Plato’s Styles and Characters



Baixar 3.45 Mb.
Pdf preview
Página1/25
Encontro11.07.2022
Tamanho3.45 Mb.
#24222
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   25
(Beiträge zur Altertumskunde 341) Gabriele Cornelli - Plato’s Styles and Characters Between Literature and Philosophy-Walter de Gruyter (2016)



Gabriele Cornelli (Ed.)
Plato’s Styles and Characters


Beiträge zur Altertumskunde
Herausgegeben von Michael Erler, Dorothee Gall,
Ludwig Koenen und Clemens Zintzen
Band 341


Plato’s Styles and 
Characters
Between Literature and Philosophy
Edited by 
Gabriele Cornelli


ISBN 978-3-11-044403-2
e-ISBN (PDF) 978-3-11-044560-2
e-ISBN (EPUB) 978-3-11-043654-9
ISSN 1616-0452
Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data
A CIP catalog record for this book has been applied for at the Library of Congress.
Bibliographic information published by the Deutsche Nationalbibliothek
The Deutsche Nationalbibliothek lists this publication in the Deutsche Nationalbibliografie;
detailed bibliographic data are available on the Internet at http://dnb.dnb.de.
© 2016 Walter de Gruyter GmbH, Berlin/Boston
Printing and binding: Hubert & Co. GmbH & Co. KG, Göttingen
Printed on acid-free paper
Printed in Germany
www.degruyter.com
The publication of this book has been supported by the International Plato Society
the Archai UNESCO Chair / Universidade de Brasília and the CAPES/ Coordenação de
aperfeiçoamento de pessoal de nível superior/ Ministry of Education/Brazil.


To Samuel Scolnicov

(1941–2014)



Table of Contents
Introduction
1
Plato’s Literary Style
Samuel Scolnicov
Beyond Language and Literature
5
Raúl Gutiérrez
The Three Waves of Dialectic in the Republic
15
Mary Louise Gill
Plato’s Unfinished Trilogy: Timaeus–Critias–Hermocrates
33
María Angélica Fierro
The Myth of the Winged Chariot in the Phaedrus: A Vehicle for Philosophical
Thinking
47
Lucas Soares
Perspectivism, Proleptic Writing and Generic agón: Three Readings of the
Symposium
63
Graciela E. Marcos de Pinotti
Plato’s Argumentative Strategies in Theaetetus and Sophist
77
José Trindade Santos
“Reading Plato’s Sophist”
89
Other Genres and Traditions
Michael Erler
Detailed Completeness and Pleasure of the Narrative. Some Remarks on the
Narrative Tradition and Plato
103


Dino De Sanctis
The meeting scenes in the incipit of Plato’s dialogue
119
Gilmário Guerreiro da Costa
The Philosophical Writing and the Drama of Knowledge in Plato
137
Marcus Mota
Comic Dramaturgy in Plato: Observations from the Ion
157
Mario Regali
Amicus Homerus: Allusive Art in Plato’s Incipit to Book X of the Republic
(595a –c)
173
Fernando Muniz
Performance and Elenchos in Plato’s Ion
187
Mauro Tulli
Plato and the Catalogue Form in Ion
203
Fernando Santoro
Orphic Aristophanes at Plato’s Symposium
211
Álvaro Vallejo Campos
Socrates as a physician of the soul
227
Silvio Marino
The Style of Medical Writing in the Speech of Eryximachus: Imitation and
Contamination
241
Esteban Bieda
Gorgias, the eighth orator. Gorgianic echoes in Agathon’s Speech in the
Symposium
253
Beatriz Bossi
Plato’s Phaedrus: A Play Inside the Play
263
VIII
Table of Contents


Plato’s Characters
Gabriele Cornelli
He longs for him, he hates him and he wants him for himself: The Alcibiades
Case between Socrates and Plato
281
Debra Nails
Five Platonic Characters
297
Francisco Bravo
Who Is Plato’s Callicles and What Does He Teach?
317
Michele Corradi
Doing business with Protagoras (Prot. 313e): Plato and the Construction of a
Character
335
Marcelo D. Boeri
Theaetetus and Protarchus: two philosophical characters or what a
philosophical soul should do
357
Christian Keime
The Role of Diotima in the Symposium: The Dialogue and Its Double
379
Contributors
401
Citations Index
407
Author Index
411
Subject Index
419
Table of Contents
IX



Introduction
The significance of Plato’s literary style to the content of his ideas is perhaps one
of the central problems in the study of Plato and Ancient Philosophy as a whole.
As Samuel Scolnicov pointed out in this collection, many other philosophers
have employed literary techniques to express their ideas, just as many literary
authors have exemplified philosophical ideas in their narratives, but for no
other philosopher does the mode of expression play such a vital role in their
thought as it does for Plato. And yet, even after two thousand years, there is
still no consensus about the reason why Plato expresses his ideas in this distinc-
tive style. Selected from the first Latin American Area meeting of the Internation-
al Plato Society (www.platosociety.org) in Brazil (20 –24th August, 2012), the fol-
lowing collection of essays presents some of the most recent scholarship from
around the world on the wide range of issues related to Plato’s dialogue form.
The meeting was organized by Archai Unesco Chair on The Plural Origins of
Western Thought of the University of Brasilia (www.archai.unb.br) and the Pla-
tonists Brazilian Society (www.platao.org), with a generous support of the Inter-
national Plato Society, University of Brasilia and the Coordination for the Im-
provement of Higher Education Personnel (CAPES) of the Brazilian Ministry of
Higher Education.
Scholars in Platonic studies gathered together at this conference and ex-
plored new paths of research in the field, despite the divergence of opinion
among the participants, at the end. There is a lot to be learnt from a closer ex-
amination of Plato’s literary art of writing philosophy in its cultural and histor-
ical context. Understanding how Plato turned the various styles and devices of
his predecessors into elements of his own writing is a key step in assessing
the real singularity of his writing and the conception of philosophy it conveys.
Plato’s use of characters is one of the exciting fields of research now on the
table. As central feature of Plato’s way of writing philosophy, it that needs to
be understood in its singularity in comparison to others genres of writing also
using characters before him – poetry, history, etc.
The contributions can be divided into three categories. The first addresses
general questions concerning Plato’s literary style. The second concerns the re-
lation of his style to other genres and traditions in Ancient Greece. And the
third examines Plato’s characters and his purpose in using them.
Samuel Scolnicov, Raúl Gutiérrez, and Mary Louise Gill address the general
question of the dialogue form for Plato’s thought. María Angélica Fierro and
Lucas Soares explain Plato’s use of specific literary devices, such as myth, alle-
gory, perspective, and prolepsis. And Graciela E. Marcos de Pinotti and José Trin-


dade Santos reflect upon Plato’s use of language in the development of his argu-
ments.
Michael Erler and Dino De Sanctis provide comparisons of the dialogues
with other narrative styles of the time. Gilmário Guerreiro da Costa, Marcus
Mota, Fernando Muniz, Mario Regali, Mauro Tulli, and Fernando Santoro ad-
dress the relation of Plato’s thought and writing to Ancient Greek poetry.
Álvaro Vallejo Campos and Silvio Marino explore the use of medical terminology
and ideas in the dialogues. Esteban Bieda and Beatriz Bossi discuss Plato’s com-
plex relation towards the use of rhetoric in philosophic teaching.
Gabriele Cornelli, Debra Nails, Francisco Bravo, and Michele Corradi address
the question of the relation between Plato’s characters and the historical individ-
uals they represent, while Marcelo D. Boeri and Christian Keime examine the
purpose of the characters in the dialogues.
Through these essays readers will have an understanding of the complexity
of issues surrounding Plato’s combination of literature and philosophy. They will
also be able to access the most recent developments on these topics from various
approaches – from the ’analytic’ to the ’continental’, from the established tradi-
tions in Europe and North America to the emerging Platonic scholarship in South
America.
I would like to express my deepest gratitude to the Archai team for help me
to organize the venue in such an effective way, and especially to Nicholas Riegel,
who worked very hard on the revision of the papers here published.
A last remark is very much needed. Samuel Scolnicov, one of the authors of
this book, died in August 13, 2014, while this book was being prepared. Samuel
was born on March 11, 1941 in Brazil and immigrated to Israel in 1958. His out-
standing scholarly productivity is very well known: he wrote not only in English,
but also in his native Portuguese and in Hebrew. He was between the small
group of international Plato scholars who founded the International Plato Soci-
ety in 1989, and served as its President from 1998–2001. Samuel truly embodied
the ideals of the IPS, moving easily among numerous languages and cultures,
and among the diversity of approaches to Platonic studies. Dedicating this
book to him seemed the most natural thing to do. Saudades, Samuel.
Gabriele Cornelli
President of the International Plato Society
2
Introduction


Plato’s Literary Style



Samuel Scolnicov
Beyond Language and Literature
Literary forms have often been used to develop philosophical positions. In fact,
as far as we know, written prose was first developed for history and philosophy
by Herodotus and Anaximander and a few others. Aphorisms were used by Her-
aclitus and Nietzsche, essays by Montaigne, monologues by Augustine and Des-
cartes, and hierarchically numbered propositions by Wittgenstein. These were,
each at its time, a novel form of philosophical discourse, intrinsically connected
with the philosophical positions presented.
Time and again, dialogue has been used in philosophical writing as a liter-
ary façade. Cicero did it, and so did later, among many others, Galileo and Ber-
keley.¹ But their dialogues are little more than confrontations of ideas thinly
veiled behind names of speakers that are mere personifications of philosophical
positions. Salviati is mostly a spokesman for Galileo himself and Simplicio is, as
expected, an aristotelian. Berkeley’s Hylas is the materialist, as his name im-
plies, and Philonous is ‘the lover of mind’, to wit: Berkeley himself. Their philo-
sophical positions could be and were developed also apart from the literary form
in which they were presented in these dialogues.
A platonic dialogue, by contrast, is real drama, with developed characters,
personality clashes, in most cases with an elaborate setting, even ostensibly pre-
cise dramatic date.² What happens in it is not just a conflict of ideas, but a full
confrontation of individuals,³ with all their complexities, intellectual as well as
emotional and moral. Drama can carry ideas, and often does. This was done by
Ibsen and Bernard Shaw, as had been done much before by Aristophanes and
many others to this day. But these are dramas in which ideas are exemplified;

Baixar 3.45 Mb.

Compartilhe com seus amigos:
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   25




©historiapt.info 2022
enviar mensagem

    Página principal