Microsoft Word 14 elpub2012 Abstract ea38 Full doc


Keywords. Electronic publication, open access, scholarly communication, history,  Portugal   Introduction



Baixar 105.1 Kb.
Pdf preview
Página2/6
Encontro25.04.2021
Tamanho105.1 Kb.
1   2   3   4   5   6
Keywords. Electronic publication, open access, scholarly communication, history, 

Portugal  



Introduction  

It  is  crucial  for  scientists  and  scholars  to  disseminate  the  results  of  their  research.  In 

order  for  new  scientific  knowledge  to  settle,  it  should  be  shared  by  a  group  of 

individuals  that  validate  and  incorporate  it  into  new  research,  on  a  continuous  and 

ongoing  process.  For  centuries,  science  has  been  communicated  essentially  through 

traditional  printed  materials  (e.g.  books,  journals).  However,  due  to  recent  social, 

economic and technological developments, several changes occurred in the means used 

to communicate science. 

                                                 

1

 Corresponding Author: Maria Cristina Guardado, Escola Superior de Tecnologia e Gestão de Águeda, 



Apartado 473, 3754 – 909 Águeda, Portugal; Email: cguardado@ua.pt. 


Throughout  the  twentieth  century,  the  commercial  interests  that  have  dominated 

the  scholarly  communication  system  caused  considerable  difficulties  in  the  access  to 

specialised contents, particularly regarding scientific journals. This scenario led to the 

development  of  a  movement  advocating  free  access  to  scientific  knowledge  (Open 

Access  Movement  –  OA).  This  movement,  which  supports  open  science  and  free 

access  to  information,  influenced  scientific  publication  considerably,  especially  with 

regard  to  journals,  which  have  sought,  from  early  on,  to  profit  from  the  advantages 

offered  by  electronic  means.  Nevertheless,  the  adoption  of  new  channels  to 

communicate science is not homogeneous in the different scientific communities, being 

this process influenced by the epistemic culture of each community [1, 2, 3]. If, in the 

field of "hard sciences" (e.g. physics, chemistry or biology), digital communication is 

considered natural, arts and humanities, where history is included, have been less keen 

on  taking  advantage  of  the  benefits  offered  by  the  technological  infrastructure  to 

support  research.  In  fact,  in  this  field  of  knowledge,  practices  of  communicating 

science tend to remain faithful to more traditional schemes [4]. According to Borgman 

[5]  and  Staley  [6],  humanists  should  change  their  attitude  in  order  not  to  neglect  the 

opportunities  offered  by  the  new  technological  environment,  which  allows  authors  to 

maximise the public exposure of their work. 

Stevan  Harnad  [7]  refers  to  the  existence  of  between  25  and  30  thousand  peer-

reviewed journals across all areas of knowledge. From these, about a quarter are Gold 

OA journals, meaning that they provide online free access to their articles shortly after 

publication  [7].  Laakso  et  al.  [8]  give  an  account  of  the  significant  growth  in  the 

number  of  Gold  OA  journals  since  2000.  Despite  the  undeniable  proliferation  of 

electronic titles in all areas of knowledge, the truth is that arts and humanities still have 

behavioural patterns that differ from those of natural sciences and technology. 

A UK study [9] points out to a significant increase in the use of electronic journals 

by  scientists  from  different  fields  of  knowledge.  However,  it  reveals  important 

disciplinary  differences.  In  fact,  when  compared  to  other  researchers,  historians  are 

those who less use electronic journals on a daily basis. There seem to be two reasons 

that  justify  this  type  of  behaviour.  One  is  related  to  the  absence  of  the  needed 

information in a digital format. The other may be due to the importance still attributed 

to  other  materials,  namely  books.  Considering  these  elements,  it  is  important  to  take 

into  account  the  specificities  of  the  various  epistemic  communities  in  studies  on  the 

adoption of electronic publishing in different scientific areas [10]. 

In  Portugal,  the  available  data  shows  that,  from  2004  onwards,  online  access  to 

international scientific publications (journals, electronic books and others) and their use 

has been increasing substantially [11]. The same is verifiable in relation to free access 

institutional  repositories  of  scientific  information  and  to  the  volume  of  documents 

deposited in them, especially after 2008 [11]. Even though data analysis seems to point 

out to an increased acknowledgement of digital information by the national scientific 

community, including arts and humanities, the truth is that there are few studies on the 

adoption  of  ICT  among  Portuguese  scientists.  Moreover,  studies  on  electronic 

publishing and open access to scientific literature are particularly scarce and seem to be 

more  focused  on  communities  formed  around  an  organisation  than  around 

epistemological areas.  


1   2   3   4   5   6


©historiapt.info 2019
enviar mensagem

    Página principal