as he claims in the Symposium (201d), is no more refuted than con-
firmed by any available evidence. What is vexing is the insistence with which
Diotima is so often assumed to be a pure fiction, Plato’s creation. If the historical
 Nehamas and Woodruff, trr. 1989: xii, citing Symposium 204d–e, 212c.
 Ledger 1989: 103–4, 117, 124–25 (Lysias’s speech in the Phaedrus, sometimes still listed
among Lysias’s sextant speeches), and 166 (Zeno’s scroll from the Parmenides).
 After all, Aristophanes had been persistently critical of Socrates (423, ±418, 414, and 405),
earning a mention in Socrates’s speech before his jury. The present treatment of Diotima is a
truncated version of a full article devoted to evidence for her existence and contribution
(Nails 2015).
308
Debra Nails


Socrates ever really mentioned learning from men and women, priests and
priestesses, as Plato has him say more than once (cf. Meno 81a5–b1), or put
names to any of them, would it be so very surprising that his young associates
took note of it?
Whatever is going on with Diotima, we should not be reduced to assuming
that she must be either non-existent or, qua stand-in for Plato, the fount of phil-
osophical wisdom. She is represented as a mystagogue of the Eleusinian myster-
ies, and that gives us some idea of her role in society. Elsewhere in Plato, she
would be ranked fifth among nine character types from philosopher to tyrant,
right behind doctors. ³⁴ We need to be paying more attention to what Diotima
says, but not as Plato’s mouthpiece.
The central roles of two foreign-born women – Diotima and Aspasia – both
of whom Socrates said were his teachers – provide support for the argument that
Plato viewed the intellects of women, when freed from the subjection of Atheni-
an education and custom, as equal to those of men. Plato’s Symposium and his
Theaetetus introduce an epistemology that is more stable and more complex
than the one attributed to Plato in the popular imagination: namely, the
Meno-Phaedo doctrine that forms are recollected from our having apprehended
them before we were born. Diotima, on the contrary, denies human immortality
(212d5–7) and offers an epistemology that sounds much like physiology: human
beings are capable of knowledge, just as they are capable of walking and talking.
Men and women are pregnant in both body and soul, she says. Under the right
stimulation, exercise for the body and elenchus for the psyche, limbs grow
strong, vocabulary is acquired, and ideas develop. Human bodies, like those
of other animals developing from infancy to old age, constantly replace their
“hair or flesh or bones or blood” (207d); likewise, bits of knowledge are forgot-
ten and must be studied anew in the course of a lifetime (208a). All desire, in-
cluding intellectual curiosity, falls under her broad definition of ‘erotic desire’
(205b).
IV. Phaenarete
Phaenarete, wife of Sophroniscus and Chaeredemus. In the Theaetetus, Plato
uses a woman, Socrates’s midwife mother, Phaenarete, as a model in the process
of intellectual development. As in the Symposium, one needs a guide to bring
 Phaedrus 248d3–4; cf. Republic 9.
Five Platonic Characters
309


one’s ideas to birth, and Socrates describes himself as practicing his mother’s
art. ³⁵
I want to emphasize here a contribution that our background information
about Phaenarete makes to our views of Plato’s social and political philosophy.
Cynthia Patterson (1998: 103–105, 133–137) takes a special interest in the inno-
vations offered in Plato’s Laws that address existing Athenian problems with in-
heritance of property, marriage, and adultery. As she details, the laws of inher-
itance proposed in the Platonic Laws are a significant improvement for women
over the actual laws of Athens. Plato’s revisions may owe something to the expe-
rience of the widows we find in the dialogues: Xanthippe, Aspasia, and Phaenar-
ete. The experience of his own twice-widowed mother, Perictione, may also have
had an effect, for she faced even fewer choices at the death of Plato’s father, Ar-
iston, than did Phaenarete when Sophroniscus died.
Phaenarete was married first to him, then to Chaeredemus, making Patrocles
– whom Socrates mentions in the Euthydemus (297e) – his half brother. The ca-
reer of Patrocles shows up in the records altogether later, indicating a rather
wide gap, about twenty years, between the two sons of Phaenarete. That gap
makes it unlikely that Sophroniscus left a will, bequeathing Phaenarete to some-
one else, as was his right. Our best evidence is that Socrates had already come of
age when his father died. If so, Phaenarete was in a position unique within the
Athenian legal code, allowed to choose whether to return to her father’s house-
hold (or that of his heirs), or to remain in the house of Sophroniscus under the
tutelage of her son Socrates. If Socrates had been a minor when his father died,
Phaenarete would have been under the tutelage of Sophroniscus’s nearest male
relative, under well-defined regulations about degrees of kinship (Patterson
1998: 70 –106). He would have had the power to give her in marriage, to
marry her himself if eligible (i.e., if he was unmarried, or if he was married
but childless and preferred to divorce his existing wife). Whatever Phaenarete
chose, her dowry went with her to provide for her maintenance. ³⁶
 Theaetetus 149a. Plato’s Socrates demonstrates some familiarity with the range of the mid-
wife’s knowledge, including the use of drugs (pharmakeia) and incantations for easing and caus-
ing pain, inducing birth, aborting the fetus, and cutting the umbilical cord. It should be noted
that, in a society where infanticide was permissible for five days after birth, prohibitions on
abortion would have made little sense. Until an infant was publicly acknowledged by its father
in the amphidromia ritual that admitted the infant to the household (oikos), it had no status
under law. Cf. Garland 1990: 93–4.
 See Harrison 1998: 1.38; MacDowell 1978: 88–9.
310
Debra Nails


V. Unnamed of Athens
The unnamed Athenian first wife of Pericles then married Hipponicus.
It has long been the practice of translators and commentators to provide a
sentence or thumbnail sketch of Plato’s characters. Christopher Taylor’s transla-
tion of Protagoras provides seven excellent sketches of famous characters from
the dialogue, but there are no sketches of the other thirteen named characters.
Another problem with the hallowed thumbnail sketch is that it does not show
a character’s relations to other people – but unrealistically presents persons
as tiny “atomic careers.” The Protagoras features three foreign sophists plus Pro-
tagoras’s best student. ³⁷ The conclave of sophists is so promising that three vis-
itors have come into the Athenian urban area, the astu, from outlying demes
across the Hymettos mountains. ³⁸
I want to concentrate on the other Athenians, those who live in or close to
the walled center of the city. Host Callias is famous for paying a great deal of
money to sophists; his house is in the Alopece deme, just southeast of the
wall; so he and Socrates, as well as at least Hermogenes, and Callias’s father,
Hipponicus II, ³⁹ are fellow demesmen, giving them special obligations to one
another. ⁴⁰ The others live within a three-mile radius. But there are closer and
more interesting connections than precinct and proximity. It is not just failure
to take seriously Plato’s depiction of social life and relationships that has
been at work in our not being able to fill in the missing social and political
pieces of Socrates’s life and those of his close associates. A longstanding obsta-
cle has been that women have been ciphers to scholars, often not appearing on
stemmata at all, though connections can be difficult to recognize or downright
misleading without them. The stemma at figure 4, though very heavily abridged,
illustrates some relations that are not normally noticed.
 Protagoras of Abdera, Hippias of Elis, and Prodicus of Ceos; Protagoras’s student is Anti-
moerus of Mende.
 Philippides I is from Paeania, Phaedrus is from Myrrhinous, and Andron is from Gargettos.
We do not yet know the demes for Agathon, though the presence of women in his house in Pla-
to’s Symposium makes an urban deme likely, or for Adeimantus, son of Cepis (a hanger-on of
Alcibiades, making Scambonidae better than a mere guess).
 It is interesting to note that Hipponicus II (d. ≤422) appears to have passed householder re-
sponsibilities on to his adult son, very like Cephalus with respect to Polemarchus in Republic 1.
 On the demesman relation, see, for example, Plato Laches 180b–d (cf. 187d–e), Apology 33e,
Phaedo 115c3; Aristophanes Clouds 1206–1210, 1322, Ecclesiazusae 1023–1024, 1114–1115, Achar-
nians 333, Knights 319–320, Plutus 253–254; and Lysias 16.14, 27.12.
Five Platonic Characters
311


The heavy arrow points to “unnamed” of Athens who was the wife of Peri-
cles, then of Hipponicus II, though we do not know her name. She ties together
the entire extended family. Without Plato’s comment at Protagoras 315a1 that she
is homomêtrios, we could not know that Callias’s two maternal half-brothers are
the sons of Pericles, both present in the dialogue. Callias’s paternal half-brother
is Socrates’s frequent companion, Hermogenes, also present. Alcibiades – also
present – is still Pericles’s ward at the time of the dialogue, but he will later
marry Callias’s sister, Hipparete. Plato’s own family is implicated too because
Callias marries the daughter of Glaucon, Plato’s great-granduncle.
By adding this unnamed woman to the picture, we can see that this is no
arbitrary collection of visitors to the house of Callias, listening to sophists;
this is the extended family of Pericles himself, visible as soon as the characters’
familial relations are plotted on the page. The dialogue is set at the beginning of
the Peloponnesian War, not long before Pericles’s death and that of his sister
and two eldest sons; and it makes the discussions in Plato’s Protagoras of de-
mocracy, relativism, and education all the more pointed. For a modern parallel,
think of the difference between a story of a conversation among high school stu-
dents about prospective universities, and the story that the Kennedy clan once
met in Hyannis Port to decide which university they would all attend and sup-
port.
* * *
We should not, of course, conclude too much from the historical facts Plato
chose to allude to in his dialogues, but those facts show at least what he noticed
and mentioned; and – together with his proposals for changes in inheritance
laws – suggest that he noticed the conditions of women in Athens that made
it so very unlikely that their intellects could be developed appropriately in the
absence of training and education equal to men’s. To return to my initial
claim, it behooves us to pay attention to the people of Plato’s dialogues as par-
ticular individuals, and in far greater depth than I can manage here. The fact that
Plato’s dialogues present us with specific individuals in conversation is some-
thing that we should take seriously. Platonic specificity is the unalterable
basic condition of not only the dialogues but Plato’s conduct of philosophy.
We cannot reach the universal except by way of particulars; there is no unmedi-
ated apprehension of Platonic forms. So, although arguments can be addressed
independently of the text, those arguments are not the dialogues – stripped of
their context, they are not only no longer what Plato wrote, but no longer repre-
sentative of how he does philosophy. I am not merely making the semantic point
that ‘dialogues’ are, almost by definition, words plus context. Rather, I am saying
312
Debra Nails


Fig. 4: Plato, Protagoras, abridged stemmata
Five Platonic Characters
313


that Plato’s dialogues are irreducibly an interplay between particular and univer-
sal that we fail to confront to our peril.
Modern Works Cited
Anderhub, Jakob Heinrich 1941. Joco-Seria aus den Papieren eines Reisenden Kaufmanns.
Wiesbaden: Kalle.
Artmann, Benno 1994. “A Proof for Theodorus’ Theorem by Drawing Diagrams,” Journal of
Geometry 49.
Ausland, Hayden W. 2000. “Who Speaks for Whom in the Timaeus-Critias?” In Gerald A.
Press, ed., Who Speaks for Plato?, 183–198. Lanham: Rowman and Littlefield, 2000.
Bindel, Ernst 1962. Pythagoras. Stuttgart: Freies Geistesleben.
Benson, Hugh H. 2012. “The Problem is not Mathematics, but Mathematicians: Plato and the
Mathematicians Again,” Philosophia Mathematica 20: 170–99.
Blondell, Ruby 2002. The Play of Character in Plato’s Dialogues. Cambridge: Cambridge
University Press.
— 2006. “Where is Socrates on the ‘Ladder of Love’?” In Lesher et al., 147–178.
Bluestone, Natalie Harris 1987. Women and the Ideal Society: Plato’s Republic and Modern
Myths of Gender. Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press.
Brown, James Robert 1999. Philosophy of Mathematics: An Introduction to the World of Proofs
and Pictures. New York: Routledge.
— 2004. “Peeking into Plato’s Heaven,” Philosophy of Science 71, 1126–1138.
Brown, Malcolm 1971. “Plato Disapproves of the Slave-boy’s Answer,” in Plato’s Meno ed.
Malcom Brown. Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill, 198–242. Reprinted from The Review of
Metaphysics 20 (1967), 57–93.
Burnyeat, Myles 2000. “Plato on Why Mathematics is Good for the Soul,” Proceedings of the
British Academy 103, 1–81.
Caveing, Maurice 1996. “The Debate between H. G. Zeuthen and H. Vogt (1909–1915) on the
Historical Source of the Knowledge of Irrational Quantities,” Centaurus 38, 277–92.
Dover, Kenneth J[ames] 1989 <1978>. Greek Homosexuality. Cambridge: Harvard University
Press.
— 1966. “Aristophanes’ Speech in Plato’s Symposium.” Journal of Hellenic Studies 86,
41–50.
Fowler, David 1999. The Mathematics of Plato’s Academy, 2
nd
edn., Oxford: Oxford University
Press.
Garland, Robert 1990. The Greek Way of Life. Ithaca: Cornell University Press.
Giaquinto, Marcus 2007. Visual Thinking in Mathematics: An Epistemological Study, Oxford:
Oxford University Press.
Gödel, Kurt 1964. “What is Cantor’s Continuum Problem?” in P. Benacerraf and H. Putnam,
eds., Philosophy of Mathematics: Selected Readings, Cambridge: Cambridge University
Press.
Gouvêa, Fernando Q. 1999. [review of Fowler 1999], Mathematical Association of America
,
accessed 11 January 2011.
314
Debra Nails


Halperin, David 1990. “Why is Diotima a Woman? Platonic Erôs and the Figuration of
Gender.” In Before Sexuality: The Construction of Erotic Experience in the Ancient Greek
World, ed. David Halperin, John J. Winkler, and Froma I. Zeitlin, 257–308. Princeton:
Princeton University Press.
Harrison, A. R. W. 1998 . 2
nd
edn. with foreword by D. M. MacDowell. The Law
of Athens. Vol. I: The Family and Property. Vol. II: Procedure. Indianapolis: Hackett
Publishing.
Heath, Thomas Little 1921. A History of Greek Mathematics. Oxford: Clarendon.
Knorr, Wilbur 1975. The Evolution of the Euclidean Elements: A Study of the Theory of
Incommensurable Magnitudes and Its Significance for Early Greek Geometry. Dordrecht:
Reidel.
Ledger, Gerard R. 1989. Re-counting Plato: A Computer Analysis of Plato’s Style. Oxford:
Clarendon.
Leibniz, G. W. 1991 [1686]. Discourse on Metaphysics, tr. Daniel Garber and Roger Ariew,
Indianapolis: Hackett Publishing.
MacDowell, Douglas M. 1978. The Law in Classical Athens. Ithaca: Cornell University Press.
Morrow, Glenn R. 1970. “Plato and the Mathematicians: An Interpretation of Socrates’ Dream
in the Theaetetus 201e–206c,” The Philosophical Review 79: 3, 309–33.
Nails, Debra 1995. Agora, Academy, and the Conduct of Philosophy. Dordrecht: Kluwer.
— 2002. The People of Plato: A Prosopography of Plato and Other Socratics. Indianapolis:
Hackett Publishing.
— 2015. “Bad Luck to Take a Woman Aboard.” In Second Sailing: Alternative Perspectives
on Plato, ed. Debra Nails and Harold Tarrant. Helsinki: Scientiarum Fennica.
Patterson, Cynthia B. 1998. The Family in Greek History. Cambridge and London: Harvard
University Press.
Taylor, C. C. W., tr. 1976. Protagoras. Oxford: Clarendon.
Thesleff, Holger 1990. “Theaitetos and Theodoros,” Arctos 24, 147–59.
Tuana, Nancy, editor. 1994. Feminist Interpretations of Plato. University Park: Pennsylvania
State University Press.
Vlastos, Gregory 1991. Socrates, Ironist and Moral Philosopher. Cambridge: Cambridge
University Press.
Five Platonic Characters
315



Francisco Bravo
Who Is Plato’s Callicles and What Does He
Teach?
Callicles is undoubtedly the Platonic character that has achieved the greatest au-
tonomy from its author and has most influenced certain contemporary schools of
thought.¹ It is indeed significant that his influence is felt even in our times.² As
Dodds wrote in 1959³, it is a strange irony of History that the presentation made
by Plato of ideas he wanted to destroy, has actually contributed to their formida-
ble renaissance in our days. It is therefore of great interest to reexamine this
character’s identity and the positions he defended. Who is he? What does he
teach?⁴ What does Plato attempt when he presents him? Being known only
from Gorgias it is not plausible to answer to the question “who is he” before de-
termining at least the gist of what he teaches.
I. Callicles and the Thesis of the Strongest’s
Rights
Callicles’ “doctrines” range from a philosophy of philosophy to an extreme eth-
ical hedonism, but the center of all these is his theory on justice. Interpreters
agree that this is not a pure invention of Plato’s, but a reflection of the doctrines
bubbling at the time. But the author does not merely record them: the arguments
advanced by his characters, Callicles in particular, are, as noted by G. B. Ker-
ferd,⁵ “composed and manipulated” by him, and we could add that “he is the
producer, the production manager and the author of the script.”
 The nexuses between Callicles and Nietzsche has been particularly analyzed. A. Fouillée
(1902: 96, 187) has done so in passing, others with more thoroughness. See specially W. Nestle
(1912: 554) and Adolfo Menzel (1964).
 cf. Menzel (1964: 23).
 E.R. Dodds (1959: 390).
 The “Thrasymachus” of the Republic has provoked in me the same line of questioning: “Who
is and what does Thrasymachus, from the Republic, teach?”, in Estudios de Filosofía Griega, Ca-
racas, CEP/FHE, 2001, pp. 237–262.
 Kerferd, (1981: 119).


The fundamental thesis defended by our character about the fair life is that
the stronger should prevail over the weaker and have more than the latter.⁶ Xerx-
es’ actions, in recent Greek history, showed this. He invaded Greece with no other
basis than his power, and the same point is shown regarding Darius’ actions. Da-
rius, Xerxes’ father, subdued the weak Scythians based on the same principle of
power. According to Callicles, both have acted “in accordance with the nature of
what is fair (katà physin tên toû dikaíou),”⁷ which, as such, is “a law of nature
(nómon tês phýseôs),”⁸ even though it opposes the city’s laws. Callicles, thus, dis-
tinguishes natural law from State laws and argues that only the first one can be
identified with the nature of what is fair, while the others are “rules contrary to
nature (nómous toùs parà phýsin hápantas),”⁹ and so being each one “most often
contradict the other (enantí’allêlois estín).”¹⁰
We must, however, recall that it was not yet clear what a state law consisted
of back then. “One gives the name of law – responds Pericles to Alcibiades’ ques-
tion – to any decision of the People’s Assembly, made existent in writing, where
it is determined what to do or not do.”¹¹ Similar is the answer of Socrates to Hip-
pias: “state laws are contracts or covenants made by the citizens, by which it is
established and promulgated what should be done and what should be avoid-
ed.”¹² In both descriptions, state laws are conventions established by the citizens
“on what should be valid among them.”¹³ They are therefore subjective and vary
from polis to polis.¹⁴ But Callicles clarifies that they are not approved by the
whole of the city, only by the crowd, since the wise men stick to what is in ac-
cordance with nature and the truth.¹⁵ He, thus, fully embraces the antithesis be-
tween nómos and phýsis, probably introduced by Archelaus¹⁶ and widely dis-
cussed in the 5th and 4th centuries.¹⁷ Moreover, certain scholars¹⁸ believe that
 Gorgias 483 d 1–3 and 6.
 Gorg. 483 e 4.
 Gorg. 483 e 5.
 Gorg. 484 a 6.
 Gorg. 482 e 7–8.
 Xenophon, Mem. I, 2, 40.
 Xenophon, Mem. IV, 4.
 Menzel (1964: 28).
 This view is shared both by Callicles and Protagoras. Cf. Teet., 177 d 1–4 and 172a-c.
 Cf. Menzel (1964: 26). According to this author, Callicles approximates phýsis to reason, and
thus equates natural law and rational law. Nevertheless, this idea would only achieve full devel-
opment with the stoics. Through Cicero philosophy of law was finally imposed on Middle Ages
and Modern times.
 Diog. L., II, 16.
 Cf. Bravo (2001: 15–42).
318
Francisco Bravo


Callicles provides an original concept of this antithesis, and seem to place on his
side Aristotle, linking him to our character,¹⁹ noting that, “for these philoso-
phers, that which is according to nature is the truth (tò alêthés) and what is
under the law is the opinion of the crowd (tò toîs polloîs dokoûn)”.²⁰ There are
those, however, who believe that Callicles did nothing but “to reproduce the fun-
damental ideas of Hippias”.²¹ Against them, others feel that Hippias’ Ius naturale
is essentially different from the Calliclean Ius naturale. Let’s recall the words Pro-
tagoras²² puts in the mouth of the sophist from Elide: “Everyone here, he says, I
consider as friends, as neighbors, as fellow citizens as according to nature (phýs-
ei), but not to the law (ou nómoi). According to nature, indeed, the similar is a
relative of the similar, but law, tyrant of men (týrannos tôn anthrôpôn), does vio-
lence to nature”.²³ As seen, Hippias, like Callicles, also criticizes positive law in
natural law’s name. But he does not deny its validity as the latter. He rather ad-
vocates for “a senior law, an unwritten one”,²⁴ which he explicitly names in his
dialogue with Xenophon’s Socrates²⁵ and which he attributes to the gods.²⁶ His
iusnaturalism thus adopts a cosmopolitan, democratic and humanitarian direc-
tion. It is compatible to the written law, although above the latter. Callicles ar-
gues, in contrast, that all positive laws are “contrary to nature (parà phýsin há-
pantas²⁷)”, and an invention of the weak to tame the stronger exponents of the
law of nature (katà nómon ge tês phýseôs²⁸). The weak, in effect, using the educa-
tional process, seize the strong ones from an early age, as if those were little
lions (hôsper léontas) to be tamed, and model them using incantations, making
them believe that “they must be each like the other (tò íson chrê échein)” and
that “there we have the beautiful and the fair”,²⁹ a tenor of Athenian democracy.
This is actually the target of Callicles’ attacks, while for Protagoras, one of its
oldest defenders, positive law is “the only justifiable form of government”.³⁰ Ac-
 Menzel (1964: 25).
 Aristotle, Soph. Elench. 173 to 2 ss.
 Soph. Elench. 173 to 16.
 Cf. F. Dümmler, Academica, Huyesen, 1889, cit. by Menzel (1964) 30.
 Cf. Prot. 337c-338b.
 Prot. 337c7-d2.
 Menzel (1964: 30).
 Mem. IV, 4: “Do you know what does the expression ‘unwritten laws’ mean?” – “Yes, the
ones that are uniformly observed in the whole country”.
 Mem. IV, 4: “I believe the gods made these laws for men”.
 Gorg. 484 a 5.
 Gorg. 483 e 5.
 Gorg. 484 a 1–3.
 Cf. Menzel (1964: 10).
Who Is Plato’s Callicles and What Does He Teach?
319


cording to the “Myth of Protagoras”, cities themselves became possible thanks to
Hermes, the messenger of Zeus, who brought men “decency and justice (aidô te
kaì díkên³¹)” and distributed these, not to only one or a few persons, as the art of
music, but “to all” evenly (epì pántas³²) as a first condition for life in society,
which is the only true form of human life.³³ The conclusion of this Protagorean
statement for democracy could not be sharper: “someone unable to participate
in these gifts will be sentenced to death as a plague to the city” (322d4–5). Ac-
cording to the sophist from Abdera, Athenians firmly believe that “all men par-
take of justice”.³⁴ For Herodotus, closely associated with him, “democracy is the
world of equality (isonomía)”.³⁵ Thucydides, undoubtedly influenced by Protago-
ras³⁶, Democritus³⁷ and even Euripides,³⁸ put in the mouth of Pericles the funda-
mental principle of the democratic State: “It serves – he says – the interests of
the mass of citizens and not just a minority”.³⁹ He then presents, as its funda-
mental elements, equality, freedom and the rule of law. Equality is held the
most important element, and Pericles proclaimes that “all are equal before the
law”.⁴⁰ That is the principle Callicles tried to destroy.
Suppose, says he, that among the domesticated by democracy there emerges
“a man sufficiently well endowed by nature as to shake ( … ) and throw away
from him all the strings”: “I’m sure – he maintains -, that, throwing to his feet
our writings, spells and incantations”, he, who was before our slave (δοῦλος)
 Prot. 322 c 2.
 Prot. 322 d 1.
 The “Myth of Protagoras” leads us to the idea that “natural state represents a life without
any rights, without morality and without State”, which goes contrary to Callicles’ ideas. Prota-
goras’ conclusion is that what is just “does not exist by nature, since it only happens through
the laws approved by the people”. Cf. Menzel (1964: 17–18).
 Prot. 323c1. This is what one understands from the translation by A. Croiset, Col. Budé, 1967.
 Cited by Menzel (1964: 10).
 Cf. Menzel (1964: 12, 14).
 Democritus also defends the democratic juridical thinking and the idea of the egalitarian
State. He believes that democracy presupposes harmony (ὁμόνοια) among citizens. Cf. DK B 251.
 The Suppliants and Phoenician Women by Euripides show lovely praise to democracy. In the
first one, Theseus agrees to rescue the corpses of the dead heroes, after a plead from his mother,
but he wishes this would be “approved by the whole of the people (….)”. “Because – he says – I
made it a sovereign State, where all are free and have the same rights” (349–352). Addressing
the herald from Thebes, he advises him that “our city is not in the hands of a sole man. It is
its people who govern it. Money gives no advantages. The poor and the rich have equal rights”
(404–408). Menzel (1964: 14) believes that these two tragedies may be considered as “literary
models” of Pericles’ Discourse.
 Thucyd. II, 1, 37; cf. Menzel (1964: 12).
 Thucyd. II, 1, 37.
320
Francisco Bravo


would revolt and would then stand as our master (despótês hêméteros). And then
“the just by nature would shine in all its glory (to tês phýseôs dikaion)”41.⁴¹ Thus,
instead of the principle of egalitarian democracy, Callicles presents the need of a
superman, who would be the condition for natural justice to happen.⁴²
II. Callicles’ Allies
In support of its anti-egalitarian natural law (iusnaturalism), Callicles invokes an
ode by Pindar expressing – he says – “the same thought I had when it claims
that law, queen of all things (nómos pantôn basileýs) / justifies the driving
force of all things / with its sovereign hand.” And Pindar illustrates that idea
with one of Heracles’ feats, he who was the Greek model of the superman.⁴³
He, without paying for it or receiving it as a gift, seized a herd of oxen that be-
longed to Geryon,⁴⁴ claiming that under “natural justice, oxen and all the goods
of the weaker and less brave man are property of the better and stronger one”.⁴⁵
Thus, Pindar would have admitted the presence of natural law on Heracles’ feat
and was, thus, one of the first Greeks to defend it.⁴⁶ Callicles, meanwhile, uses
this same Pindaric myth to apply, for the first time, for the advent of a superman
 Gorg. 484 b 1.
 Zarathustra’s fundamental message is no different: “Ich lehre euch den Übermenschen. Der
Mensch ist etwas, das überwunden werden soll”. (F. Nietzsche, Also sprach Zarathustra, Prologue,
3).
 Plato’s Symposium (177b3) reminds us that Heracles was praised by some “sophists of
value”. He was obviously thinking about Prodicus’ Heracles, mentioned by Xenophon Mem. II
21–34. Euripides considers him “the greatest of all heroes” (Heracles’ madness 150).
 Three-headed and three-bodied (up to his hips) giant, who lived on the island of Erytheia, at
the outskirts of the Occident. His wealth consisted of herds of oxen kept by Eurytion and his dog
Orthrus. Cf. P. Grimal (1994: 213).
 Gorg. 484c2.
 Plato seems to accept this understanding of the verses written by the author of Epinikia. Nev-
ertheless, it seems unilateral and incomplete, since – according to Menzel (1964: 51) – it “omits
the religious moment from the solution”. Thus, “Heracles’ victory over the giant Geryon is not
due only to a stronger force, there is also a whole exteriorizing of divine will”. Actually, Greek
mythology is not clear on the reasons of Heracles’ acts. It looks like the hero did not act so
on his own will nor because he considered himself the strongest, but after Eurystheus’ demand,
who sent him “in order to bring back the precious oxen” of Geryon’s (P.Grimal (1994: 246; cf. 213).
Moreover, it seems that it was Eurystheus himself who gave Heracles these orders, either be-
cause he was so told by the gods, or because of the love shared between them, as a token of
that love (a recognized Alexandrian tradition presents Heracles as Eurystheus’ lover: cf. P. Gri-
mal (1994: 187).
Who Is Plato’s Callicles and What Does He Teach?
321


as the only way to restore the law of nature.⁴⁷ Curiously enough, Plato and Aris-
totle do not seem unaffiliated to this figure. It would, indeed, be legitimate to
perceive some similarity between Callicles’ superman and the ruler-philosopher
of the Platonic state.⁴⁸ The Stageirite, on the other hand, does not rule out the
hypothesis of an individual or group of individuals who, by their transcendent
virtue become like a god among men (hôsper gàr theón en anthrôpois).⁴⁹ For
these “supermen”⁵⁰- he holds – there is no law, but they themselves being the
law,⁵¹ and it would be ridiculous to legislate for them, since they would reply
with the words Antisthenes puts in the mouth of the lions when hares demand
equality for all.⁵²
Let’s go back to Plato. In addition to his thesis of the philosopher-king, who
could evoke the superman of Callicles, there are, in the dialogues, other charac-
ters that seem to travel the same path as our character. And above all Thrasyma-
chus,⁵³ whose main thesis is that what is fair is nothing but what is useful to the
strongest (toû kreítonos xymphéron⁵⁴). However and contrary to Callicles, he con-
cludes that the only right is the positive one,⁵⁵ determined in each case by the
usefulness to the strongest.⁵⁶ At first glance, there appears an opposition to
our character, because it excludes what is fair by nature. On the other hand,
he coincides with Callicles by stating that positive law does not protect all citi-
zens, but only the strongest.⁵⁷ Another character that comes close is Glaucon,
chosen to expose the doctrine of some sophists, especially Thrasymachus.⁵⁸
Why did Plato give this task to his brother? Perhaps – says Menzel – “for the
same reason he created the figure of Callicles, whose thoughts Glaucon is inti-
 The idea of a superman or a superior man (ho béltistos) appears more than once on the Pla-
tonic dialogues. Cf., for example, Rep. IX, 590 d 1–2, where he is compared to the slave (doúlos),
even though the advantages of him being “ruled by a divine and wise being (hypò theíou kaì
phromímou árchesthai: 590 d 5.)” is stated, in opposition to Thrasymachus. Although Plato
also believes that the best should line up the worst (cf. 590c-592a).
 Cf. Rep. V 473 d; Letter VII, 326 b 1–4.
 Aristotle. Pol. 1284 a 11.
 J. Tricot (Aristote, La Politique, Paris, J. Vrin, p. 231) uses “surhommes” in his translation of
1284 to 10.
 Pol., III, 13, 1284 a 11.
 Pol. 1284 a 17: “Where are your claws and teeth?”. Cf. Aesop, Fable 241.
 Cf. Rep. I 336 b ss, IX 590 d, Laws IV 714c.
 Rep. 338 c 3.
 Menzel (1964: 64).
 Cf. Rep. 338 d-e.
 Cf. Menzel (1964: 64).
 Cf. Rep. 358 b-c. Glaucon wants to know “justice’s and injustice’s nature and the effects both
produce within the soul they reside in” (358b4–5).
322
Francisco Bravo


mately related to”.⁵⁹ Given the disadvantages carried by both the perpetration
and the suffering of injustice, he argues that the best thing to do was to establish
mutual agreements to avoid each of these (xýnthésthai allêlois mêt’ adikeîn mêt’
adikeîsthai⁶⁰). Of these agreements were “born the laws and conventions of men
among themselves” so that they are “the origin and essence of justice” (359a5),
midpoint (metaxý) between the greatest goodness – injustice with impunity –
and the greatest evil – “the inability to avenge” it (359a6–7). As seen, Glaucon
does not merely comment on Thrasymachus: for the latter, law is an imposition
made by the strongest, while for the former it is the result of a contract. This the-
sis makes him, as Menzel notes, “the forerunner of the idea of the social contract
(contractus socialis)”.⁶¹ However, he coincides with Callicles in considering that
positive juridical order favors only the very weak and not the few “real men”
(alêthôs ándra⁶²), which are the supermen. At the beginning of the story of the
ring of Gyges, the statements are unequivocally Calliclean: the fair follows the
same path as the unfair because, like him, he is driven by the incessant desire
for more (dià tên pleonexían), that all nature pursues as a good (ho pâsa phýsis
diôkein péphyken ôs agathón) and law diverts, by force, towards the respect for
equality”.⁶³
III. Who Is the Strongest?
Callicles’ belief is that Socrates would accept his thesis if he himself would re-
sign his own conception of philosophy and accepted Socrates’.⁶⁴ It is not my in-
tent to take up the latter, akin to that of Isocrates’ in several points⁶⁵, nor to dis-
sect the Socratic refutation of his central thesis.⁶⁶ I will stick only to what
Socrates puts at the center of the debate, namely, the concept of the ’strongest’
(tò kreîtton). What Plato’s spokesman tries to show is that the many weak can be
stronger than the few strong. But what does Callicles mean by ‘tò kreîtton’ (the
strongest)? Does it mean the same as ’tò béltion’ (the best)? (488b9) Is it possible
that the best partner with the weakest? (488c7). Callicles’ negative response
 Menzel (1964: 67).
 Rep. 359 a 2.
 Menzel (1964: 68).
 Rep. 359 b 3.
 Rep. 359 c 5–7.
 Gorg. 484 c-d.
 Cf. W. Jaeger, Paideia (1971: 662, 836).
 Cf. Gorg. 487 a ss.
Who Is Plato’s Callicles and What Does He Teach?
323


makes his opponent object that, regarding the reality of facts, the crowd (hoi pól-
loi) is naturally stronger and better than the individual (toû henós). It is, in fact,
the crowd “that imposes its laws” (488d6–7), which are, therefore, “laws of the
mighty” (488d7). Now, the crowd holds, contrary to Callicles, that “justice is
equality” (díkaion eînai tò íson échein) rather than inequality and therefore “per-
petrating injustice is uglier than suffering injustice” (489a3–4). Our anti-egali-
tarian natural law legislator cannot but admit that, yes, “this is what the
crowd thinks” (489a8). This concession allows his opponent to conclude that
the principle according to which perpetrating injustice is uglier than suffering
it complies not only with the law (positive: nómoi), but also with nature (phýsei),
and that therefore it is false that law and nature are contrary to each other
(489b2–3). Given the risk of an unwanted recantation, Callicles claims that
what he said is that ‘better’ and ‘stronger’ are (…) synonyms (489c2–3), but
not at the level of worthless people, but that of the strong ones. This irritated
loophole allows Socrates to conclude that, for his opponent, despite what he
said, ‘better’ is not synonymous with ‘stronger’ (489d4). What do you mean,
then, by the ‘best’? (ti pote legéis toùs beltíous;)? “Who are the best”? (489e3).
By any chance are they “the wisest” (toùs phronimôtérous) (489e8)?
Callicles welcomes this suggestion with some enthusiasm and fits it with his
thesis of the right of the strongest: “the fair, according to nature – says he now –
is the best, that is, the most reasonable, the one who rules over the mediocre and
have more than they do” (490a7–8). And then he reiterates that “the best is the
wisest” (tò phronimôteron beltío: 490d2). What would be the order of things (perì
tinôn: 491a4)?, asks his opponent. Not crafts wise, but in regard to political af-
fairs. The best are, then, those engaged in them and who are wise and coura-
geous in their management (491c6–7). But it remains to be determined if the
best also govern themselves (autòn heautoû árchonta: 491d6), that is, as Socrates
understands this, if “they dominate within themselves pleasures and impulses”
(ton hêdonôn kaì epithymían: 491e1). This definition of self-government, far from
pleasing our character, unleashes the harshest hedonism: to accept it, says he,
would be to call wise the morons (toû helithíous) and to forget that our explan-
andum is “the beautiful and the fair according to nature” (tò katà phýsin kalòn
kaì díkaion: 491e7). According to our nature, “to live well, one has to feed life
with the strongest passions, instead of suppressing them” (491e9). Since such
is not at their fingertips, the crowd claims that “intemperance is shameful” (ais-
chrón) (492a5). Against such “human conventions against nature” (tà parà phýsin
synthêmata anthrôpôn) and “worthy of nothing” (oudenòs áxia) (492c7–8) stands
Socrates’ opponent, who, however, praises his courage and frankness, and ac-
knowledges that he has “clearly expressed what others think but do not dare
say” (492d2–3). Then the problems on “how to live” (pôs biotéon: 492d5) and
324
Francisco Bravo


“who is happy and who is not” (hóstis te eudaímôn estín kaì hostis mê: 472c10),
already debated with Polus, resurface. It is impossible to analyze the disjointed
Platonic refutation of Callicles’ sybarite hedonism.⁶⁷ There it is evident the exis-
tent gap between what is natural according to each of the interlocutors: Socrates
sets it within the rational part of man, while Callicles sets it within the irrational.
IV. Who Is Callicles?
But who is this “somewhat mysterious figure” that has not left “trace in recorded
history”⁶⁸ except from Gorgias? No doubt his identification can help us under-
stand the Platonic way of philosophizing. We must, however, admit that there
is not yet a satisfactory answer to the question here presented.⁶⁹ Nevertheless,
it would be risky to argue that Plato “felt a secret sympathy for Callicles” and
that this is, at heart, nothing more than “a portrait of Plato’s self that Plato re-
jects”.⁷⁰ Levinson rightly observes that “it is not correct to identify Plato with
characters he himself abhors”.⁷¹ Apart from this hypothesis, which lies within
subconscious psychology, there are three historical others: (1) Callicles is a his-
torical character according to both his name and personality, (2) Callicles is Pla-
to’s invention from one extreme to the other, (3) His name was Plato’s invention,
but not the character itself, which is historically real. The first hypothesis, which
was proposed by Wilamowitz,⁷² seems untenable, since there is no reference to
our character outside Gorgias. It is true that Aristotle mentions him as a defender
of the antithesis nómos-phýsis⁷³ and Aulus Gellius⁷⁴ counts him among the ene-
mies of philosophy, but both refer to the dramatic Platonic dialogue and not to a
historical character. One could argue that Plato refers to several facts that seem
to imply his existence: to his homeland (Acharneus⁷⁵), to three of his friends (An-
 Cf. F. Bravo (2007: 102–107).
 W. K. C. Guthrie (1971: 102).
 Cf. Menzel (1964: 113).
 Guthrie (1971: 106). According to G. Rensi, cited by Levinson (1953: 471), “the Socrates-Calli-
cles conflict in Gorgias is not a conflict between two individuals, but one that happens within
just one mind set”. E. R. Dodds (1959: 13 ss.) seems to accept this point of view when he says
that “since Plato felt some sympathy for men of the Calliclean signature”, his portrait of Callicles
“has not only warmth and vitality but breathes out some affection plain of sorrow”.
 Levinson (1953: 472).
 Wilamowitz-Möllendorf, Platon (1919: I, 208).
 Cf. Ref. Sof., 173 a 9.
 A. Gellius, Attic Nights, book X, chap. 22.
 Gorg. 495 d 5.
Who Is Plato’s Callicles and What Does He Teach?
325


drotion, Lysander and Nausicydes⁷⁶), who really existed, and to Demos, son of
Pyrilampes, who would have been Callicles’ lover.⁷⁷ Nevertheless, let’s recall,
along with Menzel, that Plato is both a philosopher and a poet, and, thanks to
his dual nature, he was able to combine facts and fiction.⁷⁸ We must also rule
out the hypothesis that Callicles is an outright invention of Plato’s, as his doc-
trines transcend Gorgias and have been shared by other well-known writers: Pin-
dar, already mentioned, Euripides, who develops the same doctrines as Callicles
in Phoenician Women,⁷⁹ and especially Thucydides, as we shall see. There is still
the third hypothesis, which is subject to novel discussion.
Who is behind the invented name of Callicles? Some historians, like Theodor
Berg,⁸⁰ identify him with Charicles, one of the Thirty Tyrants. But Th. Gomperz
timely notices that apart from this purely external onomastic similarity, Plato at-
tributes to his character personality traits that conflict with Charicles’ own.⁸¹
Let’s recall, with Menzel, that no one has mentioned the literary activities of
this tyrant, while Socrates presents Callicles as one of the most learned men
of his times.⁸² Let’s once again recall the spontaneity with which he turns to Pin-
dar in order to support his natural law (“iusnaturalism”), and also to Euripides,
so that he could illustrate the distinction between the two kinds of living.⁸³ One
could argue that Charicles also defended the thesis of the right of the strongest,
since that is what he exercised as a member of a tyrannical government. But he
did act more on a political level than in a doctrinal one. For similar reasons, Otto
Apelt’s suggestion, that Callicles is none other than Alcibiades, has been reject-
ed.⁸⁴ Alcibiades certainly had a dominant nature⁸⁵ and was, moreover, as our
 Cf. Gorg. 487c.
 Gorg. 481d-e.
 Menzel (1964: 114).
 Actually, Phoenician Women presents the confrontation of the two points of view: Jocasta’s
egalitarian “iusnaturalism”, defended against her sons Eteocles and Polynices – “nature – says
she – gave men the law of the equal rights” (tò gàr íson nómimon anthrôpois: 558) -, and the anti-
egalitarian “iusnaturalism” of her sons (according to whom “one that attacks has the lawful
right to oneself”: 258; “mortals speak of equal rights, being those nothing than vain words, to
be denied by the acts” (499–502); “if there is an error that can be justified it is the one commit-
ted because of royalty, admirable iniquity” (káliston adikeîn: 524–525).
 Th. Berg (1872–1877, vol. IV, p. 447).
 Th. Gomperz (1901: I, 577; cf. A. Menzel’s (1964: 114) similar observation. Regarding the per-
sonality traits, see in particular Gorgias 487c.
 Menzel (1964: 115); cf. Gorg. 487b.
 Cf. Gorg. 485e-486a.
 Cf. Menzel (1964: 115).
 During the Peloponnesian War he was a marked defender of the Sicilian Expedition; not-
withstanding, his urge for power led him to ally with the Lacedaemonians and the Persians.
326
Francisco Bravo


character, Socrates’⁸⁶ friend, but, despite his reputation as an orator, it is not
known either he ever exhibited literary tastes. Moreover, Alcibiades was present
at Callicles’ speech,⁸⁷ and this rules out the possibility eo ipso to identify the for-
mer with the latter. Add, following Menzel, that Callicles “was a strong supporter
of the oligarchical thought and felt a profound contempt for the mass of the
weak”, while Alcibiades sought support for his plans within people’s favor.⁸⁸
Charicles and Alcibiades being weeded out, several historians identify Cal-
licles with Critias, who, according to Guthrie, “seems to fit exactly the role of Cal-
licles”.⁸⁹ Especially, Menzel believes that he is “the embodiment of Plato’s uncle”
and that “the theory of the superman is, in a great extent, taken from his writ-
ings”.⁹⁰ Before him, only Christian Cron⁹¹ had looked upon such a hypothesis,
but with arguments that seemed unconvincing to Menzel. What are those?
This interpreter distinguishes between arguments and “evidence”. The first indi-
cation that Callicles is Critias would be that the former appears as a host of Gor-
gias,⁹² Critias teacher: such a presentation would be a way to insinuate his men-
tal presence in the debate. The fact that Callicles is presented as a friend of
Socrates’⁹³ would point to the same direction: Critias also was, even though
bad friend and bad disciple, actually, because he joined the teacher and then de-
Baixar 3.45 Mb.

Compartilhe com seus amigos:
1   ...   17   18   19   20   21   22   23   24   25




©historiapt.info 2022
enviar mensagem

    Página principal