Plato’s Styles and Characters


parted from a previously sketched out plan, he then proceeded to turn into a dia-



Baixar 3.45 Mb.
Pdf preview
Página10/25
Encontro11.07.2022
Tamanho3.45 Mb.
#24222
1   ...   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   ...   25
(Beiträge zur Altertumskunde 341) Gabriele Cornelli - Plato’s Styles and Characters Between Literature and Philosophy-Walter de Gruyter (2016)

parted from a previously sketched out plan, he then proceeded to turn into a dia-
logue. For structure is the key to understanding the Sophist. It allows the reader
to grasp its program and understand where it is heading.
Opposed to a structural composition, the transcription of an oral conversa-
tion writes itself. Take for instance the elenctic dialogues: the Lysis or the Char-
mides. They may be seen as the record of actual debates. There seems not to be a
particular reason for any option in the exchange between Socrates and Critias on
 In the Phaedo or the Republic Epistemology and Ontology are tied together, for each one of
the two cognitive competences “is related to” its own content – “being” or “opinion” – and “ef-
fects” its product: “knowledge” or “belief” (R. V 477d ff.).
“Reading Plato’s Sophist”
97


the nature of sôphrosynê; nor for the short conversation with Lysis precisely in
the place we read it. As no definite answer is found, these dialogues might linger
on forever.
The problem with structure is that any views on it hardly are consensual. For
any approach to structure depends on intertextual connections relying on pre-
suppositions that divide the interpreters. This might, however, be what was in
Plato’s mind when he chose to write dialogues.
It is difficult to imagine the program of the Sophist in the form of a confer-
ence but the Timaeus shows this is not impossible. The philosopher Plato might
go on hidden from his audience. But would the readers miss any relevant hint? I
think they would. With Theaetetus gone, the constant counterpoint of his pres-
ence, the assurance, hesitation or evasiveness in his answers would be lost.
The point of his presence is the actual learning, for the Meno has made it
clear that something is taught only when someone is there to understand it
(“learning” and “knowing”: manthanein).
Works Cited
Ackrill, J. (1957/1965), “Plato and the Copula: Sophist 251–259”, 1957 (rep. in Studies in
Plato’s Metaphysics, R. E. Allen (ed.), 1965, 207–218).
Aristotle. On the Soul, Parva naturalia, On Breath, Translation by W. S. Hett. Harvard,
Cambridge. 1975.
Brown, L. (2012), “Negation and not-being: Dark Matter in the Sophist”, Presocratics and
Plato: A Festschrift in honour of Charles Kahn, R. Patterson, V. Karasmanis, A. Hermann
(eds.), Parmenides Publishing, Las Vegas 2012, 233–254.
Brown, L. (2008), “The Sophist on Statements, Predication and Falsehood”, The Oxford
Handbook of Plato, G. Fine (ed.), Oxford, 437–462.
Brown, L. (1999), “Being in the Sophist: A Syntactical Enquiry”, Plato I, Gail Fine (ed.),
Oxford, 455–478.
Curd, P. (1991), “Parmenidean Monism”, Phronesis XXXVI/3, 241–264.
Denyer, N. C. (1991), Language, Thought and Falsehood in Ancient Greek Philosophy, London
1991.
Gill, C. (1996), “Afterword: Dialectic and the Dialogue Form in Late Plato”, Form and
Argument in Late Plato, Chr. Gill, M. M. McCabe (eds.), Oxford Clarendon P., Oxford,
283–311.
Kahn, C. (1973), The Verb ‘Be’ and its synonyms, The Verb ‘Be’ in Ancient Greek,
Philosophical and grammatical studies edited by W. M. Verhaar, Dordrecht/Boston 1973.
Kahn, C. (2003), “Introduction”, “The Greek Verb ‘Be’…”, 2003
2
.
Kyoung-Lee, M. (2008), “The Theaetetus”, The Oxford Handbook of Plato, G. Fine (ed.),
Oxford, 412–436.
Owen, G. (1970/1999), “Plato on not-being” Plato I, G. Vlastos (ed.), Garden City 1970,
223–265 (repr. in Plato I, Gail Fine (ed.), Oxford, 1999, 416–454).
98
José Trindade Santos


Plato. Translated by W. R. M. Lamb, H. N. Fowler, P. Shorey, R. G. Bury. Harvard,
Cambridge. 1914–1935.
Vlastos, G. (1994), Socratic Studies, M. Burnyeat (ed.), Cambridge U. P., Cambridge.
“Reading Plato’s Sophist”
99



Other Genres and Traditions



Michael Erler
Detailed Completeness and Pleasure of the
Narrative. Some Remarks on the Narrative
Tradition and Plato
¹
Introduction
In the ‘Preface’ of his novel Der Zauberberg Thomas Mann claims that pleasure
results from the completeness of a narrative.² In doing so he reacts to a differen-
tiation between history and philosophy, which is propagated by Schopenhauer.³
But he also follows a tradition which goes back to antiquity, that is to Homer⁴,
and also to the Platonic dialogues, as I shall argue. In the following I shall
dwell on Plato as narrator.⁵ Plato, of course, never narrates a dialogue in his
own person. Even in his dialogues with a framing narrative he always ascribes
the role of primary narrator either to Socrates or to someone else.⁶ On the
other hand it is characteristic of the Platonic Sokratikoi logoi – some even call
this characteristic an invention by Plato⁷ – that Plato shows strong concern
with character types, as well as with historical and detailed historical settings
of the conversations he describes. Already in antiquity Plato was admired for
his ability to describe situations in a realistic manner, conveying to the reader
the feeling of being in a theatre.⁸ Often Plato reminds the reader of the sources
of the stories and describes the character of narrators in detail.⁹ By doing so, he
emphasizes the truth of the setting in a way that reminds one of the strategies
employed by historians to prove the authenticity of a real conversation – recall
 A slightly modified version of this contribution in German will appear in S. Föllinger, Müller
(Hgg.), “Der Dialog in der Antike. Formen und Funktionen einer literarischen Gattung zwischen
Philosophie, Wissensvermittlung und dramatischer Inszenierung” 2013, 349–364.
 Th. Mann, Gesammelte Werke in dreizehn Bänden, Frankfurt a.M. 1974, III, 10; see Reents
1998, p. 66.
 See Reents 1998, p. 66.
 See Kannicht 1988, p. 10 –15.
 Halperin 1992, p. 94; Morgan 2004; Hunter 2006; Halliwell 2009.
 See Erler 2007, p. 73 sqq.:
 Cf. Clay 2000, p. 10; Blondell 2002, p. 31sqq.; Rossetti & Stavru 2010, p. 11 sqq.
 About the mimetic character of Plato’s dialogues cf. Halliwell 1997, pp. 313–332; Halliwell
2002, p. 37–71; Büttner 2000. Plato’s critique of poetry and his own dialogues as poetry are dis-
cussed in Erler 2013.
 See Blondell 2002, p. 31 sqq.


the prooemia of the Symposium, the Parmenides or the beginning of the Ti-
maeus.¹⁰ Plato plays the game so well that his dialogues sometimes were read
as historical documents.¹¹ Plato the narrator, it seems, aims at completeness
of his narrative in order to entertain the reader. One wonders how this fits into
what Plato, the philosopher, has to say about his search for a unity which lies
behind the plurality of the phenomena and overcomes the plurality of the sen-
sible world. One could try to explain it as a strategy. The ‘historical’ setting
and personae of the dialogue function as a sort of evidence and as support
for what is being argued for.¹² I wish to focus on Plato’s way to narrate his stories
in the dialogues, because the rhetoric of completeness Plato illustrates and prac-
tices, very much resembles what we find as early as in Homer.¹³ For like Homer
the narrator Plato presents us with the figure of the narrator in dialogues, which
combine dramatic and narrative elements¹⁴, which offers the same kind of rhet-
oric of completeness and which in addition to that reflects on what they think
that the audience might expect of their narration. These reflections point to
the poetical discussions of Plato’s times and can be understood – or so I shall
argue – as kind of poetical self-commentaries and as a hermeneutical device.
To prove my case I mainly shall refer to two dialogues, the Phaedo and the
Symposium. I shall suggest reading some passages in the light of the narrative
tradition before Plato and in view of what Plato has to say in the Republic on po-
etry. I shall argue that Plato’s comments on his dialogues not only transform tra-
ditional concepts as they often do¹⁵ and that he takes position in a poetical de-
bate about what a narration should be like, but also that he offers hermeneutical
clues for a better understanding of some peculiarities of his own dialogues.
 For the prooemium see Muthmann 1961. See also (for the Timaeus) Erler 1997.
 For anecdotes concerning dialogues like the Gorgias or the Phaidon see Athen. 11, 505d-506a
= Anecd. 37 Riginos; vgl. Diog. Laert. 3, 35 = anecd. 17 Riginos; cf. Erler 2009a, pp. 61–64.
 See Erler 2009b.
 Cf. Od. 3, 267 sq.; 4, 17 sq.; 8, 73–82.
 For Platonic analysis of different kinds of narratives cf. Pl. R. 392d-394c and Erler 2007,
pp. 71–75. Whether Plato’s categories can be applied to his own dialogues (so for instance de
Jong 1987, pp. 2–5) his been doubted by Halliwell 2009, p. 19 sqq.
 For the tradition of narrative in antiquity see de Jong 1987; de Jong, Nünlist & Bowie 2004;
Schwinge 1991, pp. 482–512; Radke 2007; Köhnken 2006.
104
Michael Erler


Examples from Plato’s dialogues
Let us turn to the Phaedo first. In the introductory conversation¹⁶ of the Phaedo,
Echecrates asks Phaedo to tell him about what happened in Socrates’ last hours.
For, as he says, he had not heard anything about Socrates’ death, whereas Phae-
do – as it turns out – was present at this moment. Since Echecrates wishes to
hear what happened, he asks Phaedo to report what Socrates said and how
he died. In fact, nobody had been present of those able to recount clearly
what Echecrates wishes to be told. So he asks Phaedo to describe the whole sit-
uation in detail, the discussions that took place during Socrates’s last hours in
prison and everything he and his friends did say and do.¹⁷ Phaedo, of course,
is well prepared to tell the story, because – as he explains – to think of Socrates
for him is most pleasurable:
I will try to give you an account of what happened. There is nothing I like better than think-
ing about Socrates, whether I am talking about him myself or listening to someone else
(Phd. 58d; transl. Bluck).
This little conversation at the beginning of the dialogue is remarkable for two
reasons. First, when Echecrates insists that Phaedo should tell both “what was
said” and “what was done” during Socrates’ last day¹⁸, Plato closely links the
dramatic and the pragmatic aspects of the dialogue – Socrates’ pursuit of
truth by arguments and his behaviour – and engages the reader in the search
for truth by considering what has been said and what has been done. Second,
it becomes clear also that a factual report is expected which is based on accuracy
and is elaborated. At the same time these qualities are the reason why the report
will be enjoyed by the narrator– Phaedo – and the recipient of the story – Eche-
crates.
Let us turn now to a second example of a narrator in a Platonic dialogue. At
the beginning of the Symposium we observe quite the same situation. The open-
ing part is composed in dramatic manner.¹⁹ Apollodoros offers a report about the
banquet in honor of Agathos and his victory. Apollodoros thinks he is well pre-
pared for this narration. For only recently – he says – he told an acquaintance –
Glaukon – this very story as well. Now this Glaukon had heard the very story
from somebody else. But he was in doubt whether the report was accurate at
 See Erler 1992 and Erler 1994.
 Cf. Phd. 57a-59c. Translation: Bluck 1955.
 Cf. Phd. 58c.
 Cf. Phaed. 58c and Gallop 2001, p. 281.
Detailed Completeness and Pleasure of the Narrative
105


all, because the chronology of the meeting which was told did not seem to be
correct to him. Yet Apollodoros claims that he had taken care to know exactly
what Socrates said or did on that occasion. By doing so, Apollodoros signals –
as did Echecrates in the Phaedo – that he is also very much interested in the his-
torical aspect of the report, for instance when he assures his audience that he
had checked what was said turning to Socrates several times and asking him
for confirmation. This proves how much he was concerned to check the sources
of what he was told.²⁰ It seems that Plato creates here what could be called a
‘Beglaubigungsapparat’²¹, that is, a feature which will later become typical in
the tradition of ancient novel and in historiography.²² Apollodoros’ narrative is
not just about logoi concerning philosophy, but pretends to be called historia.
So again we observe that accuracy and detailed completeness of the story is
what narrators in Plato are longing for and what is expected of them by their au-
diences. This is an expectation which Plato himself obviously tries to meet when
he gives his dialogues the flavor of historical testimonies by telling stories about
Socratic conversations in great detail and in historical settings.
Another example can be found in other dialogues as well. Very interesting in
this respect is the Theaetetus.²³ Here again a narrator – Eucleides – is well pre-
pared to report a conversation which Socrates once had with Theaetetus. This
narrator was not present in person at the discussion. He therefore tries to get in-
formation from others, takes notes, asks Socrates for confirmation and addition-
al information, and notes down the whole discussion completely and accurately
as a dialogue in writing. Again it becomes clear that the report of Eucleides is
intended to be plausible, complete, detailed and authentic. More than that: It
is expected, that exactly these qualities, this ‘rhetoric of completeness’, is
what the audience expects and what it takes pleasure in, just like Apollodoros
who says in the Symposium that when he talks about philosophy or listens to
others he thinks that he enjoys it very much.²⁴
Let us keep in mind then: The narrators in Plato – as far as we have seen –
all aim at detailed completeness, authenticity and plausibility in their narra-
tions, and by doing this, they obviously think, that stories told that way are re-
garded to be beneficial and enjoyable by the audience.
 Cf. Halperin 1992; Erler 2011.
 Cf. Smp. 172b-e; 173b.
 Cf. Erler 2007, p. 192 sq. See Pl. Prm. 126a sqq. or Ti. 25d sqq.
 Hunter 2006.
 Cf. Tht. 143b sqq.; Erler 2007, p. 79; cf. Halliwell 2009, p. 16 sqq.; Tulli 2011.
106
Michael Erler


Tradition
The expectation of Apollodoros that the report about what happened at the sym-
posium will be pleasurable and useful, and the expectations of other narrators
and audiences in the dialogues, indeed are interesting.²⁵ For they remind one
of the discussions held in Hellenistic times about the utile and dulce as effects
of poetry and narrations. This discussion culminates in what Horace has to
say in the ars poetica about poets that wish to benefit or to please, or to
speak what is enjoyable and helpful.²⁶ Some authors like Eratosthenes²⁷ indeed
argued, that poets aim at psychagogia and do not wish to teach their readers;
others like Aristotle argued, that didactic poems lecture and just because of
that are not to be regarded as poems. According to Horace, Homer’s poems
offer both pleasure and instruction. At least this is what Horace himself experi-
enced – or so he claimed – when reading Homer at Praeneste.²⁸ I would like to
argue, that these alternatives of experiences and expectations – foul or fair, ben-
eficial or edifying or both – point to a tradition which forms the background for
what Apollorodoros or Echecrates have to say about what they expect from a nar-
rative in Plato’s dialogues. Let us remind us for a moment of what we can learn
about the relationship, or rather about the palintonos harmonia, of the concepts
of the beneficial or enchantment – of prodesse or delectare – concerning poetry
or the narrative from Homer onwards.²⁹
Now, while reading Homeric epic we indeed get interesting information
about what the audience expected from a singer and what he was prepared to
offer.³⁰ Most of the evidence comes from the Odyssey. Here Odysseus for instance
makes compliments to the divine singer Demodokos. His song causes delight
(terpein) because he produces a kind of song about the klea andrôn as if he
was present at the events he is talking about, or as if he had heard about
them from others. Demodokos obviously produces a kind of song which was
liked by his audience, because the Phaeacians were delighted by his verses as
was Odysseus in his praise of Demodokos in the Odyssey.³¹ And later on Odys-
seus asks the singer to tell the story of the building of the wooden horse, and
 cf. Smp. 173c.
 Cf. Hor. ars 333f.: aut prodesse volunt aut delectare poetae/ aut simul et iucunda et idonea
dicere vitae cf. Brink 1971, p. 352sqq.; Cf. Hunter 2006, p.301
 Cf. Eratosthenes bei Str. 1, 1, 15.
 Cf Hor. epist. 1, 2, 3f.
 cf. Kannicht 1988, p. 13ff.
 Cf. Od. 1, 337 sqq..; cf. Kraus 1955.
 Cf. Od. 8, 487–98.
Detailed Completeness and Pleasure of the Narrative
107


again he asks for a very detailed story (katà moîran kataléxēs) and was moved to
tears.³²
It becomes clear that ‘To tell a story aright’ as Odysseus sees it, obviously
means not lo leave out any detail, and to seek completeness and authenticity
thanks to the inspiration of an authentic eyewitness. This suggests that a story
like the one sung by Demodokos could be regarded as a kind of history, for it
follows rules, to which later historians would stick. In fact, this is exactly
what Alkinoos asks him to do, i.e. to report accurately or undistorted. And
later Alkinoos confirms, that Odysseus offers a story which is reliable, detailed
and in order. Indeed Odysseus does aim at authenticity when he tells his
story, for instance when he makes use of what could be called a “Beglaubigung-
sapparat” – very much like the one we find in Plato’s dialogues. A good example
of this kind of proof of authenticity can be found in the Odyssey, when Odysseus
narrates how the cattle of Helios were slaughtered on the island of Helios by
Odysseus’ comrades, how Lampetie rushed to Zeus to reveal to him what hap-
pened, how Zeus got angry and convoked the assembly of the gods and promised
that all ships would be destroyed.³³ Now it is interesting that Odysseus, the nar-
rator, thinks it necessary to explain, where he got this story from. And quite un-
derstandably so, because the story he told happened in heaven, where no mortal
was allowed in. He therefore was no eyewitness of what happened there. Yet
Odysseus is able to confirm that his story is true because he was told it by some-
one who got it from an immortal eyewitness.³⁴ Again we realize that Odysseus,
the narrator in the epic, strives for completeness and authenticity – as does
Homer, the author – and that by doing so he obviously meets the expectations
of their audiences. Odysseus practices what indeed has been called a ‚rhetoric
of completeness’, a kind of narration which also was used by a singer like Demo-
dokos and – we may say – was also practiced by the author of the Odyssey – and
Ilias – himself when he performed his epic.³⁵ Obviously this rhetoric of complete-
ness was regarded to create terpsis in the audience, because this kind of narra-
tion was instructive and entertaining at the same time. The more comprehensive-
ly and exactly a story was told, the greater was the terpsis attained by the
singer.³⁶
 Cf. Alkinoos in Od. 11, 363 sqq.
 Cf. Od. 12, 260 –402 , esp. 390; cf. Il. 2, 484–87.
 Cf. Od. 12, 389 sq.
 Cf. Od. 10, 14–16. See also A. R. 1, 20 –22, and Hunter 2005, pp. 156–162; Fantuzzi & Hunter
2002, pp. 311–12.
 Cf. Maehler 1963, pp. 15, 27–31, 34; cf. Latacz 1966, pp. 208–214.
108
Michael Erler


This is confirmed by the famous song of the sirens in the Odyssee. Odysseus
was advised to protect himself against the demonic enchantment of the song of
the sirens. Now, the sirens indeed claim that whoever passes past them would be
entertained and well instructed.³⁷ For the sirens know everything – for instance
about Troy and everthing that Argives and Trojans endured in Troy.³⁸ Here we
have the poetic concept of the Homeric singer: knowledge and pleasure as spe-
cific effects of narration – the more exactly the song is narrated, the more it will
be enjoyable. R. Kannicht drew attention to the fact that here we can observe a
kind of an “immanent narrative theory”³⁹, and in my opinion he argues convinc-
ingly that in Homeric epic – and beyond – pleasure and knowledge are closely
connected with each other, and the effect of a narrative. A story which is narrat-
ed completely and thoroughly is regarded to be entertaining, because it makes
the audience richer in knowledge. Now, all this already points to what we
have observed in the Platonic dialogues. I claim that this forms the horizon of
expectations of audiences also in the dialogues –and one may wonder whether
this is true also as far as Plato’s dialogues as narrations are concerned. Before
turning back to Plato I think it is worth reminding us for a moment of what hap-
pened to the concept of rhetorical completeness after Homer.
Hesiod still seems to share the concept of a combination of enchantment
and knowledge as effect of narrative and poetry. In his Works and Days, however,
it becomes clear that he was convinced that only the person will go home more
enchanted, who participates in the useful knowledge about the world he had to
offer. It also becomes evident that in Hesiod the aspect of usefulness becomes
more and more important, and that there was a gap between the two aspects.
After Hesiod there is a dispute ‘knowledge versus pleasure’. In that debate the
category of literature’s usefulness became the more prominent one.
In fact, usefulness seems to be the essential determination of literature, i.e.
the criterion of poetry, in Solon as well as in Xenophanes. For Xenophanes po-
etry’s uselessness is proven by the fact that the poet lies about the gods.⁴⁰
Solon⁴¹ expects that poems should have a social effect – for instance, to tell
the audience what really matters. Protagonists of utility were poets like Tyrtaios,
and later some Sophists – and finally Aristophanes, who in the Frogs of 405 BC
 Cf. Kannicht 1988, 14.
 Cf. Od. 12, 189–91.
 Cf. Kannicht, 1988, 14.
 Cf. Primavesi 2009, p. 113 sq.
 Cf. Solon frg. 1 Diehl=13 West; cf. Kannicht 1988, pp. 17–19.
Detailed Completeness and Pleasure of the Narrative
109


presents us with the figure of an Aeschylus, who wishes the poet to teach his au-
dience the right behaviour – a position which obviously Aristophanes shared.⁴²
The contrary position, that is, that poetry should just be edifying, also was
propagated – most of all by Gorgias, whose epistemological nihilism only allows
for a paraphrase of the phainomena which in his view cannot be more than an
enchanting description.⁴³ The arousal of emotions is therefore the only effect lit-
erature will and should have, as he tries to show in his Helena. Interpretation of
poetry can therefore be pleasurable, but cannot teach anything.
Narrative Tradition and Plato’s dialogues
It seems to me that this very development and the growing emphasis on the as-
pect of entertainment is of importance for what Plato has to say about the effects
of poetry in his dialogues in general.⁴⁴ For it prompts Plato to be dismissive of
the traditional poetry in the Republic and to regard traditional poetry like the
one of Homer as useless and dangerous just because it stirs up emotions in
the irrational part of the human soul. Furthermore, it causes pleasure and
pain and hinders the rule of reason in the soul of the recipient. But it should
not be overlooked, that Socrates also has to say something about the conditions
which would or could allow for the acceptance of poetry even in Kallipolis. Soc-
rates seems to accept poetry if there would be advocates who are no poets but
lovers of poetry to plead poetry’s cause and would be able to show that literature
or poetry is delightful and beneficial.⁴⁵ But – as we see – this only is possible
under the condition that poetry proves to be pleasant and beneficial for the gov-
ernment and the life of man. So let us keep in mind: For Socrates the combina-
tion of pleasure and usefulness is the conditio sine qua non which makes poetry
acceptable, i.e. Plato wishes to rejoin again the two elements, the delectare and
the prodesse – which were combined in Homer, but got separated afterwards. We
also saw that in Plato’s and Socrates’ times the aspect of pleasure was prominent
amongst Sophists, whereas the aspect of utility was propagated for instance by
Aristophanes.
Seen before this background some features of narrative in the dialogues gain
profile: Echecrates asks for a story about Socrates, because he finds this kind of
story pleasant, and that Apollodoros hopes for entertainment and benefit from
 Cf. Ar. Ra. 686 sq.; Ach. 658; Schwinge 1997.
 Vgl. Gorgias Helena DK 82 B 11; cf. Kannicht 1988, pp. 21–24.
 Vgl. Pl. R. 598d7 sqq.; 606e sqq.; 607d; 599c sqq.
 Vgl. R. 607d.
110
Michael Erler


narrations about philosophical conversation. Both expect stories which are de-
tailed and thorough. For the reader often is reminded of the sources of the dis-
cussion and that the narrator has been doing research in order to fill in gaps if
some information seems to be missing. As in Homer we are confronted with a
’rhetoric of completeness’ that Plato describes, and which causes pleasure in
the audience.
So let us pause for a moment and resume: In narrative situations within
some of his dialogues, Plato obviously illustrates a way of storytelling which
seems to be traditional in that it combines the aspects of completeness, of ben-
efit and pleasure. When for instance Apollodoros expects benefit and pleasure
from a narration⁴⁶ he seems to share the position of Socrates in the Republic
whose close friend he obviously is. So one wonders whether Apollodoros and
Echecrates represent a position, which Socrates would subscribe to and Plato fol-
lows himself in his detailed dialogue-stories.
Plato’s understanding of utility
Though this might seem plausible at first sight, doubts remain. One wonders
whether Plato’s Socrates really has in mind the ‘completeness’ of a story and
a sort of ‘historical record’ each time he postulates that a narration should be
beneficial and entertaining. It is telling that Apollodoros⁴⁷, although he is a
close friend of Socrates and prefers philosophical conversations of rich people,
does not make any difference between Socratic discussions and philosophical
conversations in general. In addition to this, it is not clear to me whether Socra-
tes would share his view on what makes a story beneficial and useful. One won-
ders whether Plato’s Socrates really expects a detailed and complete account and
‘historical record’ also when he postulates that a narration should be beneficial
and entertaining. Now, it is true, a detailed account of what happened in the
sense of historical completeness is what Apollodoros is hoping for and what
he appears to enjoy most, very much as Echecrates does in the Phaedo. This
fits well with what we have learned about the narrative in Homer.
In fact Plato, the author, seems to join this tradition by presenting in his dia-
logues personal which offer stories which strive for detailed completeness, but
 Cf. Smp. 173c.
 The figure of Apollodoros is well discussed by Schirren 1999; for Apollodoros and Socrates
cf. Erler 2009c.
Detailed Completeness and Pleasure of the Narrative
111


also by composing his dialogues as historical narratives and by making use of a
rhetoric of completeness.
What, then, about Plato the philosopher? There are doubts if Plato the phi-
losopher shares the view that this way of story-telling is beneficial in a philo-
sophical understanding. For in the dialogues it becomes also evident that
even a very detailed account of what happened and was said, cannot guarantee
a kind of philosophical insight which alone Plato would regard as beneficial.⁴⁸
Plato makes this clear in the Symposium. In this dialogue Alcibiades believes
he would know who Socrates really is just because he is familiar with every de-
tail of his appearance and behaviour. But it turns out, that Alcibiades does not
know anything about who Socrates really is.⁴⁹ This is confirmed at the beginning
of the Politikos. Here it is shown that detailed description of man’s behaviour or
appearance provides knowledge which is beneficial. According to Plato, knowl-
edge which really is useful and enjoyable can be only gained by reaching out for
the noetic area and by a method which Plato calls dialectic.⁵⁰ Now, it is interest-
ing that Plato in his dialogues illustrates what kind of story could provide an ef-
fect which he would regard as beneficial even from a philosophical point of view.
In the dialogue named after him, Phaedo not only reports a Socratic conversa-
tion and explains that he enjoyed remembering this conversation very much.
He also describes and analyses the very special effect that the conversation
with Socrates had on him – an effect that could be called beneficial. Phaedo
tells us that to his surprise he felt no pity appropriate to the death of a good
friend, but a strange mingling of pain and pleasure. Phaedo indicates that this
was not only the case for himself, but also for his friends:
Well, when I arrived I had an extraordinary sensation. I did not feel pity, as might have been
expected of one who was present at the death of a friend. The man seemed to me to be won-
derfully gifted, Echecrates, in temperament no less than in speech; he died so fearlessly
and nobly. It struck me that even on the point of his departure for the other world Provi-
dence was guiding him, and that even when he reached it, if anyone there has ever enjoyed
blessings, then he would. Consequently, I had none of the sensations of pity that you might
expect a man to have on so sad an occasion. Nor again did I derive pleasure from the fact
that we were engaged in our usual philosophical discussions – for that was the nature of
the conversation. It was simply a rather strange feeling, an unusual mixture of pleasure and
pain combined, which came over me when I reflected that in a very short while he was
 Cf. Pl. R. 379b11; 608e4; Ap. 24e10; Euthphr. 13b-c; Prt. 333d sqq.; Euthd. 280b-c; Grg. 499d;
Men. 87e sqq., 96e.
 cf. Pl. Smp. 213b sqq. and see Erler 2010, pp. 49–54.
 cf. Phd. 69d Cf. Kullmann 1974, p. 132 sqq.
112
Michael Erler


going to die. All of us who were present were affected in much the same way, sometimes
laughing, at times crying (transl. Bluck).⁵¹
Now, what Phaedo says about his emotions is striking indeed. For this disappear-
ing of emotion and the controlled mingling of pain and pleasure, exactly corre-
sponds to the reaction Socrates predicted when analyzing what true philosoph-
ical virtue is. It seems that true virtue causes a kind of katharsis of pleasure and
pain. “Perhaps really, in actual fact, temperance and justice and courage are a
sort of consummated purification of all such sensations, and wisdom itself is
a sort of purificatory rite”.⁵²
Indeed, in the Phaedo, Socrates behaves according to the philosophical un-
derstanding of virtues like bravery or prudence.⁵³ He is presented as an almost
flawless figure without any affection, someone who even sends away his family
in order not to be affected by their emotions. He behaves not like a common
man, but more like a hero – but not like a tragic hero who is affected by great
emotions.⁵⁴ His heroism rather is anti-heroic – it seems – in that he behaves
in every aspect in a self-controlled, rational manner, without misapprehension
and with total control of affections like pleasure or pain. Socrates is well
aware that the Athenian people would interpret the circumstances of his death
in a different way if he were to behave with the conviction of a tragic man –
as he says. Socrates himself therefore reminds us of this contrast in that he dis-
tances himself from a tragic view of the world⁵⁵ and thereby signals that Plato
wishes us to have this contrast in mind. But there is more to it. For we now
can observe that the flawless figure of Socrates has an impact on his friends,
and especially on Phaedo, which confirms the impact that according to Socrates’
argument in the Phaedo true virtue has on other people. Phaedo claims that the
reason for this was the way Socrates behaved when reacting to Phaedo’s obser-
vations.
His analysis is of interest also if one wishes to understand better what Plato’s
Socrates means when he speaks of the benefit of listening to philosophical con-
versation. He obviously means by benefit of a narration about Socrates that Soc-
ratic virtues can unfold their cathartic effect and dry up or mitigate emotions.We
should understand that there is pleasure and benefit to be gained by listening to
the report of a Socratic conversation because such a report has a kind of thera-
 Phd. 58e–59a.
 Phd. 69b-c (transl. Bluck).
 Cf. Halliwell 2002, p. 106 sqq.
 Cf. Phd. 59a; Erler 2011.
 Cf. Phd. 115a.
Detailed Completeness and Pleasure of the Narrative
113


peutic effect on the recipient. As we can see in this concept, pleasure and benefit
are united again.
Of course, poets before Plato like Hesiod or Pindar⁵⁶ were well aware that
logoi can mitigate pain or pleasure, i.e. might have a therapeutic effect on the
audiences. Plato obviously follows this traditional view, but he transforms the
tradition he decides to join in; for he seems to be convinced, that real benefit
cannot be gained by detailed completeness of the story but by the virtues repre-
sented by Socrates. In this – new and Platonic – sense a story about what Soc-
rates did or said provides the audience with pleasure and real – i. e philosoph-
ical – benefit.
Conclusion
In his dialogue Plato the author illustrates different ways of communications and
communicators, and among them narratives and narrators. He also describes dif-
ferent attitudes of the story-teller to his tale and different attitudes with which
the audience receives the tale. It turns out that the story teller strives for detailed
completeness to create pleasure and benefit in the audience. It might be attrac-
tive to ask whether this poetical statement of a person in his dialogues also
might be understood as a hermeneutical device for a better understanding of
Plato’s dialogues as narratives themselves. Indeed there are – or so I think –
good arguments for this. For we have other examples for this kind of hermeneut-
ical devices in Plato’s dialogues like the beginning of the Theaetetus I was refer-
ring to at the beginning of this paper. Here⁵⁷ Plato not only illustrates how a de-
tailed and complete story about Socrates is composed. He also describes how
this narrative is turned into a dramatic dialogue. For Eucleides decides to trans-
form the dihegematic report into a dramatic dialogue because this form is much
more entertaining – as it is argued. Now, it is remarkable that all later dialogues
following the Theaetetus are in dramatic form. The beginning of the Theaetetus
looks like an explanation the author is giving us for this fact. In this paper I
wanted to suggest that the illustration of narrators and narratives as well as
the expectations of the audience can be interpreted as Plato’s reflections
about narrations, narrated dialogues, and the effects these are supposed to
have on the audience. It seems that Plato signals that he wishes to take a
stand in the ongoing poetical discussion about what a good story is for – it
 Cf. Hes. Th. 98ff.; Pi. N. 8, 49 sqq.; Dalfen 1974, pp. 32; 262 sqq.
 Cf. Tht. 142c–143a.
114
Michael Erler


should provide pleasure and benefit. Plato the philosopher, it seems, kind of dis-
tances himself from this tradition of historical completeness as being useful, in
that he replaces the traditional concept of usefulness by his philosophical one.
The famous passage in the Phaedo, where Plato informs us that he was not pres-
ent at the prison at that day⁵⁸, might be taken as a confirmation of this position.
This position foreshadows the Hellenistic concern with the utile and the dulce in
literature. I suggest that there are more passages like the ones we were dealing
with in Plato’s work, which can be regarded as poetical advices which Plato him-
self applied, all of which form part of what I would like to call the implicit po-
etics of Plato’s dialogues, and which once again prove that Plato was a poeta
doctus avant la lettre.⁵⁹
Works Cited
Blondell, R 2002, The play of character in Plato’s dialogues, Cambridge University Press,
Cambridge.
Bluck, RS 1955: Plato’s Phaedo: a translation of Plato’s Phaedo with introduction, notes and
appendices, Routledge, London.
Brink, CO 1971, Horace on poetry: The Ars Poetica, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.
Büttner, St 2000, Die Literaturtheorie bei Platon und ihre anthropologische Begründung,
Francke Verlag, Tübingen.
Clay, D 2000, Platonic Questions, Pennsylvania State Univ. Press, University Park.
Dalfen, J 1974, Polis und Poiesis, Fink, München.
Erler, M 1992, ‘Anagnorisis in Tragödie und Philosophie: Eine Anmerkung zu Platons Dialog
“Politikos”’, Würzburger Jahrbücher für die Altertumswissenschaft, no. 18, pp. 147–170.
Erler, M 1994, ‘Episode und Exkurs in Drama und Dialog: Anmerkung zu einer poetologischen
Diskussion bei Platon und Aristoteles’, in A Bierl, P von Moellendorff (eds), Orchestra.
Festschrift für H. Flashar, Teubner, Stuttgart/Leipzig, pp. 318–330
Erler, M 1997, ‘Ideal und Wirklichkeit: Die Rahmengespräche des Timaios und Kritias und
Aristoteles Poetik’, in Th Calvo & L Brisson (eds), Interpreting the Timaeus-Critias:
Proceedings of the IV. Symposium Platonicum, Academia Verlag, Sankt Augustin,
pp. 83–88.
Erler, M 2003, ‘To Hear the Right Thing and to Miss the Point: Plato’s Implicite Poetics’, in A
Michelini (ed), Plato as Author: The Rhetoric of Philosophy. Acts of the Sample
Symposium of the Cincinnati Classics Department 1999, Brill, Leiden/Boston/Köln,
pp. 153–173.
Erler, M 2007, ‘Platon’, in H Flashar (ed), Grundriss der Geschichte der Philosophie.
Begründet von Friedrich Ueberweg. Völlig neu bearbeitete Ausgabe. Die Philosophie der
Antike, 2/2, Schwabe Verlag, Basel.
 Cf. Phd. 59b.
 Cf. Erler 2003.
Detailed Completeness and Pleasure of the Narrative
115


Erler, M 2009a, ‘Kontexte der Philosophie Platons’, in Ch Horn, J Müller & J. Söder (eds),
Platon-Handbuch, Metzler, Stuttgart, pp. 61–99.
Erler, M 2009b, ‘“The fox knoweth many things, the hedgehog one great thing”: the relation
of philosophical concepts and historical contexts in Plato’s Dialogues’, Hermathena,
no. 187, pp. 5–26.
Erler, M 2009c, “Denn mit Menschen sprechen wir und nicht mit Göttern”: Platonische und
epikureische epimeleia tês psychês, in D Frede & B Reis (eds), Body and Soul in Ancient
Philosophy, de Gruyter, Berlin/New York, pp. 163–178.
Erler, M 2010, ‘Charis und Charisma: Zwei Bilder vom Weisen und ihre Diskussion in Platons
Dialogen’, in D Koch, I Männlein-Robert & N Weidtmann (eds), Platon und das Göttliche,
Attempto, Tübingen, pp. 42–61.
Erler, M 2011, ‘Die Rahmenhandlung des Dialoges (57a-61b, 88c-89a, 102a, 115a-118a)’, in J
Müller (ed), Platon: Phaidon, Akademie-Verlag, Berlin, pp. 19–32.
Erler, M 2013, ‘Plasma und Historie: Platon über die Poetizität seiner Dialoge’, in M Erler, J.E
Heßler (eds), Argument und literarische Form , Berlin/New York 2013, pp. 59–85. (in
print).
Fantuzzi, M & Hunter, R 2002, Muse e modelli, Editori Laterza, Rome/Bari.
Gallop, D 2001, ‘Emotions in the Phaedo’, in: A Havlicek & F Karfík (eds), Plato’s Phaedo,
Oikumene, Prague, pp. 275–286.
Halliwell, St 1997, ‘The Republic’s two critiques of poetry (Book II 376c-398b, Book X
595a-608b)’, in O Höffe (ed), Platon, Politeia, Akademie-Verlag, Berlin 1997,
pp. 313–332.
Halliwell, St 2002, The Aesthetics of Mimesis. Ancient Texts and Modern Problems, Princeton
University Press, Princenton (New J.).
Halliwell, St 2009, ‘The theory and practice of narrative in Plato’, in A Rengakos, J Grethlein
(eds), Narratology and Interpretation: The content of the narrative form in ancient texts,
de Gruyter, Berlin/New York, pp. 15–41.
Halperin, DM 1992, ‘Plato and the erotics of narrativity’, in JC Klagge & ND Smith (eds),
Methods of interpreting Plato and his dialogues, Clarendon Press, Oxford, pp. 93–130
(now in ND Smith (ed), Plato: Critical assessments, Routledge, London/New York 1998,
vol. 3, pp. 241–272.
Hunter, R 2005, ‘Generic consciousness in the orphic Argonautica?’, in M Paschalis (ed),
Roman and Greek imperial Epic, Rethymnon Classical studies 2, Crete University Press,
pp. 149–168.
Hunter, R 2006, ‘Plato’s Symposium and the traditions of ancient fiction’, in JH Lesher, D
Nails, FCC Sheffield (eds), Plato’s Symposium: Issues in Interpretation and Reception,
Harvard University Press, Cambridge (Mass.)/London, pp. 295–312.
de Jong, IJF 1987, Narrators and Focalizers: the presentation of the story in the Iliad, Grüner,
Amsterdam.
de Jong, IJF, Nünlist, R & Bowie, A 2004 (eds): Narrators, Narratees, and Narratives in Ancient
Greek Literature: Studies in Ancient Greek Narratives 1, Brill, Leiden/Boston.
Kannicht, R 1988, The Ancient Quarrel between Philosophy and poetry, University of
Canterbury, Christ Church.
Köhnken, A 2006, Darstellungsziele und Erzählstrategien in antiken Texten, de Gruyter,
Berlin/New York.
116
Michael Erler


Kraus, W 1955, ‘Die Auffassung des Dichterberufs im frühen Griechentum’, Wiener Studien,
no. 68, pp. 65–87.
Kullmann, W 1974, Wissenschaft und Methode, de Gruyter, Berlin.
Latacz, J 1966, Zum Wortfeld “Freude” in der Sprache Homers, Winter, Heidelberg.
Maehler, H 1963, Die Auffassung des Dichterberufes im frühen Griechentum bis zur Zeit
Pindars, Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, Göttingen.
Morgan, KA 2004, ‘Plato’, in IJF De Jong, R Nünlist, A Bowie (eds), Narrators, Narratees, and
Narratives in Ancient Greek Literature: Studies in Ancient Greek Narrative, vol. 1, Brill,
Leiden, pp. 357–374.
Muthmann, F 1961, Untersuchungen zur ‚Einkleidung’ einiger platonischer Dialoge, Diss.
Bonn.
Primavesi, O 2009, ‘Zum Problem der epischen Fiktion in der vorplatonischen Poetik’, in U
Peters & R Warning (eds), Fiktion und Fiktionalität in den Literaturen des Mittelalters,
Wilhelm Fink, München, pp. 105–120.
Radke, G 2007, ‘Die poetische Souveränität des homerischen Erzählers’, Rheinisches
Museum, no. 150, pp. 8–66
Reents, E 1998, Zu Thomas Manns Schopenhauer-Rezeption, Königshausen und Neumann,
Würzburg.
Riginos, AS 1976, Platonica: The anecdotes concerning the life and writings of Plato, Brill,
Leiden.
Rossetti, L & Stavru, A 2010, Introduction, in L Rossetti, A Stavru (eds), Socratica 2008:
Studies in Ancient Socratic Literature, Levante editori, Bari.
Schirren, Th 1999, ‘Apollodoros manikos: Ein textkritisches Problem in Platons Symposion
173d8 und dessen Konsequenzen’, Göttinger Forum für Altertumswissenschaft, no. 2,
pp. 217–236.
Schwinge, E-R 1991, ‘Homerische Epen und Erzählforschung’, in J Latacz (ed), Zweihundert
Jahre Homerforschung, Teubner, Stuttgart, pp. 482–512.
Schwinge, E-R 1997, Griechische Tragödie und zeitgenössische Rezeption: Aristophanes und
Gorgias. Zur Frage einer angemessenen Tragödiendeutung, Joachim Jungius-Gesellschaft
der Wissenschaften, Hamburg.
Tulli, M 2011, ‘Il proemio del Teeteto e la poetica del dialogo’, in M Tulli (ed), L’Autore
pensoso, Fabrizio Serra editore, Pisa/Roma, pp. 121–133.
Detailed Completeness and Pleasure of the Narrative
117



Dino De Sanctis
The meeting scenes in the incipit of Plato’s
dialogue
In a dense succession of allusions and explicit reminiscences, motifs deriving
from the epos, lyrics, paeans and theatre are woven together in the dialogue¹.
Plato draws on these motifs in order to create a new lite prary genre, capable
of reproducing the ever-open συνουσία between master and pupil². In this com-
plex process critics nowadays perceive a testimony marked by maturity and
awareness, along the lines of Kreuzung der Gattungen, as Michael Erler highlight-
ed in outlining the image of Plato as poeta doctus with whom subsequent Hellen-
istic poetry would come into close and fertile contact³. Therefore it is possible to
say that Plato continuously dialogues with the system of literary genres and sig-
nificantly anticipates its developments in Hellenistic period. It is no wonder then
that the meeting scenes between Socrates and his interlocutors assume a partic-
ular importance in this process, from which emerge useful premises for under-
standing the meaning of the dialogue itself ⁴. As well as creating an expertly con-
ceived horizon of expectation for the addressee, in these scenes Plato mostly
evokes the meeting place, a recognizable place in Athens, as well as the time
of the meeting, often ‘today’, ‘νῦν, or ‘yesterday’, χθές⁵. The opening of the Re-
public fits very well into this perspective, as a sort of paradigm. In any case,
in the complex genesis of the dialogue, the Republic imposes itself as a synthesis
carrying particular weight in the λόγος Σωκρατικός, as a type of highpoint, ac-
cording to Charles H. Kahn
,
on the dialectical and pedagogical level in Plato’s
literary experience⁶. It follows that this incipit becomes an important point of ref-
erence for the proemial technique that Plato has inherited from tradition⁷.
 On the so called Gattungsmischung in the Plato’ s dialogue, see Nightingale (1995).
 The dialogue is the crucial form able to pick up the legacy of past literary tradition in a new
perspective: see Andrieu (1954, 304–308).
 For a specific discussion, see Erler (2007, pp. 80 –82) and Murray (1996, pp. 12–14).
 See Burnyeat (1997) on the value and significance of the incipit in Plato’ s dialogues as antici-
pation of general themes.
 In this regard, I make reference to the systematic study by Morgan (2004, pp. 346–368), with a
comprehensive overview of time in the dialogue.
 Kahn (1996, pp. 292–296).
 On this technique from Homer to Hesiod, see Thalmann (1984, pp. 33–77).


At the beginning of the dialogue, Socrates, as is known, gives an account of
a recent journey in the first person, the well-known descent to Pireaus on the oc-
casion of the festivities for Bendis, a new Thracian goddess to Athens (327a1–b5)⁸:
Κατέβην χθὲς εἰς Πειραιᾶ μετὰ Γλαύκωνος τοῦ ᾿Aρίστωνος προσευξόμενός τε τῇ θεῷ καὶ
ἅμα τὴν ἑορτὴν βουλόμενος θεάσασθαι τίνα τρόπον ποιήσουσιν ἅτε νῦν πρῶτον ἄγοντες.
καλὴ μὲν οὖν μοι καὶ ἡ τῶν ἐπιχωρίων πομπὴ ἔδοξεν εἶναι, οὐ μέντοι ἧττον ἐφαίνετο πρέ-
πειν ἣν οἱ Θρᾷκες ἔπεμπον. προσευξάμενοι δὲ καὶ θεωρήσαντες ἀπῇμεν πρὸς τὸ ἄστυ. κατι-
δὼν οὖν πόρρωθεν ἡμᾶςοἴκαδε ὡρμημένους Πολέμαρχος ὁ Κεφάλου ἐκέλευσε δραμόντα
τὸν παῖδα περιμεῖναί ἑ κελεῦσαι. καί μου ὄπισθεν ὁ παῖς λαβόμενος τοῦ ἱματίου, Κελεύει
ὑμᾶς, ἔφη, Πολέμαρχος περιμεῖναι.
For a while now critics have identified here an intentional reference to καταβαί-
νειν, a motif that permeates the archaic epos starting with the Nekyia in the
Odyssey and continuing up as far as Parmenides’ Περὶ φύσεως, by way of Or-
phism⁹. In Plato, therefore, this is a refined example of allusive technique, as
shown in Giorgio Pasquali’s crucial study, a technique indeed that is necessary
and precious for every poetic style¹⁰. In Plato therefore, a deeper poetic strategy
may be perceived in every allusion that his work offers. It is no coincidence that
Mario Vegetti has dedicated memorable pages to the beginning of the dialogue,
highlighting the underlying function they take on within a narrative structure
where, little by little, a process of Kallipolis takes shape in the guise of δικαιο-
σύνη, the wished-for model of the perfect society. In this way the opening the
Republic with Socrates’ Katabasis anticipates in a polarized manner the principal
acquisition of knowledge in the dialogue: an anabasis after the descent¹¹. Con-
sequently it comes as no surprise that, in a excellent monograph dedicated to
the link between Plato and poetry, Mario Regali has returned to the incipit of
the Republic, and he skilfully sets down, in my opinion, the plentiful and func-
tional presence of literary motifs that characterize it in a closely-argued and cer-
tainly programmatic link with the Timaeus. On the occasion of the meeting be-
tween Socrates and the Polemarch and Socrates’ subsequent visit to Cephalus’
abode, the philosophers’ society now experiences the beginning of its consolida-
 Campese (1998, pp. 105–116), examines closely the cult of Bendis in Athens connected to the
Bendideia.
 On the motiv of katabasis from epos to Plato see now Männlein-Robert (2013, pp. 243–244).
 Pasquali (1968
2
, pp. 275–282).
 In order to have the right modus vivendi, i.e. an anabasis, it is necessary an ascent to the
light, made possible by the knowledge dialectics offer, with the guidance and paideutic support
of φιλόσοφος at its center. See Vegetti (1998, pp. 93–104).
120
Dino De Sanctis


tion which, in the fiction of the Timaeus, will reach its apex right in the λόγοι
held between Hermocrates, Timaeus, Critias and Socrates (17a–18c)¹².
Taking this as a starting point, which is useful in order to understand the
meaning that must be grasped in the incipit of the Republic, I believe it is fitting
to reconsider some of the elements present in the scene. First of all, the time-el-
ement in the story: the walk down to the city of Piraeus, narrated by Socrates, is
collocated in a precise chronological dimension, almost ostentatiously so. The
opening of the dialogue κατέβην χθές dominates, and it is no coincidence that
it is clearly in positio princeps, as Diskin Clay has clarified¹³. Then the setting:
the part of Piraeus where Socrates has decided to go in order to observe the
Bendideia is near Athens, but outside the centre of the town. And finally the oc-
casion: the ἑορτή for the goddess, with a procession, the beautiful πομπή that
the people of the place have painstakingly prepared. The brief journey, in the
company of Glaucon, son of Aristodemus, comes to an end when, on the orders
of the Polemarch who from afar has spotted Glaucon and Socrates, a young slave
tugs Socrates’ cloak and invites him to stop. The path of the φιλόσοφος is there-
fore blocked, but this obstacle in its turn leads to a decisive result: the young
man who clutches Socrates’ cloak actually hinders – or at least delays – the re-
turn to the city for the φιλόσοφος. In the framework of the Republic, it is a mo-
ment of intense of realism, by no means isolated in the great panoply of events
and situations that confer such a special aura to the dialogue. The reference to
this same cloak in the Protagoras (335d2–5), for instance, is just as realistic; Ar-
istophanes’ hiccups and the sneeze advised as a remedy by Eryximachus, or the
cockcrow that inaugurates a new day in the Symposium (185d2–3 e 189a), Char-
mides’ headache in Charmides (157b –c). And, of course, just as for the cloak, the
sneeze and the headache, so too does Socrates’ break along the road to Piraeus
in the Republic end up revealing a more complex motivation. This lengthy break
does not represent a useless indulgence, rather does it open up the road to an
unexpected opportunity: observing the evening spectacle of an atmospheric pro-
cession in honour of Bendis, which is a novelty that cannot be passed up, just
waiting to be discovered after dinner and the subsequent discussion in the Po-
lemarch’s house¹⁴.
 Regali (2012, pp. 71–78) suggests that in the incipit it is evident the complex literary genre of
Timaeus through a special characterization of his protagonists.
 In this regard see the detailed exam in Clay (1992).
 On the link between the candlelit procession for Bendis and that by the Panathenaeas in
honor of Athena, see Gastaldi (1998, pp. 117–131).
The meeting scenes in the incipit of Plato’s dialogue
121


In the poetic geography of the Piraeus therefore, the Polemarch’s house is
immediately identifiable as a place of particular substance¹⁵. Here Socrates
finds a community of men ready to start up an intense dialogue with him, begin-
ning with the courteous host, Cephalus, who is seated and has been crowned
after a sacrifice. He is keen to tell how old people often get together with him
to complain about their lost goods, but not before he clarifies, following the sym-
metry of the incipit of the dialogue, that Socrates does not often come down to
the Pireus and visit him in his house, Ὦ Σώκρατες, οὐ δὲ θαμίζεις ἡμῖν καταβαί-
νων εἰς τὸν Πειραιᾶ (328 c6–7)¹⁶.
The opening of the Republic shows how complex the narrative technique is
that distinguishes the meeting scenes described by Plato. It is my intention here
to highlight the role played by Athens in some of these, as it is a crucial frame for
the συνουσία between Socrates and his interlocutors¹⁷. In the dialogue – but
above all in the incipit – Athens is in fact seen like an immense theatrical scenar-
io in which Socrates is the main focus. In this dialogue Athens opposes the out-
side world, the world beyond the walls, because it represents the quintessential
place wherein Socrates carries out his investigations, his ζητεῖν, and makes them
paradigmatic. It is in this sense that the opening of Crito is moving, when Crito
visits Socrates in prison in Athens (43a–43b). It is very early, dawn is just break-
ing. The guard has given permission for this meeting because Crito has at this
stage become his friend, since he visits Socrates so frequently. So far Crito has
admired Socrates, sleeping and alone¹⁸. It is in this sense that the opening of Eu-
thyphro (2a1–2b10) also deserves to be recalled: Euthyphro asks Socrates why he
has left the διατριβαί in the Lyceum and has come to the Porch of the King¹⁹.
The judicial problem emerges immediately, which is centred on δίκη and
γραφή, what emerges above all is the portrait, ambiguous and sarcastic, of the
young and unknown Meletus: there are no facts about this man in Athens, but
he came originally from the Pithus deme and his beard is not yet fully
grown²⁰. Certainly, it is in this sense that the opening of the Gorgias should
also be considered (47a1.5), then Socrates asks Callicles if he has come late to
the feast and politely attributes the blame to Chaeraphon for spending, διατρί-
 As a maritime locality, the Pireus is by no means immune to the risks of brine-filled air and
foreign commerce as Plato recalls in the Laws (IV 704a-715e): see Schöpsdau (2003, pp. 137–145).
 For Cephalus’ profile in the Republic, see in particular Blondell (2002, pp. 165–175).
 In this regard, see Morgan (2012, pp. 415–437).
 On this incipit see Burnet (1924, pp. 254–255).
 For the Euthyphro’ introduction and his legal problems, see Walker (1984, pp. 62–64)
 See Nails (2002, p. 201).
122
Dino De Sanctis


βειν, too much time in the ἀγορά²¹. These are all examples that point to a special
relationship between Socrates and Athens. A bond that can be recognized in the
tone of the opening in the Charmides (135a1–b4)²²:
Ἥκομεν τῇ προτεραίᾳ ἑσπέρας ἐκ Ποτειδαίας ἀπὸ τοῦ στρατοπέδου, οἷον δὲ διὰ χρόνου
ἀφιγμένος ἁσμένως ᾖα ἐπὶ τὰς συνήθεις διατριβάς. καὶ δὴ καὶ εἰς τὴν Ταυρέου παλαίστραν
τὴν καταντικρὺ τοῦ τῆς Βασίλης ἱεροῦ εἰσῆλθον, καὶ αὐτόθι κατέλαβον πάνυ πολλούς, τοὺς
μὲν καὶ ἀγνῶτας ἐμοί, τοὺς δὲ πλείστους γνωρίμους. καί με ὡς εἶδον εἰσιόντα ἐξ ἀπροσδο-
κήτου, εὐθὺς πόρρωθεν ἠσπάζοντο ἄλλος ἄλλοθεν· Χαιρεφῶν δέ, ἅτε καὶ μανικὸς ὤν, ἀνα-
πηδήσας ἐκ μέσων ἔθει πρός με, καί μου λαβόμενος τῆς χειρός, Ὦ Σώκρατες, ἦ δ’ ὅς, πῶς
ἐσώθης ἐκ τῆς μάχης;
What emerges strongly from the details evoked in this scene is the joy on the part
of the person who has been away from his own city and now returns: Socrates.
The lively ἥκομεν, we reached, introduces a sudden account, almost a fairy tale,
set at evening time in the gymnasium of Taureas²³. The long time spent away
from Athens, at war, is concentrated in the διὰ χρόνου. Socrates’ happiness,
and the happiness his return occasions, derives from the chance to frequent
again the places designated for discussions, the συνήθεις διατριβαί²⁴. The
scene is immediately animated by a merry crowd, ready for dialogue: they expe-
rience this great joy in the opening ἁσμένως for Socrates, ἠσπάζοντο for Socra-
tes’ friends. Therefore, what unfolds in the opening lines of the Charmides, well
before the actual encounter, is a scene of return: this return places Socrates, the
φιλόσοφος, in a dimension close to that of Odysseus, the ἥρως. For that again,
just as Odysseus confronts a νόστος in order to re-appropriate his place in Itha-
ca, which has been temporarily lost on account of the Trojan War, in the same
way Socrates’ return is finalized in such a way as to rekindle a wished-for δια-
λέγεσθαι, which had been interrupted by the War in Potidaea²⁵. And the link be-
tween the φιλόσοφος and the ἥρως, at the beginning of the dialogue, is even
more substantial, if one thinks of Socrates’ entrance into the gymnasium
(135b –c). Here, everyone wants to quiz him and Socrates immediately satisfies
his friends’ curiosity about the war with his answers, until they tire of this
 For the proverbial opening of Gorgias, see Sansone (2009, pp. 631–633).
 See now Tuozzo (2011, pp. 101–110).
 The Charmides’ opening recalls the motive of gymnasium as crucial in Lisis. In this regard,
see Penner, Rowe (2005, pp. 231–236).
 In Charmides the διαλέγεσθαι with Socrates is the new kind of poetry. See Tulli (2000,
pp. 259–264).
 On Charmides as a return-dialogue and for the problems linked to its fictive chronology, see
Lampert (2010, pp. 145–15).
The meeting scenes in the incipit of Plato’s dialogue
123


topic. This scene definitely seems to have been modelled on the account that
Odysseus gives the Phaeacians at Scheria, when Alcinous, on discovering the
identity of the castaway that has arrived at his table, puts a series of questions
to Odysseus, to which he will answer with the μεγάλη διήγησις of the Apologoi
(Od. IX–XIII), a long narration structured, in fact, around the dialectic device
of question-answer²⁶.
Therefore, it is now easy to understand why for Socrates, whatever is far
from the city becomes useless, inconvenient, often lacking in anything attractive,
indeed caught up in διατριβή, and silent compared to the great and beneficial
διαλέγεσθαι. In any case, as he reveals before the judges in the Apologia, like
a second Heracles²⁷, in order to discover and locate somebody who is truly
wise, Socrates has to wander from place to place in his city, cope with weariness,
here understandably called πόνοι, after having ascertained the oracle’s answer
(22a–b)²⁸. Far from the streets of Athens, Socrates instead is bewildered. At
the beginning of the Phaedrus, near Ilissus, the countryside opens out before
the eyes of Socrates and Phaedrus, but in the Phaedrus the countryside does
not figure as an attractive place. Little by little, in the fresh country greenness
of the grass and the sun- and cicada-filled trees, the flames of a dangerous am-
biguity are ready to crackle, if there is no-one present that knows how to con-
verse properly. This perspective already emerges at the beginning of the meeting
proper between Socrates and Phaedrus with which the dialogue opens
(227a1–b1)²⁹:
{ΣΩ.} Ὦ φίλε Φαῖδρε, ποῖ δὴ καὶ πόθεν; {ΦΑΙ.} Παρὰ Λυσίου, ὦ Σώκρατες, τοῦ Κεφάλου,
πορεύομαι δὲ πρὸς περίπατον ἔξω τείχους· συχνὸν γὰρ ἐκεῖ διέτριψα χρόνον καθήμενος
ἐξ ἑωθινοῦ. τῷ δὲ σῷ καὶ ἐμῷ ἑταίρῳ πειθόμενος ᾿Aκουμενῷ κατὰ τὰς ὁδοὺς ποιοῦμαι
τοὺς περιπάτους· φησὶ γὰρ ἀκοπωτέρους εἶναι τῶν ἐν τοῖς δρόμοις.
After the greeting, Ὦ φίλε Φαῖδρε, a question gets the discussion under way, ποῖ
δὴ καὶ πόθεν. Socrates shows that he is interested in knowing where his friend
has arrived from. The answer coincides with the focus being placed on Athens:
Phaedrus has come from Lysias’ house, who is staying with the orator, Epicrates,
in a house that used to belong to Maricus, near the temple to Olympic Zeus
 On central dialectic device in epos and in particular after the Apologoi, see Sammons (2010,
pp. 51–56).
 Clay (2000, pp. 51–59) analyzes Socrates as epic hero.
 On Chaerephon’ s question to Pythian Oracles in Apology, see de Strycher, Slings (1994,
pp. 74–82).
 Rowe (1986, p. 135) supposes that “this long introductory section sets the tone of the whole
dialogue”.
124
Dino De Sanctis


(227b4–5). Phaedrus then adds that he is taking a walk outside the walls be-
cause walking along these streets is less tiring than walking under the city’s
porch, as recommended by Acumenos. Immediately, in the incipit of the dia-
logue, Plato shows his interest in the urban geography of Athens with a deliber-
ateness and realism that recall the comedy by Aristophanes, where certain
glimpses of the city emerge with great clarity. In this regard, think of Strepsiade’s
house in The Clouds (32–33) or that of Agathon in the Thesmoforiazusae, which
stands out from the front door, Ὁρᾷς τὸ θύριον τοῦτο; / Νὴ τὸν Ἡρακλέα οἶμαί γε
(25–26)³⁰; think too of the empty Pnyx from whence in the countryside a discon-
certed Dicaeopolis arrives early in the morning in the Acharnians, ὡς νῦν, ὁπότ’
οὔσης κυρίας ἐκκλησίας / ἑωθινῆς ἔρημος ἡ πνὺξ αὑτηί (19 –20)³¹.
But this is not all. The opposition that Phaedrus recalls, between walks with-
in the city, περίπατοι ἐν τοῖς δρόμοις, and the roads outside, περίπατοι ἔξω τεί-
χους, has an obvious function: that of clarifying the pertinent places appropriate
for Socrates, and those that are more appropriate for Phaedrus, who wishes for
peace and quiet and a silent read. The τόπος now reveals an ἦθος, but for it to be
clear, it is necessary, as in the Republic, for Socrates to take some time out in a
different dimension to Athens. In the Phaedrus, therefore, the περίπατοι ἔξω τεί-
χους become the setting for a walk between Socrates and Phaedrus. Socrates in
fact deviates from his preference at his friend’s suggestion and, with a σχολή in
his possession, decides to accompany Phaedrus on his relaxing stroll outside the
walls in order to listen to a speech by Lysias on love³². In this way they leave Ath-
ens behind them and the countryside enters the scene. At first sight this country-
side is luxuriant, sunny and bewitching. Bit by bit, however, with regard to such
lush countryside, Socrates, citizen par excellence, betrays decided embarrass-
ment. Despite the spectacle being so charming, for Socrates the scenery around
Ilissus provokes his irony, because it is a place where man’s presence fades, and
along with it, therefore, any kind of research into understanding him. Socrates is
desirous of learning, he is a φιλομαθής: while the countryside and the trees are
not capable of teaching, διδάσκειν, Socrates reminds us that teaching can only
come from men who live in the city, οἱ δ’ ἐν τῷ ἄστει ἄνθρωποι (230d3–5)³³.
It is no wonder then that Phaedrus, as soon as Socrates decides to stop
under a plane tree, idyllic locus amoenus, perceives in his interlocutor a man
who is ἀτοπώτατος, once he finds himself outside Athens (230c6–d2)³⁴:
 The image of θύριον the often used in comedy: in this regard see Austin, Olson (2004, p. 60).
 Olson (2002, p. 72).
 The σχολή is crucial also for the cicadas’ myth in Phaedrus: see Ferrari (1987, pp. 14–15).
 In this regard, see Heitsch (1993, pp. 71–76).
 On Socrates’ ἀτοπία, see Hadot (1987, pp. 77–116)
The meeting scenes in the incipit of Plato’s dialogue
125


{ΦΑΙ.} Σὺ δέ γε, ὦ θαυμάσιε, ἀτοπώτατός τις φαίνῃ. ἀτεχνῶς γάρ, ὃ λέγεις, ξεναγουμένῳ
τινὶ καὶ οὐκ ἐπιχωρίῳ ἔοικας· οὕτως ἐκ τοῦ ἄστεος οὔτ’ εἰς τὴν ὑπερορίαν ἀποδημεῖς, οὔτ’
ἔξω τείχους ἔμοιγε δοκεῖς τὸ παράπαν ἐξιέναι.
Once he leaves Athens’ walls, Socrates increases his ἀτοπία, he seems to lose his
elected place, his τόπος, together with all the characteristics that connote him in
the city, until he resembles a foreigner being guided by others. Socrates is not a
ἐπιχώριος in the countryside, because he never carries out the ἀποδημεῖν of his
city³⁵.
The initial question that opens the dialogue arouses interest in the meeting
scene between Phaedrus and Socrates: ποῖ δὴ καὶ πόθεν. It arouses interest, in
fact, because what is recognizable here, in any case, and as we shall see imme-
diately, is a precise metrical sequence: a spondee followed by a dactyl. A musical
and calculated echo from a world that feels itself close to poetry. This question
turns up again at the beginning of the Lysis, when Socrates meets a groups of
youths led by Hippothales, Ctesippus and Hieronymus (203a1–b1)³⁶:
ἐπορευόμην μὲν ἐξ ᾿Aκαδημείας εὐθὺ Λυκείου τὴν ἔξω τείχους ὑπ’ αὐτὸ τὸ τεῖχος· ἐπειδὴ δ’
ἐγενόμην κατὰ τὴν πυλίδα ᾗ ἡ Πάνοπος κρήνη, ἐνταῦθα συνέτυχον Ἱπποθάλει τε τῷ Ἱερω-
νύμου καὶ Κτησίππῳ τῷ Παιανιεῖ καὶ ἄλλοις μετὰ τούτων νεανίσκοις ἁθρόοις συνεστῶσι.
καί με προσιόντα ὁ Ἱπποθάλης ἰδών, Ὦ Σώκρατες, ἔφη, ποῖ δὴ πορεύῃ καὶ πόθεν;
Socrates is returning from the Academy to the Lyceum on the road that runs
along the outside walls of the city: he has just arrived at the small door where
Panopea’s well is situated. Here Hippothales exclaims, “ποῖ δὴ πορεύῃ καὶ
πόθεν;” “O Socrates, where are you going and whence do you come?” In this
case, indeed, with the verb πορεύῃ, Hippothales’ question takes on the rhythm
of an iambic trimeter³⁷: Both in the Phaedrus and in the Lysis, the question ποῖ δὴ
(πορεύῃ) καὶ πόθεν therefore evokes a continuous πλάνη, carried out by Socrates
and his interlocutors in a city, Athens, that was in continuous motion. For ποῖ δὴ
(πορεύῃ) καὶ πόθεν, in any case, it is not difficult on a literary level to identify a
clear model that may be traced back to Homer, a model that underlines the meet-
ing between a character and a foreigner³⁸. Think, for example, of the welcome
given by Telemachus to Mentor, in whose likeness Athena arrives on Ithaca,
τίς πόθεν εἰς ἀνδρῶν; πόθι τοι πόλις ἠδὲ τοκῆες; (Od. I 170), – interestingly, Al-
cinous asks Odysseus the same question when he is shipwrecked on Scheria (Od.
 Tulli (1990, pp. 97–105) highlights the irony in the description of locus amoenus in Phaidrus.
 See Martinelli Tempesta (2004, pp. 229–232).
 See Capra (2003, pp. 190 –191).
 On the identification of the guest see de Jong (2001, pp. 25–26).
126
Dino De Sanctis


VII 238) –³⁹; consider the words that Circes says in front of Odysseus and his
companions, who have reached her magical and mysterious abode, ὦ ξεῖνοι,
τίνες ἐστέ; πόθεν πλεῖθ’ ὑγρὰ κέλευθα; (Od. IX 252). The paradigm does not
come across as odd in the Odyssey, where the motif of the journey amounts to
what is practically a constant and pervasive presence. It must certainly be said
that its recurrence in comedy and tragedy was to be frequent. The following rep-
resent some of the many examples: in The Birds (407–408), Euelpides reassures
Pisthetaerus, who fears he is going to die during the tricky task he is about to
undertake. At this point the coryphaeus approaches Hoopoe and asks for
some information about the couple, τίνες ποθ’ οἵδε καὶ πόθεν. Hoopoe’s answer
is eloquent, ξένω σοφῆς ἀφ’ Ἑλλάδος⁴⁰. Apart from Aristophanes, there is above
all Euripides. Electra offers a significant instance (779 –785):
ἰδὼν δ’ ἀυτεῖ· Χαίρετ’ , ὦ ξένοι· τίνες
πόθεν πορεύεσθ’ ἔστε τ’ ἐκ ποίας χθονός;
ὁ δ’ εἶπ’ Ὀρέστης· Θεσσαλοί· πρὸς δ’ ᾿Aλφεὸν
θύσοντες ἐρχόμεσθ’ Ὀλυμπίωι Διί.
κλύων δὲ ταῦτ’ Αἴγισθος ἐννέπει τάδε·
νῦν μὲν παρ’ ἡμῖν χρὴ συνεστίους ὁμοῦ
θοίνης γενέσθαι·
At the beginning of the third episode, after Orestes and Pylades have killed Ae-
gisthus, a messenger tells Electra of the death of her violent stepfather, usurper
of Agamemnon’s kingdom. The messenger formulates his tale in a mimetic man-
ner, reproducing the banter between Aegisthus and Orestes. After seeing the for-
eigners approaching the garden where he has been trimming a myrtle branch for
himself, Aegisthus greets the men that are approaching him with χαίρετε, and
asks them who they are, where they are headed, and from what country they
hail, τίνες / πόθεν πορεύεσθ’ ἔστε τ’ ἐκ ποίας χθονός. After Orestes’ deceitful an-
swer that he is a Thessalian that has come to offer sacrifice to Olympian Zeus,
Aegisthus invites the small army to meet up in his house for a banquet.
This type of meeting, which Plato dramatizes between Socrates and his inter-
locutor in the Phaedrus and the Lysis, seems to take on the features of a typical
dialogical situation, at this base of which it is right to perceive a consistently po-
etic input. In any case, the same question that we observed in the ποῖ δὴ (πορ-
εύῃ) καὶ πόθεν, even if in part varied, opens the Protagoras, when Socrates’
 For this question, similar in Odyssey XIX (104–105), see Garvie (1994, p. 212).
 Various corrections for an acceptable metrical scheme have been made for this section: see
Dunbar (1995, pp. 291–294).
The meeting scenes in the incipit of Plato’s dialogue
127


friend, to whom the story about the meeting with the Sophist will be told, be-
lieves that Socrates is returning from a hunt with Alcibiades, πόθεν, ὦ Σώκρατες,
φαίνῃ; (309a1). But it also opens the Menexenus, {ΣΩ.} ἐξ ἀγορᾶς ἢ πόθεν Μενέξ-
ενος; (234a1), in order to underline the sudden appearance of Menexenus return-
ing from Buleuterius. Here too in these dialogues, in preparation for the subse-
quent theme that will unfold, the incipit focuses on the space of the scene as if
on the stage of some immense urban theatre⁴¹.
A testimony in this sense also reaches us from the opening of Ion, which has
at its centre the meeting between Socrates and a rhapsode⁴². After a special
greeting, τὸν Ἴωνα χαίρειν, the repartee comes fast and furious (530a1–b3)⁴³:
{ΣΩ.} Τὸν Ἴωνα χαίρειν. πόθεν τὰ νῦν ἡμῖν ἐπιδεδήμηκας; ἢ οἴκοθεν ἐξ Ἐφέσου; {ΙΩΝ.}
Οὐδαμῶς, ὦ Σώκρατες, ἀλλ’ ἐξ Ἐπιδαύρου ἐκ τῶν ᾿Aσκληπιείων. {ΣΩ.} Μῶν καὶ ῥαψῳδῶν
ἀγῶνα τιθέασιν τῷ θεῷ οἱ Ἐπιδαύριοι; {ΙΩΝ.} Πάνυ γε, καὶ τῆς ἄλλης γε μουσικῆς. {ΣΩ.}
Τί οὖν; ἠγωνίζου τι ἡμῖν; καὶ πῶς τι ἠγωνίσω; {ΙΩΝ.} Τὰ πρῶτα τῶν ἄθλων ἠνεγκάμεθα,
ὦ Σώκρατες. {ΣΩ.} Εὖ λέγεις· ἄγε δὴ ὅπως καὶ τὰ Παναθήναια νικήσομεν. {ΙΩΝ.} ᾿Aλλ’
ἔσται ταῦτα, ἐὰν θεὸς ἐθέλῃ.
This incipit is redolent of a real stichomythia. Three questions mark the pace of
the dialogue: Socrates asks where Ion has come from, if the inhabitants of Epi-
daurus have set up a race for Asclepius, and whether Ion has won this race. Soc-
rates’ questions alternate with the rhapsode’s answers, until Socrates hopes for
future victories at the Panathenaea games and Ion accepts this good wish, plac-
ing himself in the hands of the god, ἐὰν θεὸς ἐθέλῃ⁴⁴. In Ion too, the opening
with the question, πόθεν τὰ νῦν ἡμῖν ἐπιδεδήμηκας, tends to highlight space
and time. In this dialogue, however, we are not dealing – as in Lysis and Char-
mides – with a specific place in Athens⁴⁵. The impression is that Socrates meets
Ion, who has just arrived, on the city streets and that Ion brings with him a geo-
graphical element, which is simultaneously both recherché and idiosyncratic.
Ion comes from Ionia, which is geographically far from Athens and his name car-
 Tsitsiridis (1998, pp. 129–130).
 Flashar (1958, pp. 17–21) identifies here the particular elements of a typische Dialogsituation.
In general for the problems in this dialogue important observations in Verdenius (1943, pp. 233–
262) and Liebert (2010, pp. 1779–218).
 On the greeting in Ion, see Rijksbaron (2007, pp. 121–125). See also in general on the dia-
logue’s incipit Battegazzore (1969, pp. 5–13).
 Centrone, Petrucci (2012, pp. 314–315).
 In the Protagoras (309d3), in order to indicate the arrival of the Sophist, who has been in the
city for three days, Plato uses the verb ἐπιδημέω with which Ion opens. See Denyer (2008,
pp. 65–67).
128
Dino De Sanctis


ries an echo of this. Furthermore, Ion boasts of an important statute. Indeed,
Socrates greets his interlocutor in an formal tone, τὸν Ἴωνα χαίρειν: this tone
is justified when in the presence of someone of very elevated rank. But this is
not all: Socrates underlines his interlocutor’s foreign identity. He immediately
asks if the rhapsode has come from Ephesus, his native city. Ion’s answer is de-
cidedly, if not deliberately, negative, as the use of the adverb οὐδαμῶς high-
lights, a resolute adverb, which almost seems to prove the rhapsode’s scorn
when faced with the idea that a man as important and busy as Ion could have
enough free time to spend in his homeland. Ion is always travelling around,
from contest to contest, as the initial repartee in the dialogue leads us to be-
lieve⁴⁶.
This behaviour on the part of Ion emerges again when he is asked another
question: when Socrates asks Ion if he is an expert only on Homer, or also on
Hesiod and Archilocus, νῦν δέ μοι τοσόνδε ἀπόκριναι· πότερον περὶ Ὁμήρου
μόνον δεινὸς εἶ ἢ καὶ περὶ Ἡσιόδου καὶ ᾿Aρχιλόχου; (531a1–2), the rhapsode’s
scorn flares up again, as may be seen in the locution “absolutely not”, given
that Ion’s δεινότης is exclusively focused on Homer, οὐδαμῶς, ἀλλὰ περὶ Ὁμήρου
μόνον· ἱκανὸν γάρ μοι δοκεῖ εἶναι (531a3)⁴⁷.
From the very opening of Ion Plato shows a substantial difference between
Socrates and the rhapsode in regard to the problem of their πλάνη, despite the
fact that both of them are completely caught up in a life of wandering.While Soc-
rates’ πλάνη, it could be said, has developed for Athens, Ion is taken up with a
journey that makes no allowance for rests, from Ephesus to Greece, from Epidau-
rus to Athens and then, as may be easily imagined, from Athens to other cities.
During his city journey, Socrates’ quest runs along the lines of ζητεῖν. Ion’s jour-
neying however is different in nature: Ion does not move towards knowledge,
rather does he take for granted that he knows. Indeed, on his busy journey
from Ionia to Greece, Ion shows that he possesses a traditional store of poetry
and knowledge, obsessively static and circumscribed only to Homer in a limiting
and infantile manner. In light of this, the etymological game that Plato, I believe,
advances at the end of the dialogue on the rhapsode’s name is very significant⁴⁸:
{ΣΩ.} Τί δή ποτ’ οὖν πρὸς τῶν θεῶν, ὦ Ἴων, ἀμφότερα ἄριστος ὢν τῶν Ἑλλήνων, καὶ στρα-
τηγὸς καὶ ῥαψῳδός, ῥαψῳδεῖς μὲν περιιὼν τοῖς Ἕλλησι, στρατηγεῖς δ’ οὔ;
 Kahn (1996, pp. 110 –113) analyzes the argumentation until the beginning of Ion as clear evi-
dence of socratic elenchus.
 On nexus “Homer, Hesiod and other poets” in Plato’s dialogues, see Arrighetti (1987, pp. 13–
15).
 Regali (2012, pp. 258–275), analyzes etymological games in Plato’s dialogues.
The meeting scenes in the incipit of Plato’s dialogue
129


Socrates is about to unmask Ion’s useless knowledge: the knowledge that the
rhapsode has gained from Homer ought to make him among the best strategists
in Greece, just as he is effectively one of the best rhapsodes. In actual fact, Ἴων –
despite being the best in both fields, ἀμφότερα ἄριστος ὤν – continues to travel
among the Greeks only as a rhapsode, ῥαψῳδεῖς μὲν περιιών⁴⁹. In this game that
is cultivated and shows great awareness, Ἴων – ὤν – περιιών, all the weakness
inherent in Ion’s τέχνη emerges. It is no coincidence that the περιιέναι is fitting
for Socrates too, after all; but this wandering is conjugated by φιλόσοφος in a
different manner and with different ends compared to the rhapsode. This per-
spective is evident for instance in the Apology (23a–b), when Socrates says
that he goes around Athens, his one and only pole of interest, in order to eval-
uate among its citizens and foreigners who the wisest man is, in this way bring-
ing enmity, calumny and rancour down on his head, ταῦτ’ οὖν ἐγὼ μὲν ἔτι καὶ
νῦν περιιὼν ζητῶ καὶ ἐρευνῶ κατὰ τὸν θεὸν καὶ τῶν ἀστῶν καὶ ξένων ἄν τινα
οἴωμαι σοφὸν εἶναι (23b4–6).⁵⁰
The epichoric character of Socrates’ περιιέναι is reinforced in the incipit of
Ion by his profound ignorance with regard to anything happening outside Ath-
ens, which is very evident at the beginning of the dialogue: in any case, Socrates
knows nothing of what has happened in nearby Epidaurus and has to listen to
Ion in order to get more precise information. But even when he gets the news
about Epidaurus, Socrates is still focused on his own city: it is no coincidence
that he hopes Ion’s victory will come to pass during the Panathenae games, to
the advantage of his fellow citizens and Athens, ἄγε δὴ ὅπως καὶ τὰ Παναθήναια
νικήσομεν (530b1)⁵¹. Actually, if one looks closely, Socrates underlines this ad-
vantage emphatically by associating himself, by means of νικήσομεν, with the
victory he wishes for the rhapsode, as if he too must be the creator of this victory,
if not the only protagonist; this points to the dialectic victory that in a short time
Socrates will gain over Ion. Despite the absence of a specific place in Athens, the
urban horizon is also outlined icastically in Ion, reaching its apex in the ἡμῖν, the
we, which refers to the city as a whole. In this sense, it is useful to remember the
beginning of the Hippias Major (281a1–b1)⁵²:
{ΣΩ.} Ἱππίας ὁ καλός τε καὶ σοφός· ὡς διὰ χρόνου ἡμῖν κατῆρας εἰς τὰς ᾿Aθήνας. {ΙΠ.} Οὐ γὰρ
σχολή, ὦ Σώκρατες. ἡ γὰρ Ἦλις ὅταν τι δέηται διαπράξασθαι πρός τινα τῶν πόλεων, ἀεὶ ἐπὶ
 This game has also been well grasped by Padilla (1992, pp. 124–125), testifying to a more
static Socrates and an Ion who is in continuous movement.
 Heitsch (2002, pp. 91–92).
 Capuccino (2005, pp. 109–115).
 On the general Hippias’ character, see Blondell (2002, pp. 137–154).
130
Dino De Sanctis


πρῶτον ἐμὲ ἔρχεται τῶν πολιτῶν αἱρουμένη πρεσβευτήν, ἡγουμένη δικαστὴν καὶ ἄγγελον
ἱκανώτατον εἶναι τῶν λόγων οἳ ἂν παρὰ τῶν πόλεων ἑκάστων λέγωνται
Like Ion, Hippias, Socrates’ new and special interlocutor, is encountered sud-
denly on the city streets. Significantly, Socrates cries: Ἱππίας ὁ καλός τε καὶ
σοφός, and immediately remembers that after a long absence the Sophist has fi-
nally returned to Athens for us, ὡς διὰ χρόνου ἡμῖν κατῆρας εἰς τὰς ᾿Aθήνας. In-
deed, as Hippias confirms in a tone that is almost smug and yet resigned, Elis,
his homeland, has constant need of his services and when it has to interact with
the other cities, it always calls on the Sophist before any other citizen, since Hip-
pias is the most suitable judge and messenger that Elis has⁵³. Both Ion and Hip-
pias appear in the incipit of the dialogue as strangers who have come to Athens,
men engaged in important business, business that leaves them with little time,
and who are ready to give crucial help to whatever communities they arrive
in⁵⁴. This help will, however, reveal itself to be useless in relation to the higher
and more demanding work that Socrates is trying to carry out. In this way the
rhapsode and the Sophist are united by a desire to know many beautiful things,
πολλὰ καὶ καλά, but also by the fact that they have no actual personal experience
of them⁵⁵.
Before bringing this brief and partial analysis to a conclusion, I would like to
briefly touch on Greek poetry, insofar as it is the second part of the literary dip-
tych, together with the epos, tragedy and comedy, with which, as I have recalled,
Plato was in close contact. In the meeting scenes in the dialogue, the mimetic
component is highlighted by a greeting, an urban space, and realistic gestures
of intimate and ordinary familiarity. Intentional signals of a nuance-filled
world, which Plato offers the reader by means of the delineation of his Socrates.
A similar problem mediated by literary fiction and a learned blend of elements
also emerges from the idyll of Theocritus, whose links to the epos, comedy and
dialogue certainly represent an acquisition for critics of no little significance.
Here, between the urban and pastoral settings, Theocritus often falls back on
the mimetic component in order to create, with the highest possible quantity
of literary elements, a lasting impression of spontaneity. One thinks of the pre-
dialogic frame for the meeting between Lycidas and Simichidas in the bucolic
 On the characterization of Hippias in this dialogue, see Woodruff (1982, pp. 123–132).
 Note also the similarity between Ion and Hippias on the level of looks: both are lovers, so to
say, of luxury and make-up (535d1–3 e 289e6). On irony toward Hippias as sophist without
σοφία at the dialogue’s beginning, see Centrone, Petrucci (2012, p. 43).
 On nexus πολλὰ καὶ καλά see Corradi (2012, pp. 164–165).
The meeting scenes in the incipit of Plato’s dialogue
131


poem known as The Harvest Feast (VII 7–26)⁵⁶; or of the Syracusan Women (XV
1–10) with the question by Gorgo, who wants to know if Praxinoa is at home, as
well as the opening of the dialogue with its wealth of barbed repartee between
the two women⁵⁷; or, above all of the meeting between Aeschines and Thyonicus
(XIV 1–7)⁵⁸:
{ΑΙΣΧΙΝΑΣ} Χαίρειν πολλὰ τὸν ἄνδρα Θυώνιχον.{ΘΥΩΝΙΧΟΣ} ἄλλα τοιαῦτα
Αἰσχίνᾳ. ὡς χρόνιος. {ΑΙ.} χρόνιος. {ΘΥ.} τί δέ τοι τὸ μέλημα;
{ΑΙ.} πράσσομες οὐχ ὡς λῷστα, Θυώνιχε. {ΘΥ.}ταῦτ’ ἄρα λεπτός,
χὠ μύσταξ πολὺς οὗτος,ἀυσταλέοι δὲ κίκιννοι.
τοιοῦτος πρώαν τις ἀφίκετο Πυθαγορικτάς,
ὠχρὸς κἀνυπόδητος· ᾿Aθαναῖος δ’ ἔφατ’ ἦμεν.
The dialogue opens with a greeting with a formal tone: the χαίρειν πολλά now
recalls the χαίρειν in Ion that introduces a meeting between two young friends
that haven’t seen each other for a long time, as the adjective χρόνιος indicates,
and it closely resembles the διὰ χρόνου present both in the incipit of the Hippias
Major and in the incipit of the Charmides⁵⁹. It is immediately obvious how thin
and unkempt Thyonicus is, on account of the suffering the narrator protagonist
has undergone: it is the theme of the idyll, which realistically tackles the prob-
lem of youthful love and its consequences. It is certainly not possible to state
that Theocritus has Plato’s dialogue in mind as a model for this scene, or only
Plato’s dialogue: comedy from Aristophanes to Menandros also plays a crucial
role in the composition and poetics of the idylls, as well as Sophron’s mime,
which was appreciated by Plato himself ⁶⁰. What is certain however is that on ac-
count of the Gattungsmischung that unfolds in the dialogue and to which I allud-
ed at the beginning of this article, it is not unlikely to think that Plato, by creat-
ing in the dialogue a literary space of compelling and modern originality, gave a
remarkable stimulus to the consolidation of a mimetic genre, such as Theocritus’
idyll is, which is sensitive to the need to unite form and content in an elegant and
cultivated blend⁶¹.
I would like to conclude with a well-known judgement from the Peripatetic
School. In the Academicorum Index Philodemus, in his biographical reconstruc-
 On fictional world of Theocritus, see Payne (2007, pp. 49–91).
 Klooster (2011, pp. 108–110) analyzes the spatial references in this Idyll.
 Principal debt of Idyll XIV is to comedy: realism is a good proof of mimesis. In this regard,
see Hunter (1996, pp. 110 –123).
 Gow (1965, pp. 247–248).
 For a discussion on this relationship, see Hordern (2004, pp. 26–29).
 Giuliano (2005, pp. 21–135).
132
Dino De Sanctis


tion of the Academy, cites an excerptum by Dicaearchus (PHerc. 1021, col. I Dor-
andi). According to Dicaearchus, Plato, by means of the εὐρυθμία that infuses
the dialogue with grace, was capable of bringing the φιλοσοφία to an apex of
perfection, even to its dissolution. So these words, as suggestive as they are par-
tially elusive, may be reconsidered. Indeed they can, because the καταλύειν, the
dissolution to which Dicaearchus alludes, coincides perhaps with the beginning
of a new poetic style – or renewed, a poetic style to which Plato as a conscious
innovator, offered opportunities for development that were decisive, crucial and
ineluctable⁶².
Works Cited
Andrieu, J 1954, Le dialogue antique. Structure et présentation, Les Belles Lettres, Paris.
Arrighetti, G 1987, Poeti, eruditi e biografi. Momenti della riflessione dei Greci sulla
letteratura, Giardini, Pisa.
Austin C, Olson S D 2004, Aristophanes. Thesmophoriazusae, Oxford Clarendon Press,
Oxford.
Battegazzore, A M 1969, Platone. Ione, Paravia, Torino.
Blondell, R 2002, The Play of Character in Plato’ s Dialogues, CUP, Cambridge 2002.
Burnet, J 1924, Plato’s Euthyphro, Apology of Socrates and Crito, Oxford Clarendon Press,
Oxford.
Burnyeat, M F 1997, ’First Words’, Proceedings of the Cambridge Philological Society 43,
pp. 1–19.
Campese, S. 1998, ’Bendidie e Panatenee’, in M Vegetti (ed), Platone – Repubblica, Volume I,
Bibliopolis, Napoli, pp. 105–116.
Capra, A 2003, ’Poeti, eristi e innamorati: il Liside nel suo contesto’, in S Martinelli Tempesta
& F Trabattoni (eds), Platone. Liside Volume 2, LED, Milano, pp. 173–231.
Capuccino, C 2005, Filosofi e rapsodi. Testo, traduzione e commento dello Ione platonico,
CLUEB, Bologna.
Centrone, B, Petrucci, F 2012, Platone. Ippia maggione, Ippia minore, Ione, Menesseno,
Einaudi, Torino.
Clay, D 1992, ’Plato’s First Words’, Yale Classical Studies 29, pp. 113–129.
Clay, D 2000, Platonic Questions. Dialogues with the Silent Philosopher, The Pennsylvania
State University Press, University Park.
Corradi, M 2012, Protagora tra filologia e filosofia. Le testimonianze di Aristotele, Serra,
Pisa-Roma.
de Jong, I J F 2001, A Narratological Commentary on the Odyssey, CUP, New York.
de Strycher E, Slings S R 1994, Plato’s Apology of Socrates. A Literary and Philosophical
Study with a Running Commentary, Brill, Leiden-New York.
Denyer, N 2008, Protagoras. Plato, CUP, Cambridge.
 Gaiser (1988, pp. 326–328).
The meeting scenes in the incipit of Plato’s dialogue
133


Dunbar, N 1995, Aristophanes. Birds, Oxford Clarendon Press, Oxford.
Erler, M 2007, Platon, Grurdriss der Geschichte der Philosophie, Die Philosophie der Antike,
Schwabe, Basel.
Murray, P 1996, Platon on the Poetry: Ion, Republic 376e-389b, Republic 595–608b, CUP,
Cambridge.
Nails, D 2002, The People of Plato. A Prosopography of Plato and Other Socratics, Hackett
Publishing Company, Indianapolis-Cambridge.
Ferrari, G R F 1987, Listening to the Cicadas. A Study of Plato’s Phaedrus, CUP, Cambridge.
Flashar, H 1958, Der Dialog Ion als Zeugnis platonischer Philosophie, Akademie Verlag,
Berlin.
Gaiser, K 1988, Philodems Academica, Friedrich Frommann Verlag, Stuttgart.
Garvie, A F 1994, Odyssey. Books VI-VIII, CUP, Cambridge.
Gastaldi, S 1998, ’Bendidie e Panatenee’, in M Vegetti (ed), Platone – Repubblica, Volume I,
Bibliopolis, Napoli 1998, pp. 117–131.
Giuliano, F M 2005, Platone e la poesia. Teoria della composizione e prassi della ricezione,
Academia Verlag, Sankt Augustin.
Gow, A S F 1965, Theocritus, edited with a Translation and Commentary, I-II, CUP, Cambridge.
Hadot, P 1987, Exercices spirituels et philosophie antique, Albin Michel, Paris.
Halliwell, S 2002, The Aesthetics of Mimesis. Ancient Texts and Modern Problems, Princeton
University Press, Princeton.
Heitsch, E 1993, Platon Phaidros. Übersetzung und Kommentar, Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht,
Göttingen.
Heitsch, E 2002, Platon Apologie des Sokrates. Übersetzung und Kommentar, Vandenhoeck &
Ruprecht, Göttingen.
Hordern, J H 2004, Sophron’s Mimes. Text, Translation and Commentary, Oxford Clarendon
Press, Oxford–New York.
Hunter, R 1996, Theocritus and the Archeology of Greek Poetry, CUP, Cambridge.
Kahn, C 1996, Plato and the Socratic Dialogue. The Philosophical Use of a Literary Form, CUP,
Cambridge
Klooster, J 2011, Poetry as Window and Mirror: Positioning the Poet in Hellenistic Poetry,
Brill, Leiden-Boston.
Lampert, L 2010, How Philosophy Became Socratic. A Study of Plato’s Protagoras, Charmides
and Republic, University of Chicago Press, Chicago-London.
Liebert, R S 2010, ’Fact and Fiction in Plato’s Ion’, American Journal of Philology 131,
pp. 179–218.
Männlein-Robert, I 2013 ’Katabasis und Höhle. Philosophische Entwürfe der (Unter‐)Welt in
Platons Politeia’, in N Notomi & L Brisson (eds), Dialogues on Plato’ s Politeia
(Republic). Selected papers from the IX Symposium Platonicum, Academia Verlag, Sank
Augustin, pp. 243–244.
Martinelli Tempesta, S 2003, Liside. Platone, edizione critica e commento filologico, Volume
1, in S Martinelli Tempesta & F Trabattoni (eds), Liside. Platone, LED, Milano.
Morgan, K A 2004, ’Plato’, in I J F de Jong, R Nünlist, A Bowie (eds), Narrators, Narratees and
Narratives in Ancient Greek Literature, Brill, Leiden-Boston, pp. 357–376.
Morgan, K A 2012, ’Plato’, in I J F de Jong (ed), Space in Ancient Greek Literature, Brill,
Leiden, pp. 415–437.
134
Dino De Sanctis


Nightingale, A W 1995, Genres in Dialogue. Plato and the Construct of Philosophy, CUP,
Cambridge.
Olson, S D 2002, Aristophanes. Acharnians, Oxford Clarendon Press, Oxford.
Padilla, M 1992, ’Rhapsodic Plato? Ion’ s Re-presentation’, Lexis 9–10, pp. 121–145.
Pasquali, G 1968
2
,’Arte allusiva’, L’ Italia che scrive 25, 1942, pp. 185–187, now in Pagine
stravaganti di un filologo, II, Stravaganze quarte e supreme, Le lettere, Firenze,
pp. 275–282.
Payne, M 2007, Theocritus and the Invention of Fiction, CUP, Cambridge.
Penner T, Rowe C J 2005, Plato’ s Lysis, CUP, Cambridge
Regali, M 2012, ’Hesiod in the Timaeus: the Demiurge addresses the Gods’, in G R
Boys-Stones & J H Haubold (eds), Plato and Hesiod, Oxford University Press, Oxford,
pp. 259–275.
Regali, M 2012, Ιl poeta e il demiurgo: teoria e prassi della produzione letteraria nel Timeo e
nel Crizia di Platone, Academia Verlag, Sankt Augustin.
Rijksbaron, A 2007, Plato. Ion. Or: On the Iliad, Brill, Leiden-Boston.
Rowe, C J 1986, Plato. Phaedrus, Aris & Phillis, Warminster.
Sammons, B 2010, The Art and the Rhetoric of the Homeric Catalogue, Oxford University
Press, Oxford.
Sansone, D 2009, ’Once again the Opening of Plato’s Gorgias’, Classical Quarterly N S 59,
pp. 631–633.
Schöpsdau, K 2003, Platons Nomoi, Buch IV-VII, Übersetzung und Kommentar, Vandenhoeck
& Ruprecht, Göttingen.
Thalmann, W G 1984, Conventions of Form and Thought in Early Greek Epic Poetry, John
Hopkins University Press, Baltimore-London.
Tsitsiridis, S 1998, Platons Menexenos. Einleitung, Text und Kommentar, Teubner, Stuttgart.
Tulli, M 1990, ’Età di Crono e ricerca sulla natura nel Politico di Platone’, Studi Classici e
Orientali 60, pp. 97–115
Tulli, M 2000, ’Carmide fra poesia e ricerca’, in T M Robinson & L Brisson (eds), Plato.
Euthydemus, Lysis, Charmides. Proceedings of the V Symposium Platonicum. Selected
Papiers, Academia Verlag, Sankt Augustin, pp. 259–264.
Tuozzo, T M 2011, Plato’s Charmides. Positive Elenchus in a “Socratic” Dialogue, CUP,
Cambridge.
Vegetti, M 1998, ’Κατάβασις’, in M Vegetti (ed), Platone – Repubblica, Volume I, Bibliopolis,
Napoli 1998, pp. 93–104.
Verdenius, W J 1943, ’L’Ion de Platon’, Mnemosyne III S 11, pp. 233–262.
Walker, I 1984, Plato’ s Euthyphro, Scholars Press, Chico.
Woodruff, P 1982, Plato. Hippias Major, Blackwell, Oxford.
The meeting scenes in the incipit of Plato’s dialogue
135



Gilmário Guerreiro da Costa
The Philosophical Writing and the Drama
of Knowledge in Plato
To Ligia
1.
By virtue of a remarkable irony, attempts to defend Plato against accusations of
dogmatism often assert the ambiguous and rich nature of his writing. This issue
is precisely the rejected trait in Phaedrus (275a) which is now endowed with
greater strength and persuasion. In other words, the philosopher meets his
other, the artist. To a great extent, this phenomenon is due to the fact that in
Plato′s dialogue we read the great drama of knowledge and research, a great
achievement of the Greek culture. The present essay tries to discuss some explan-
atory and comprehensive possibilities of this phenomenon in the platonic text.
We will focus on three elements closely related to each other: the singularity
of his writing, its artistic feature, and the critical and ambiguous gesture with
which he establishes his thematic and formal relation with the tragedy.
The writing of the dialogues moves a textual scene in which it deploys, with
a peculiar feature, the most different problems of the philosophy. Such a proce-
dure displays the disquieting nature of the thinking in its search of the truth. Re-
gardless of the higher or lower success in this pursuit, the thinking ended indel-
ibly marked. The marks left are the result of a deep pedagogical zeal, under the
effigy of the great master, Socrates, as well as of devices built with rare art in the
weaving of the dialogues.
The writing reunites in this challenge with its other – the reader, whose be-
haviour is ambiguous, in a mixture of interpretation and interpellation. He reads
the text, but also participates in the textual play, reacting to it and giving a
meaning for it. It is in the movement manner and temporality of the writing
that it calls for the approach to the eternity of Ideas. The paradox may be appa-
rent – which does not fade the dramatic frame of this project.
2.
Platonic reflection either by its textual configuration, or by the themes which it
faces, proves to be especially useful in order to encourage a dialogue between


philosophy and literature. To express it in a hermeneutic way, the writer Plato
often rearranges the data of this “approximation in the distance”, putting in
the proscenium certain questions that will be obsessively incorporated all over
the history of philosophy.
In the interplay between literature and philosophy one must insure oneself
against some methodological pitfalls, especially the presumption of extracting
from the literary work some general philosophical truths, as if the literary text
would be nothing more than a simple illustration of those ideas. In a rare gesture
of lucidity and humbleness, Benedito Nunes admitted that he incurred in similar
misconception when he wrote his first book about Clarice Lispector:
Assim, nesse primeiro estudo, intitulado O mundo de Clarice Lispector, apresentei a ficção
da romancista de A paixão segundo G.H. como uma ilustração do pensamento sartriano. Eis
o parco rendimento – ou rendimento nulo? – da Crítica desenvolvida como paráfrase filo-
sófica. (Nunes, 1993, p. 197–8)¹
Among the more specific literary features which the author states he had forgot-
ten, we can highlight the character′s building, the peculiarities of the language,
and the relations between history and discourse. By serving up the example of
Walter Benjamin, Nunes says that the only way of bringing justice to the de-
mands of truth regarding the relationship between literature and philosophy
would be to provide the necessary attention to the truth of the work as fiction,
as literature.
According to Professor Nunes, the required dialogue between philosophy
and literature would make hermeneutics a proper methodological exercise capa-
ble of overcoming misunderstanding and arbitrariness. In this context, he
strongly questions the legitimacy of an exhaustive scientific analysis of the liter-
ary work (Nunes, 1993, p. 198). We will stress a bit later how much the statement
of inexhaustibility of the literary texts reaches the Platonic writing as well. It is
the requirement to do justice to the Greek philosopher: to protect him from ac-
cusations of dogmatism. Such a proposal addresses the guidelines of the proper
Platonic text – the dialogue as a mobile effigy of persistence in the pursuit of
philosophical truth in its dramatic, uncertain hue.
In a paper full of suggestions and investigative paths, Jeanne Marie Gagne-
bin focuses on the analysis and interpretation of what she calls “the literary
 “Thereby, in this first study, entitled The world of Clarice Lispector, I introduced the novelist′s
fiction of The passion according to G. H. as an illustration of the Sartrean thought. Here is the
meager income – or thought an null income? – of the critic developed as a philosophical
paraphrase.”
138
Gilmário Guerreiro da Costa


forms of philosophy” (2006). This frame, according to her, has the advantage of
resisting a plan which is merely normative: “Tal recorte tem a vantagem de não
colocar de antemão uma questão normativa sobre as diferenças, os direitos, os
domínios respectivos dos discursos literários e filosóficos” (Gagnebin, 2006,
p. 201)². She deems it necessary, as a preparatory test, that one revisit the prob-
lem of the interplay between form and content. There is in this item a remarkable
Benjaminian substratum: “não só quais “conteúdos filosóficos” estão presentes
ali, mas como são transformados em “conteúdos literários”.” (Gagnebin, 2006,
p. 201)³. Often the distinctions between form and content show ineffectiveness
and insufficient procedures to take either philosophy or literature into consider-
ation.
The characterization of the craft of the writer and the philosopher dissemi-
nates lots of clichés, such as the assertion of laying with the philosopher the re-
sponsibility for thinking, and with the writers, for written expression. With re-
gard to philosophy these stereotypes express suspicion with rhetoric. The text
in a broad sense is used only as a tool: “Até no próprio meio filosófico, por ex-
emplo, na academia, reina certa desconfiança em relação aos aspectos formais
mais apurados de uma palestra oral ou de um texto escrito de filosofia.” (Gag-
nebin, 2006, p. 202)⁴.
Nonetheless, a closer examination of this issue reveals the inadequacy of
the dichotomous statement that emerges from these commonplaces. According
to Gagnebin, in an insightful affirmation, thought is not elaborated without
language, “sem o tatear na temporalidade das palavras” (Gagnebin, 2006,
p. 202)⁵. Language is poured into metaphors and rhetoric, and philosophical
writing makes use of this heterogeneous matter, consciously or not. It follows
the emphasis on the interplay among form, exhibition, and knowledge linked
to these considerations. They intertwine internally so that the shape resists
being merely an adornment.
The study of the form-dialogue in Plato, in this context, is emblematic. It
would explain the apparent inconsistencies and deadlocks of the Platonic phi-
losophy. The complex movement of life unveils itself in the dialogues. Doing
 “Such frame has the advantage of not putting in advance normative questions about differen-
ces, rights, the respective domains of the literary and philosophical discourses.”
 “not just which “philosophical contents” are there, but as well in which way they are turned
“literary contents”.”
 “Even in the very philosophical middle, the academy, prevails suspicion of a more accurate
presentation of an oral or a written text of philosophy.”
 It translates as follows: “without groping in the temporality of words.”
The Philosophical Writing and the Drama of Knowledge in Plato
139


an amazing mimesis they extract in their form a moving picture of the human
existence reality, of knowledge, or rather, the drama in the pursuit of knowledge:
Se levarmos a sério a forma diálogo, isto é, a renovação constante do contexto e dos inter-
locutores, o movimento de idas e vindas, de avanços e regressos, as resistências, o cansaço,
os saltos, as aporias, os momentos de elevação, os de desânimo etc., então percebermos
que aquilo que Platão nos transmite não é nenhum sistema apodítico, nenhuma verdade
proposicional, mas, antes de mais nada, uma experiência: a do movimento incessante
do pensar, através da linguagem racional (logos) e para além dela – “para além do conceito
através do conceito”, dirá também Adorno (Gagnebin, 2006, p. 204).⁶
The mimesis, supposedly expelled during the representation of the content of
life, meddles in the webs of the very formal constitution of the dialogues. This
is also an experience of thinking, wherein not only Socrates′ interlocutor, but
also the readers are invited to attend.
3.
In a model essay written about Goethe′s Elective Affinities, Walter Benjamin puts
forward a dual contribution that interests us. The first binds to the status of the
interplay between form and content. Seeming to fail due to an excessive dichot-
omy, he replaces the terms at issue by the concepts of truth content (Wahrheits-
gehalt) and material content (Sachgehalt). His interest lies in underlining the im-
miscibility of these elements in the work of art. He draws up a sort of law of
literary writing: “plus la teneur de vérité d′une oeuvre est significative, plus
son lien au contenu concret est discret et intime” (Benjamin, 2000, p. 274–5).
This is the affirmation of the truth of the work as fiction. In an apparent para-
doxical gesture, it is by pretending in its configuration that the artistic weaving
allows us to discern the intimate reading of reality, of what goes beyond it. On
the other hand, such a text confines and grants the gift of its idiosyncratic intel-
ligibility, intrinsically poetic.
The second Benjaminian contribution binds to what he calls expressionless.
He delineates the problem this way: “C′est lui qui brise en toute belle apparence
 “If we take seriously the dialogue-form, i.e., the constant renewal of the context and of the
interlocutors, the movement of comings and goings, advances and returns, resistances, fatigue,
the jumps, the deadlocks, the movements of elevation, of dismay etc., then we realize that what
Plato conveys is by no means an apodictic system, no propositional truth, but an experience: of
the ceaseless movement of thought through rational language (logos) and beyond it – beyond
concept through concept, as Adorno would say.”
140
Gilmário Guerreiro da Costa


ce qui survit en elle comme héritage du chaos : la fausse totalité, celle qui s′égare
– la totalité absolue. N′achève l′oeuvre que ce qui la brise, pour faire d′elle una
oeuvre morcelée, un fragment du vrai monde, le débris d′un symbole.” (Benja-
min, 2000, p. 363) The dialectical finesse crafts this passage. The work results
from the chaos that it tries to exorcise in organizing itself as a cosmos. In
doing so, it sought to erase the traces of the process, pretending settle any
debt that hinted. However, language keeps with itself the memory of this
proud deletion of the origin. That is what Benjamin calls expressionless. The le-
gitimate offer of the totality is served by the very impossibility of the work. It
ends to direct it to the fragments which border the chaos, and thus donate the
portion of truth that is due to this entire process. It uncovers a kind of a revela-
tion of the tragic debt of the writing. This is especially true in the Platonic dia-
logues. It seems to us legitimate to approach this sort of analysis with some con-
siderations on the figure of the instant, exaiphnes (156 d–e), as it lies in a
passage of the Parmenides, by Plato. It comes out during the course of a debate
about the relationship between motion and rest:
For there is no change from rest while resting, nor from motion while moving; but the in-
stant, this strange nature, is something inserted between motion and rest, and it is in no
time at all; but into it and from it what is moved changes to being at rest, and what is
at rest to being moved. (Plato, 1997, 156d–e)
The instant is characterized as something of a “strange nature” (physis atopos),
without a place (a-topos). Such a peculiarity enables it to function as an interme-
diary (metaxy) between motion and rest. Although the term does not have a con-
ceptual formulation, it suggests an appreciation for the temporality. It gives some
clues to transcend critically the deadlocks to which the dialogue had led. Its role
in this sense is especially important to ensure a bond between one and many.
Fernando Rey Puente (2010) claims that the figure of time in Plato would
lead to resistance either to Neoplatonic interpretations, or to Nietzschean
ones. In the same order they both use such categories of transcendence and eter-
nity in the analysis of the theory of ideas. The observation made by the author
becomes more vigorous when he analyses the function played by this temporal
figure, the instant, in the broader context of the Platonic philosophy. In referring
to the passage of the allegory of the cave, when the prisoner is suddenly (ex-
aiphnes) freed from his bonds, Puente states: “Esse “salto epistemológico” é
como que o resultado produzido subitamente depois de longa e paciente fre-
The Philosophical Writing and the Drama of Knowledge in Plato
141


quentação e exercitação.” (Puente, 2010, p. 53)⁷. In the specific case of the Par-
menides, the instant is precisely the figure which shows suspicion with regard to
a supposed intransigent dualism in the thought of the Greek philosopher: “Pla-
tão parece estar, na verdade, muito mais interessado nos metaxý do que em uma
transcendência radical⁸.” (Puente, 2010, p. 57). The instant thus gives rise to a
double productive interruption: in the context of knowledge, when the subject
is allowed to reach a more advanced level of the understanding of the world;
and of the ontological bond between the multiplicity of forms and phenomena.
Monique Dixsaut claims the focus of this passage is the quest to explain the
change: “Si donc changer, on ne peut le faire sans changer, quand change-t-on?”
(Dixsaut, 2003, p. 140). In this sense, it would not connect eternity and time, as
held in the Neoplatonic interpretation of the Parmenides. This remark seems to
be correct. And yet, the instant (exaiphnes) appears to work as a figure of this
relationship. It approaches the eternity on this point: they both suspend time.
Nonetheless, they differ in that the eternal returns to itself, in the unity of its rec-
ollection, of all things extraneous to becoming, while the instant only prepares a
new round of confrontation of the coming-to-be in the multiplicity and immerses
in the vicissitudes of time. From the safe return (paradoxically temporary) to the
eternal, to the subjection to the will of the tragic game in the world.⁹
In any case, the fundamental a-topic character of the instant should be
stressed: it is not in time precisely because it means the interruption of time, al-
lowing for change and becoming: “Le changemente est cet événement pur qui in-
terrompt le cours et la succession du temps qui s′avance” (Dixsaut, 2003, p. 140).
It could be asked if the very texture of the Platonic dialogue, on the threshold of
silence that often surrounds it, could not bear exactly this kind of interruption.
Would some of the allure of the Platonic writing not lie in this – not only in the
temporality of enrollment in the debates, but also in the silence of its recurrent
interruption in the unusual way in which he ends (often an ending without end)
his works?
 “This “epistemological leap” comes as a sudden result after long and patient attendance and
exercises.”
 “Plato seems to be actually much more interested in the metaxý than in a radical transcen-
dence”
 Such are recurring figures in the modern lyric poetry. Take, for example, these verses of Sal-
vattore Quasimodo: “Ognuno sta solo sul cuor della terra / trafitto da un raggio di sole: / ed è
súbito sera” (QUASIMODO, 1999, p. 18–9). Here it is delineated a kind of interruption which sug-
gests tragic contours, due to a state of things disinterested in human, extraneous to the intelli-
gent sensitivity (logopoetic) of poetry and philosophy.
142
Gilmário Guerreiro da Costa


4.
A study of textuality in the Platonic dialogues may benefit from some aspects of
the hermeneutical research of Paul Ricoeur. In his essay “The hermeneutical
function of distanciation”, he aims at articulating two elements frequently re-
garded as irreconcilable: to respect the living and multiple core of existence,
but, at the same time, to avoid the loss of meaning by dispersing and becoming.
It thus implies to resist a kind of abstraction that provides us with a cognisable
structure of reality, but void of strength, and an innocent immersion of becom-
ing, which, if on the one hand it offers considerable vitality, notwithstanding it
imposes considerable obstacles to the intelligibility of these phenomena.
Consistent with this project, the philosopher presents his thesis: he aims at
overcoming the traditional opposition between explanation (explication) and un-
derstanding (compréhension). Such a gap between the two procedures stems
from the struggle of hermeneutics, especially with Wilhelm Dilthey, to protect
human phenomena from the causal uniformity peculiar to the researches in nat-
ural science in his time. Through a way of investigation different from this type of
scientific procedure, which is based on logical and causal explanation, under-
standing, as defended by Dilthey, would be more consistent with the specificity
of the human sciences. In these sciences, rather than separation, we find the em-
pathy of the subject in front of an other that, far from being objectifiable, also
emerges as a subject to whom we interpret, and from whom we are interpreted
and questioned as well.
Although representing an important step in safeguarding the peculiarity of
human study, such distinction would lead to deadlocks and excesses. In the
case of Hans-Georg Gadamer, the tension between the two methodological oper-
ations leads to antinomy. The title of his masterpiece, Truth and method, accord-
ing to Ricoeur, should be changed to Truth or method.
However, does this separation correspond effectively to the destination of
hermeneutics and of the human sciences? Ricoeur denies it firmly. The several
extracts analyzed by him highlight various plans of distanciation which could
not be attributed to the explanatory conduct of the natural sciences. In some
way, men experience in their own spirits′ operations the distanciation. Now it
is not something imposed from outside through an abstraction resulting from
methodology. Precisely because it emerges from the game of empathy and dis-
tanciation, the link between understanding and explanation reveals itself not
only possible, but necessary as well (Ricoeur, 1982).
It will be with the notion of text that the philosopher introduces some paths
to overcome the aforementioned antinomy. The text is “the paradigm of distan-
The Philosophical Writing and the Drama of Knowledge in Plato
143


ciation in communication”, it is “communication in and through distance” (Ric-
oeur, 1982, p. 131). The next step will then explain the criteria of textuality from
which he serves in order to present his study: “the realization of language as dis-
course”; “the realization of discourse as structured work”; “the relation of speak-
ing to writing in discourse and in the works of discourse”; “the work of discourse
as the projection of a world”; “discourse and the work of discourse as the medi-
ation of self-understanding” (Ricoeur, 1982, p. 132). These last three elements con-
cern us most directly here.
The written text is not confined to the intentions of its author. It reaches au-
tonomy, giving to Verfremdung a positive accent which it did not manifest in Ga-
damer’s hermeneutics. Furthermore, the work transcends its psychosocial con-
text, opening up to multiple readings. Its movement goes from a
decontextualization to a recontextualization effect by the act of reading. The dis-
tantiation thus reveals as constitutive of the work, it is both what must be over-
come, and what limits the interpretation as well. In a remark which should not
be indifferent to Plato′s readers, the French philosopher maintains that from
these mechanisms come the changes in the functioning of reference: “The pas-
sage from speaking to writing affects discourse in several other ways. In partic-
ular, the functioning of reference is profoundly altered when it is no longer pos-
sible to identify the thing spoken about as part of the common situation of the
interlocutors.” (Ricoeur, 1982, p. 140). More specifically, literature leads the ques-
tion of reference to another level – destruction of the world to achieve it in its
innermost essence. Its critical potentiality lies in this – it opens fissures through
which one can still think. In this aesthetic space is evidenced not only a episte-
mological, but also an ethical and political demand:
The role of most our literature is, it seems, to destroy the world. That is true of fictional lit-
erature – folktales, myths, novels, plays – but also of all literature which could be called
poetic, where language seems to glorify itself at the expense of the referential function
of ordinary discourse. (Ricoeur, 1982, p. 141)
This investigation indicates important and active tasks for the reader. Self-under-
standing in front of the work becomes not a rational act of imposition, but of ex-
posure. In an enlightening paradox, we can only find ourselves as readers, if we
lose ourselves: “As reader, I find myself only by losing myself. Reading introdu-
ces me into the imaginative variations of the ego. The metamorphosis of the
world in play is also the playful metamorphosis of the ego.” (Ricoeur, 1982,
p. 144). It reveals the insufficient character of appropriation as obliteration of
distance: in the world of the work we distance ourselves from ourselves.
144
Gilmário Guerreiro da Costa


The study of Platonic argumentation, as carried out by Franco Trabattoni,
seems to strengthen such an investigative thread. There would be in the Greek
philosopher a precocious hermeneutic consciousness, especially the bottomless-
ness of language: “Nisso, manifesta-se, de fato, uma característica estrutural e
não eliminável do pensamento e da linguagem, ou seja, sua infinita declinabili-
dade, sua substancial falta de fundo.” (Trabattoni, 2010a, p. 17)¹⁰ This movement
would have been silenced by Aristotle, being responsible for concealing a fecund
way of research about the dialogues, as the author argues in a provocative mo-
ment (2010a). In this endless stream of possibilities in language, the Platonic
dialogues weave strategically the circular and endless motion of thinking. It
stands out a picture of a philosopher against dogmatism, turning unjustified
one after another criticism brought against him by sections of the so-called post-
modern thought. It is a bold thesis, one cannot deny it.
From this reasoning follows the necessary care with the Platonic writing,
stressing its hermeneutical substrates, weaved in a precarious way, as it is com-
mon to the very act of writing. Rhetoric, far from being the opposite of logos, may
be the medium in which the drama of knowledge spreads. The dialogues would
be a way of representing the non-exhaustiveness of the world in which man lives,
what the author calls “vicariousness”. This is precisely, according to him, the
meaning of the theory of ideas. The Platonic reminiscence configures the asser-
tion of the endless wandering of thought:
Essa situação é expressa por Platão por meio da metáfora (mesmo que, talvez, não se trate
só de uma metáfora) da doutrina da reminiscência, segundo a qual conhecer é recordar:
um recordar que, evidentemente, se desenvolve por rastros, lampejos e resíduos, logo
não pode mais reunir o estado de exaustividade a que uma definição gostaria de aspirar.
(Trabattoni, 2010a, p. 14–5)¹¹.
Within this stream of questions and inquiries, philosophy outlines its most fertile
ways of improvement and progress. Nonetheless, one does not do justice to Plato
if, when resisting the accusations of dogmatism, we turn his thought into a pure
skeptical play or into relativist complacency. For this is exactly what the dia-
logues do not do. Aware of these risks, Trabattoni claims to be peculiar to Platon-
ism the commitment to the interplay between unity and multiplicity: “a unidade
 “It manifests itself, in fact, a structural and non eliminable feature of thought and language,
i.e., its endless deviation, its substantial bottomless.”
 “This situation is expressed by Plato through the metaphor (though perhaps this is not just a
metaphor) of doctrine of reminiscence, according to which knowledge is remembering: a remem-
bering that of course develops through traces, glimpses, wastes, therefore it can no longer gather
the state of completeness to which a definition would aspire.”
The Philosophical Writing and the Drama of Knowledge in Plato
145


do múltiplo” (2010a, p. 22).¹² The Socratic question, in this sense, does not in-
tend to reach the absolute truth, but rather to stage the universal: “põe em evi-
dência o terreno do universal em que move o logos” (2010a, p. 23).¹³ The de-
construtive maelstrom in its obsession with difference would be intelligible
only if articulated to Platonism, this alleged other against which it launched
so many criticisms. Nevertheless, the defense of such articulation between
unity and multiplicity does not mean that its possession is something peaceful,
easy. Otherwise, it becomes evident exactly the precariousness of the search.
The Platonic argumentation, its textual craft, resists at one stroke dogma-
tism and skepticism¹⁴. These are the essential conditions for building a dialogue,
or at least the expectation of its possibility. The élan of this approach in the dis-
tance, made possible (or at least desired) through dialogue, relies on expectation
of a genuine encounter, under the sign, although still imprecise, of the truth. If
someone has the truth, suspends time, and dictates the way to follow; but if this
approach is impossible, conversation becomes a vain game. Such are the de-
mands of dialogue, in particular, and of philosophy, in general. It is ascribe to
Plato the boldest convergence between the two instances.
5.
Showing that when preparing a hypothesis, rigor can pay tribute to the beauty,
Jeanne Marie Gagnebin argues that, as Homer in the exercise of offering eternal
glory to his heroes, Plato also would weave similar frames in his dialogues: a
monument to the glory of Socrates. It is a reminiscence that is stated in the pre-
cariousness of the poetic word:
 “the unity of multiple”.
 “It points out the universal′s ground in which logos moves”.
 In an important research on the subject of politics in the Platonic philosophy, Mario Vegetti
emphasized an element of interest to this discussion: the defence of the polysemy of the Platonic
text: “Esforços hermenêuticos orientados podem, diria, devem ser levados a cabo, porque um
excesso de tolerância acarreta um pressuposto de irrelevância teórica da interpretação, mas é
igualmente verdade que estes esforços devem, por outro lado, aceitar uma margem irredutível
de polissemia do seu objeto: o pensar filosófico de Platão – pela mesma forma textual em
que é representado – não pode ser reduzido a um sistema unívoco de significados.” (VEGETTI,
2010, p. 272-3) [“Oriented hermeneutical efforts oriented can, I would say, should be carried out,
because an excess of tolerance implies a presumption of theoretical irrelevance of interpretation,
however it is equally true that these efforts must, on the other hand, accept an irreducible mar-
gin of polysemy of its object: Plato′s philosophical thinking – due to the textual form in which it
is represented – cannot be reduced to a system of univocal meanings.”
146
Gilmário Guerreiro da Costa


o impulso para filosofia em Platão – em particular para escrever diálogos filosóficos, apesar
de suas numerosas críticas à escrita –, provém não só de uma “busca da verdade”, meio
abstrata, mas também da necessidade, ligada a essa busca, de defender a memória, a
honra, a glória, o kléos do herói/mestre morto, Sócrates. (Gagnebin, 2006b, p. 196)¹⁵
This hypothesis aims at strengthening itself through analysis of some dialogues,
especially the Apology. When Socrates reflects on his choice of a life dedicated to
the truth, even under the most different risks, he is inserted in the affirmative
framework of his peculiar heroism: “Nesse contexto, podemos também dizer
que Platão assume, em relação ao mestre morto, a mesma função que cabia
ao poeta em relação aos heróis mortos: lembrar suas façanhas e suas palavras
para que a posteridade não se esqueça dos seus nomes e de sua glória.” (Gagne-
bin, 2006b, p. 196)¹⁶ Such a project will require the Greek philosopher to care for
the texture of the dialogues, which is characterized by the effort to provide that
“exemplary image” of Socrates. Fiction in this sense would not be the reverse of
truth, but its pursuit by other means: “Todos os estudiosos de Platão que anali-
sam, por exemplo, as encenações iniciais dos diálogos, sabem dessas constru-
ções complexas (para não dizer… sofisticadas!).” (Gagnebin, 2006b, p. 198)¹⁷
It is necessary to understand, in this scenario, the reasons for the author′s
absence as subject of the utterance of the dialogues. According to Gagnebin,
this is justified by the pursuit of guaranteeing objectivity (Gagnebin, 2006b,
p. 198–9). The answer is, in general, correct. However, it is insufficient. More-
over, it seems to us that Plato absents himself so that the drama (the scene)
may emerge, thereby ensuring strength to the scene′s exhibition – of which
also result the writing′s precariousness and temporality.
But is he absent at all? Is this his intent? He operates the drama chosen by
him. Fiction strengthens truth. At the same time, through the combination of sta-
bility and precariousness of the writing, he stages the living and risky character
of this search. The heroic act celebrated in the Homeric poems has its perfect
counterpart in the dialogue′s weaving, taking Socrates′ life as its object. Still con-
cerning the “exemplary death” of Socrates, as it was built in the dialogues, some
 “The drive to philosophy in Plato – in particular to write philosophical dialogues, despite his
numerous criticisms of writing – stems not only from a “search for truth”, kind of abstract, but
also from the necessity, connected to that search, to defend the memory, the honour, the glory,
the kléos of the dead hero/master, Socrates”.
 “In this context we can also say that Plato assumes, regarding the dead master, the same
function that was incumbent on the poets to do with regard to dead heroes: remembering
their exploits and words so that the posterity does not forget their names and their glory”.
 “Every Plato′ scholar who examines, for instance, the dialogues′ initial staging, know these
complex constructs (not to say… sophisticated!)”.
The Philosophical Writing and the Drama of Knowledge in Plato
147


additional considerations. It seems that the assembly of Apology, Crito and Phae-
do provide evidence of a bold Platonic procedure of writing: he works on meta-
phors of death, and death as a metaphor, a gesture constitutive of human cul-
ture, to which Plato′s writing gave an unforgettable shape.
6.
Aristide Valentin is a character of detective stories created by G. K. Chesterton. In
a melancholic moment, when he compares his work with that of criminals, he
remarks to himself: “The criminal is the creative artist; the detective only the crit-
ic” (Chesterton, p. 15) The critic and the reader in search of traces and clues left
by the text – the criminal as an image of transgression, and the detective as an
hermeneutist of transgression, and at the same time who restores the order,
which is expressed in the temporality of reading. To let us utilize the beautiful
title of a Martha Nussbaum′s book, it is a kind of “fragility of reading”.
Hans Robert Jauss wrote in 1977 a text in a similar direction on the aesthetic
pleasure, entitled “The aesthetic pleasure and basic experiences of poiesis, aes-
thesis and catharsis” (Jauss, 2011). Initially, he does a retrospection of the main
theorists who addressed the issue. He makes them dialogue with each other and
then presents his own perspective, a part on which we will focus on here.
Human action in aesthetic activity moves under three functions: poiesis, aes-
thesis, and katharsis. The first binds to “obra que nós mesmos realizamos”
(Jauss, 2011, p. 100)¹⁸ In turn, the aisthesis configures the pleasant reception,
the renewed and intensified vision. Regarding the catharsis, it refers to the lib-
erating transformation of the everyday automatism:
Designa-se por katharsis, unindo-se a determinação de Górgias com a de Aristóteles, aquele
prazer dos afetos provocados pelo discurso ou pela poesia, capaz de conduzir o ouvinte e o
espectador tanto à transformação de suas convicções quanto à liberação de sua psique.”
(Jauss, 2011, p. 101)¹⁹
These three functions find themselves in a dynamic exchange, overlapping and
connecting to each other. The author gives us good example, which also points to
intertextual elements, by stressing the moment when the aisthesis would turn
 “the work that we ourselves performed”
 “By joining the determination of Gorgias with Aristotle, catharsis is designated as that pleas-
ure of affections caused by speech or poetry, capable of conducing both the listener and the
spectator either to transform their believes or to release their psyche”.
148
Gilmário Guerreiro da Costa


into poiesis, as the reader, realizing the presumed incompleteness of the asthetic
object, may “sair de sua atitude contemplativa e converter-se em co-criador da
obra, à medida que conclui a concretização de sua forma e de seu significado.”
(Jauss, 2011, p. 103)²⁰ The text concludes with a luminous quotation by Goethe:
Há três classes de leitores: o primeiro, o que goza sem julgamento, o terceiro, o que julga
sem gozar, o intermédio, que julga gozando e goza julgando, é o que propriamente recria a
obra de arte. (Jauss, 2011, p. 103)²¹
The act of reading thus reveals remarkable complexity. Far from being a mere
texts’ decoding, it assumes the risks of creative participation in the aesthetic
process. And it is in the experience of aesthetic pleasure that the dichotomy of
enjoyment and judgment has more consistent opportunities to be overcome.
Reading loses innocence, but it now claims the right to create. It is not satisfied
with being the inferior double of the texts′ world, rather it intends to question
them and recreate them under the sign of the highest demands of their time.
And the requirements made by the Platonic writing are high. Its dramatic
character, akin to theatre, demands of readers an active procedure, similar, as
Nussbaum points out, to the spectator′s movements in the tragedy: “Like the
spectator of a tragedy, the dialogue reader is asked by the interaction to work
through everything actively and to see where he really stands, who is really
praiseworthy and why.” (Nussbaum, 2001, p. 126–7) The dialogue-form, as the
author explains, encourages critical judgment. It represents not only the interloc-
utors′ scene, but also the virtual scene of the readers′ intervention. As we see it,
the silence of reading is similar to “a silent inner conversation of the soul with
itself” (Plato, 1921, 263e).
According to Nussbaum, however, comparison to tragedy should not over-
look the many differences between the two genres, especially by their effect,
since the Platonic writing moves to respond the intellect’s appeal. Even myths
bind to a philosophical account, leading to a progressive abstraction: “He is
using it not to entertain in its own right, but to show forth general philosophical
truths for which he has already argued” (Nussbaum, 2001, p. 131). But some con-
siderations about the place of imagination in these myths seem to lack in this
study, particularly in its metaphorical content. Ricoeur thus conceives the act
 “get out of his contemplative attitude and become a co-creator, as he completes the achieve-
ment of its form and its meaning”.
 “There are three classes of readers: the first, who enjoys without judgment; the third, who
judges without enjoying; and the second, who judges enjoying and enjoys judging, is that
which exactly recreates the work of art”.
The Philosophical Writing and the Drama of Knowledge in Plato
149


of imagining: “Imagining is to be absent in entire things” (Ricoeur, 1992, p. 155).
The French philosopher′s approach is phenomenological. His impulse, neverthe-
less, matches the aspirations of the Platonic philosophy, the writing of it, in its
materiality, leads to the purification of dealing with everyday objects so as to
achieve them, paradoxically, in its absence, in the deepest level of understand-
ing. Imagining and thinking imply each other, and shines through the seductive
scene of the Platonic language.
In this context, some passages of the Symposium can be enlightening. The
dialogue opens with the representation of the reminiscence plan which unfolds
throughout the book. In these multiple narratives, one inside the other, such as
the satyrs′ statues mentioned by Socrates, we find a fictionist’s art. Aristodemus
had told the story he had witnessed to Apollodorus, and from this to his listeners
in the dialogue: “Si donc il me faut, à vous aussi, faire ce récit, allons-y” (Platon,
2011a, 173c), not only to the partner, but also to the readers. In the traces of rem-
iniscence, the strength and fragility of the Platonic knowledge′s drama is insinu-
ated. Apollodorus, in the very beginning, confesses: “Il faut dire qu′Aristodème n
′avait pas un souvenir exact de ce que chacun avait dit, et moi non plus je me
souviens pas de tout de qu′il a raconté” (Platon, 2011a, 177e). It is worth mention-
ing, in this way, the memory′s productive character – and of the reading. In a
passage filled with irony, Guimarães Rosa wrote: “The book may be worthy
due the things that could not be in there” (Rosa, 1994, p. 526). In the interstices
of the Symposium, on the level of remembrance, a bet of seduction lies: that the
readers may accept the invitation to enjoyment and thinking. To judge by the
Rosa′s note, the value of this work relies on similar intervention.
We referred above to figures of Plato′s interruption. The comic upheavals in
Symposium are quite suggestive in this regard. Primarily, Socrates′ delay, im-
mersed in his thoughts (174d–175c). A little further on, before Aristophanes
could deliver his speech, he had begun to hiccup (185d–e). Both scenes make
someone crack a smile, albeit a discreet one, akin to the enjoyment of the spi-
rit′s identity with itself, even from the contradictions of an event. Gesture op-
posed to reverence, thus preparatory to philosophy. There are also two other in-
terruptions, at Alcibiades′ arrival (212c–d), and the entry of the revelers (223b).
These events break certain expectations of order, thereby the text moving theat-
rically. Here a closed argument is not enough – it is also necessary to please, to
arouse pleasure.
The construction of the sophist’s image in the Sophist is similar to such a
gesture, moved by great art of drafting and mordacity, through definitions
with which dialectics pays tribute to irony and humour. Let us take some exam-
ples. At first, the sophist is presented with a hunter′s properties, distinguished by
his prey, namely, young rich: “But the other turns towards the land and to rivers
150
Gilmário Guerreiro da Costa


of a different kind – rivers of wealth and youth, bounteous meadows, as it were –
and he intends to coerce the creatures in them” (Plato, 1921, 222a). The second
characterization binds to the merchant′s art: the sophist imports knowledge
(mathematopolike) and virtue (224c). He does not deal with knowledge, but
with its appearance, because he is only interested in profit and ostentation:
“Then it is a sort of knowledge based upon mere opinion that the sophist has
been shown to possess about things, not true knowledge” (Plato, 1921, 233c),
points out the Stranger in dialogue with Theaetetus. The sophist thus offers
doxa, not episteme.
Another piece in this representation, recurrent in the Platonic work, and ar-
ticulated here in double voice, combines sophistic procedures and imitation. His
words, filled with deception, simulate a reality which effectively constitutes only
a distorted doubling (234d). If someone advocated the dualism, that would be, in
practice, the sophist, not Plato. It is the sophist who produces through simulacra
(phantasma) the world′s deceitful double. For this reason, “he must be classed
as juggler and imitator” (Plato, 1921, 235a).
Notwithstanding, one might as well submit the Platonic questioning the sim-
ilar suspicion that the sophist image′s construction is made by means of an art
equally mimetic. By refuting the legitimacy of the philosophical and pedagogical
work of these men due to the fact that it is established through imitation, Plato
does it with resources which turn out to be mimetic as well. One might object
that this exercise does not produce simulacra, but the actual image of these
thinkers. If so, there would be a legitimate mimetic art – that emerges not exactly
from the content of the debates, but from the very form of dialogue. Yet the ten-
sion (dramatic?) seems to establish.
7.
There are not many philosophers, like Plato, who give such great importance to
the effect of an artistic work on the public. Highlighting the risks to which we are
exposed in the proximity to art, he takes very seriously the expressive strength of
poetry, especially the tragic one. It is a remarkable and ambiguity care that seeks
to warn us about the dangers of something, but in the end awakes interest pre-
cisely for this kind of experience. Furthermore, it allows us to glimpse fissures in
the anthropological project based on the control of the so called soul′s upper
Baixar 3.45 Mb.

Compartilhe com seus amigos:
1   ...   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   ...   25




©historiapt.info 2022
enviar mensagem

    Página principal