Microsoft Word Samara Reis Dissertacao Mestrado versao final submetida docx



Baixar 5.46 Mb.
Pdf preview
Página31/52
Encontro30.06.2021
Tamanho5.46 Mb.
1   ...   27   28   29   30   31   32   33   34   ...   52
Total 
Male 
Female 
 






Age group (years old) 
 
 
 
 
 
 
18 - 22 
27 
10.3 
10 
37.0 
17 
63.0 
     23 - 27 
66 
25.2 
18 
27.3 
48 
72.7 
     28 - 32 
56 
21.4 
26 
46.4 
30 
53.6 
     33 - 37 
42 
16.0 
20 
47.6 
22 
52.4 
     38 - 47 
47 
17.9 
13 
27.7 
34 
72.3 
     48 - 57 
11 
4.2 

27.3 

72.7 
    
³ 58 
13 
5.0 

46.2 

53.8 
Total  262 
100.0 
96 
36.6 
166 
63.4 
 
Table 2 
Sample distribution per educational attainment and family`s monthly income by sex and in total 
 
Total 
Male 
Female 
 






Educational attainment 
 
 
 
 
 
 
     
£ High school / technical school 
74 
28.2 
31 
41.9 
43 
58.1 
     College degree 
81 
30.9 
33 
40.7 
48 
59.3 
     Post-graduation 
107 
40.8 
32 
29.9 
75 
70.1 
Monthly income (per family) 
 
 
 
 
 
 
     < 1 salaries 

1.9 

40.0 

60.0 
     1 to 3 salaries 
44 
16.8 
16 
36.4 
28 
63.6 
     3 to 5 salaries 
69 
26.3 
27 
39.1 
42 
60.9 
     5 to 15 salaries 
97 
37.0 
32 
33.0 
65 
67.0 
     > 15 salaries 
47 
17.9 
19 
40.4 
28 
59.6 
Total  262 
100.0 
96 
36.6 
166 
63.4 
 
After  six  months,  all  included  participants  that  had  agreed  to  be  contacted  by  email 
received an invitation for submitting their responses one more time. Overall, 43 answers were 
computed for test-retest reliability analysis. 
 
Instruments 
 
Autism-Spectrum Quotient (AQ)  –  The  AQ  (Baron-Cohen  et  al.,  2001)  is  a  50-item 
self-report  answered  on  a  4-point  scale  (“definitely  agree”,  “slightly  agree”,  “slightly 
disagree”  and  “definitely  disagree”),  that  was  developed  to  assess  autistic  traits  across  five 


74
domains  (social  skill,  attention  switching,  attention  to  detail,  communication  and 
imagination). Reported coefficient alphas ranged from .63 to .77. Originally, each item was 
scored 1 or 0 according to the presence or absence of the autistic trait. However, subsequent 
studies  suggested  that  the  three-factor  structure  (“social  skills”,  “details  /  patterns”  and 
“communication / mentalization”) presented a better fit to the data, and the items should be 
scored 1 to 4, reverting scores when necessary, in order to preserve the degree to which an 
individual agrees or disagrees to each sentence, especially when studying the distribution of 
scores in general population (Austin, 2005; Hurst, Mitchell, Kimbrel, Kwapil & Nelson-Gray, 
2007). Recent studies support that recommendation, indicating that the polytomic method of 
scoring  is  more  sensitive  to  the  BAP  and  also  improves  internal  consistency  and  test-retest 
reliability  of  the  AQ  (Murray,  Booth,  McKenzie  &  Kuenssberg,  2016;  Stevenson  &  Hart, 
2017). 
 
Cross-cultural adaptation of the AQ 
 
The AQ was first translated into Brazilian-Portuguese (BR-PT) by one of the authors 
(Reis),  a  native  BR-PT  speaker,  and  then,  back-translated  to  English  by  a  native  English 
speaker  that  was  naïve  to  the  AQ.  Next,  the  back-translated  version  was  compared  to  the 
original by a native English speaker expert in psychological assessment and familiar with the 
AQ,  who  judged  if  the  two  versions  were  equivalent  in  meaning.  No  item  was  considered 
divergent in meaning, but a few items were considered partially different from the original, 
and  corrected  as  suggested  by  the  judge,  to  preserve  original  intention  and  intensity  of  the 
wording. 
In order to verify if the translated version of the AQ was understandable and easy to 
fill out, a debriefing was conducted among a convenience sample of 10 people, with different 


75
levels  of  educational  attainment  and  socioeconomic  status.  The  participants  were  asked  to 
read  the  items  and  comment  if  they  had  any  trouble  understanding  the  meaning  or  the 
vocabulary  used  on  each  sentence.  In  addition,  three  experts  judged  the  semantic  validity. 
Only five items were slightly modified after this stage, with the exchange of a few words with 
others of more frequent use and / or easier to comprehend. The final version was, therefore, 
considered reliably equivalent to the original English version and semantically adapted for the 
Brazilian population, regardless of educational level of respondents. 
 
Data Analysis 
 
All  analyses  were  conducted  using  the  softwares  Factor  (Lorenzo-Seva  &  Ferrando, 
2006)  version  10.5.03  and  R.  Items’  scores  were  reversed  accordingly  to  the  original 
instrument, so that higher scores indicate more Autism-Spectrum traits. Items were scored 1 
to 4, preserving degree of accordance, as suggested in other studies (Austin, 2005; Hurst et 
al., 2007). 
Adequation  of  data  for  factor  extraction  was  tested  using  the  Keiser-Meyer-Olkim 
index  (KMO).  Subsequently,  exploratory  factor  analysis  (EFA)  was  carried  out  employing 
Bayesian  Information  Criterion  (BIC)  and  the  Parallel  Analysis  with  permutation  of  data 
values  (Timmerman  &  Lorenzo-Seva,  2011),  in  order  to  study  how  many  factor  should  be 
extracted, since there`s divergence in literature about the factorial structure of the AQ. Since 
the  data  was  categorical,  parameter  estimates  were  calculated  from  the  polychoric  items 
correlation  matrix,  and  robust  Weighted  Least  Squares  Means  and  Variance  adjusted 
(WLSMV)  estimator  was  used.  The  possible  solutions  were  examined  performing  a 
confirmatory  factor  analysis  (CFA)  using  an  oblique  rotation  (Promax),  since  it  was 
reasonable to assume that sub-components would be correlated. Goodness of fit was analyzed 


76
considering the comparative fit index (CFI), Tucker-Lewis index (TLI), and root mean square 
error of approximation (RMSEA). The criteria used as cutoff points for fit indices were: CFI / 
TLI  >.95  (good),  .90  to  .95  (borderline),  and  <.90  (poor);  RMSEA  <.06  (good),  .06  to  .08 
(fair), .08 to .10 (borderline), and >.10 (poor) (Hu & Bentler, 1999; Byrne, 2012). Different 
versions  of  the  scale  were  analyzed  accordingly  to  factor  loadings.  Decisions  about  item-
dropping were made, using a cutoff of loadings <.32, since that corresponds to an overlapping 
variance of approximately 10% with the other items on the same factor (Tabachnick & Fidel, 
2001; Costello & Osborne, 2005). Items that loaded >.32 on more than one factor were kept if 
the difference between lowest and highest loading were >.10 and highest loading occurred on 
a factor where it theoretically fit. Items that only loaded above cutoff on a factor where they 
didn’t  theoretically  fit  were  dropped.  Ultimately,  each  version  was  tested  for  internal 
consistency using Cronbach`s alpha. 
After  finding  the  version  of  the  scale  with  best  internal  consistency,  another 
confirmatory  factor  analyses  (CFA)  was  carried  out  using  structural  equation  modeling 
(SEM), to test adjustment of the model to the data, considering the reduced version of the AQ. 
Total scores and subscale scores in the final version of the scale were computed for 
each participant and normality tests were carried out, in order to study distribution of scores in 
the  sample,  using  Kolmogorov-Smirnov  (K-S)  and  Shapiro-Wilk  (S-W).  Reliability  of  AQ 
was tested by analyzing correlations between test and retest responses. Spearman`s correlation 
between scores in the final version and in the full 50-item version was tested, to examine if 
the reduced version remained consistent with the original one. 
Group differences in scores by sex were studied, employing Independent Sample t-test 
for normally distributed scores and Mann-Whitney U for non-normal scores. Norms for the 
Brazilian population were extracted. 
 

1   ...   27   28   29   30   31   32   33   34   ...   52


©historiapt.info 2019
enviar mensagem

    Página principal