Minerals Review Ruby Deposits: a review and Geological Classification Gaston Giuliani


Figure 10. The trapiche texture of corundum. (A



Baixar 8.58 Mb.
Pdf preview
Página14/29
Encontro26.07.2022
Tamanho8.58 Mb.
#24366
1   ...   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   ...   29
ruby deposits[01-22]
Figure 10. The trapiche texture of corundum. (A) Photomicrograph in transmitted light of a trapiche ruby 
from Mong Hsu, Myanmar (Photo: Virginie Garnier) and (B) aspect of a “trapiche-like” sapphire from 
southern Africa (2 cm × 1.8 cm × 0.2 cm, 13.46 cts). Photo: Louis-Dominique Bayle © le Règne Minéral.
The trapiche texture is best seen in cross-sections perpendicular to the c axis. The presence and 
size of the core depends on the orientation of the cross-section in the crystal [57] (Figure 11A). Thus, 
two cross-section appearances are possible: (1) the core is present and the sector boundaries surround 
it and develop from its edges to the rim of the crystal, separating six trapezoidal growth sectors 
(Figure 11B) and (2) the core is absent and the sector boundaries intersect at a central point, giving 
rise to triangular growth sectors (Figure 11C). 
Variable contents of chromophores, in particular Cr but also Ti and V have been detected in 
different rubies as well as within the same samples [52,58,59]. This can explain why the core can be 
red (Cr > Ti) or black (Ti > Cr) [60], although the core is sometimes yellowish/white-to-brown like the 
sector boundaries. For both core and sector boundaries, the yellowish/white-to brown color is due to 
the presence of calcite, dolomite, corundum, unidentified silicate inclusions containing K-Al-Fe-Ti, 
and Fe-bearing minerals. Iron oxides/hydroxides formed during late weathering that was favored by 
the high porosity of the sector boundaries (Figure 12) [52,57]. The sector boundaries develop along 
the ‹110› directions and can contain other solid inclusions such as plagioclase, rutile, titanite, 
margarite, zircon, etc. [57–59], but they do not contain matrix material from the host rock. This 
absence is an important feature differentiating trapiche rubies from trapiche emeralds [61]. 
Figure 10.
The trapiche texture of corundum. (A) Photomicrograph in transmitted light of a trapiche
ruby from Mong Hsu, Myanmar (Photo: Virginie Garnier) and (B) aspect of a “trapiche-like” sapphire
from southern Africa (2 cm × 1.8 cm × 0.2 cm, 13.46 cts). Photo: Louis-Dominique Bayle
© le
Règne Minéral.
The trapiche texture is best seen in cross-sections perpendicular to the c axis. The presence and
size of the core depends on the orientation of the cross-section in the crystal [
57
] (Figure
11
A). Thus,
two cross-section appearances are possible: (1) the core is present and the sector boundaries surround
it and develop from its edges to the rim of the crystal, separating six trapezoidal growth sectors
(Figure
11
B) and (2) the core is absent and the sector boundaries intersect at a central point, giving rise
to triangular growth sectors (Figure
11
C).
Variable contents of chromophores, in particular Cr but also Ti and V have been detected in
di
fferent rubies as well as within the same samples [
52
,
58
,
59
]. This can explain why the core can be
red (Cr
> Ti) or black (Ti > Cr) [
60
], although the core is sometimes yellowish
/white-to-brown like the
sector boundaries. For both core and sector boundaries, the yellowish
/white-to brown color is due to
the presence of calcite, dolomite, corundum, unidentified silicate inclusions containing K-Al-Fe-Ti, and
Fe-bearing minerals. Iron oxides
/hydroxides formed during late weathering that was favored by the
high porosity of the sector boundaries (Figure
12
) [
52
,
57
]. The sector boundaries develop along the
‹110› directions and can contain other solid inclusions such as plagioclase, rutile, titanite, margarite,
zircon, etc. [
57

59
], but they do not contain matrix material from the host rock. This absence is an
important feature di
fferentiating trapiche rubies from trapiche emeralds [
61
].


Minerals 2020, 10, 597
12 of 83

Baixar 8.58 Mb.

Compartilhe com seus amigos:
1   ...   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   ...   29




©historiapt.info 2023
enviar mensagem

    Página principal